National Strategy for Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI) Act

An Act to establish a national strategy for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI)

This bill was last introduced in the 41st Parliament, 1st Session, which ended in September 2013.

Status

Considering committee report (Senate), as of June 20, 2013
(This bill did not become law.)

Summary

This is from the published bill. The Library of Parliament often publishes better independent summaries.

This enactment requires the Minister of Health to convene a conference with the provincial and territorial ministers responsible for health for the purpose of establishing a national strategy in order to, among other things,

(a) ensure clinical trials are started for the treatment of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI); and

(b) estimate and identify the appropriate source of the funding required to undertake those clinical trials in Canada and to track individuals who have been treated for CCSVI.

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Multiple Sclerosis
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

October 30th, 2013 / 3:15 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, the debate concerning CCSVI should be based on science, evidence, and improving the quality of life for Canadians with MS, who wonder how the government is going to judge the radically different CCSVI data from the east and west of Canada. Canadians with MS ask that if the debate was about evidence, why did the Minister of Health not meet with CCSVI groups across the country and with Canadians who had been treated to learn of their experience? Why did she not include experts in CCSVI in her scientific expert working group, and why was the decision to kill Bill S-204 was taken eight months before the Senate hearings?

The petitioners are calling on the minister to consult experts, undertake phase three clinical trials on an urgent basis, and require follow-up care.

Multiple Sclerosis
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

December 10th, 2012 / 3:15 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present a stack of petitions on CSVI. This debate was never based on the science as it should have been, but rather on wilful blindness, medical politics and collusion with special interest groups.

Conservative senators had the opportunity to finally do the right thing and act in the best interests of Canadians with MS and vote for Bill S-204. Instead, they silenced Canadians with MS and they silenced clause-by-clause study of the bill.

The petitioners call for phase III clinical trials at multiple centres across Canada and to require follow up care.

Multiple Sclerosis
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

November 8th, 2012 / 12:25 p.m.
See context

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present a petition on CCSVI, particularly as, on Tuesday, 52 Conservative senators voted en masse to block MS sufferers from testifying before a Senate committee on Bill S-204.

I am wondering if anyone can imagine cancer sufferers not being allowed to present at a committee studying cancer. Why did the government shut down the voices of Canadian MS patients?

The petitioners call for the Minister of Health to undertake phase III clinical trials on an urgent basis in multiple centres across Canada and to require follow-up care for Canadian MS patients.

Health
Oral Questions

November 2nd, 2012 / 11:45 a.m.
See context

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is three years since CCSVI became known to the world. While the government has failed to collect a shred of evidence, 60 other countries have undertaken 30,000 procedures and 1,200 Canadians with MS have died waiting for action.

Now Bill S-204 is being debated by the Senate where Conservative senators are refusing to hear from MS patients. Why is the government silencing MS patients? Why is it shutting down these important voices?