Evidence of meeting #33 for Fisheries and Oceans in the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament’s site, as are the minutes.) The winning word was funding.

A recording is available from Parliament.

On the agenda

MPs speaking

Also speaking

  • Greg Farrant  Manager, Government Affairs and Policy, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters
  • John Van Rooyen  Hatchery Manager, Board of Directors, Bluewater Anglers
  • Terry Quinney  Provincial Manager, Fish and Wildlife Services, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters
  • Kristen Courtney  Committee Researcher

4:45 p.m.

Conservative

Robert Sopuck Dauphin—Swan River—Marquette, MB

In terms of actual on-the-ground programming to effectively control an invasive species that's already invaded a given habitat, have there been many success stories, or any success stories, you can point to whereby an invasive species has actually been either eliminated or reduced to such a level that it's not a threat any more?

4:45 p.m.

Provincial Manager, Fish and Wildlife Services, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters

Dr. Terry Quinney

Unfortunately, the closest example I can give you is sea lamprey control: that with constant management and vigilance it can be successfully managed, but not eliminated.

So you're quite right; that's the lesson, lesson number one: can we prevent these harmful species from entering our ecosystems in the first place? That's the most effective course of action, to prevent wherever possible.

4:45 p.m.

Conservative

Robert Sopuck Dauphin—Swan River—Marquette, MB

To follow up on that, do you think that if the level of effort remains the same in terms of preventing the Asian carp from entering the Great Lakes, if that continues or increases, we'll be successful in keeping the Asian carp out? Or, and I hate to say this, is it ultimately inevitable that they'll get in?

4:45 p.m.

Provincial Manager, Fish and Wildlife Services, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters

Dr. Terry Quinney

No, it's not ultimately inevitable.

4:45 p.m.

Conservative

Robert Sopuck Dauphin—Swan River—Marquette, MB

Good.

4:45 p.m.

Provincial Manager, Fish and Wildlife Services, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters

Dr. Terry Quinney

Even if, in the most unfortunate circumstance, Asian carp do move into, for example, Lake Michigan at first, we have to ask ourselves which one is potentially next and even more expensive from a societal point of view.

Again, on the topic of prevention of Asian carp, we'd invite you, as your study progresses, to invite representatives of the Great Lakes cities initiative, the Great Lakes commission, who, to their credit, invested several million dollars in a very good engineering study that has clearly shown the feasibility of physical separation of those two basins.

Is it expensive? Yes. But they've shown that it can be accomplished, and accomplished in a way that would not only prevent aquatic invasive species but would provide benefits to other segments of the economy, not only benefits to recreational fishing and commercial fishing but benefits to how goods are transported through that Chicago shipping canal system—and flood water control, for that matter.

4:45 p.m.

Conservative

Robert Sopuck Dauphin—Swan River—Marquette, MB

I think my time is up.

Thank you very much.

4:45 p.m.

Conservative

The Chair Rodney Weston

Thank you very much.

Mr. Gravelle.

April 23rd, 2012 / 4:45 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

Thank you.

Thank you to the witnesses for being here.

Mr. Farrant, in your presentation you said that you're the largest non-profit conservation-based organization in Ontario, and one of the largest in Canada. Can you tell me where you get your funding from?

4:45 p.m.

Manager, Government Affairs and Policy, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters

Greg Farrant

Certainly. Our funding for the most part comes from our membership.

4:45 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

Do you get any money from any level of government, provincial or federal?

4:45 p.m.

Manager, Government Affairs and Policy, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters

Greg Farrant

As I indicated earlier, we get approximately $300,000 per year from the Province of Ontario, which we match. That comes from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. We get small funding envelopes from both the Department of the Environment and DFO. The Environment Canada money in the last calendar year was somewhere in the neighbourhood of $50,000 plus a bit, and the same for DFO.

Other than that, all of the money that's spent by our organization on conservation projects is generated through membership dollars.

4:45 p.m.

Provincial Manager, Fish and Wildlife Services, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters

Dr. Terry Quinney

Sir, if I may, you've heard in this presentation how highly we value partnerships. We receive no government money for our operating budgets, but we will partner with anyone who is interested in improving the health of fish and wildlife, and conservation in this country.

4:45 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

Okay, fine.

I'm not sure who said it, Mr. Quinney or Mr. Farrant, but one of you said that emptying bait buckets into a lake introduces foreign species.

4:50 p.m.

Manager, Government Affairs and Policy, Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters