Evidence of meeting #40 for Government Operations and Estimates in the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament’s site, as are the minutes.) The winning word was estimates.

A recording is available from Parliament.

On the agenda

MPs speaking

Also speaking

  • Allen Schick  Distinguished Professor, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland, As an Individual
  • Jack Stilborn  Retired, Library of Parliament, As an Individual

4:45 p.m.

NDP

The Chair Pat Martin

Thank you, Mr. Stilborn. That was a very thoughtful and interesting presentation.

We're going to jump right into questions then. We'll begin with the NDP. Alexandre Boulerice.

4:45 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Stilborn, thank you for coming here to make your presentation. It was very interesting, but at times also troubling.

When you stress the indifference of Parliament to examining budget estimates, it calls to mind other presentations we have heard in which we have been told that scrutinizing expenses is the reason Parliament exists. If it is our role, but we are not fulfilling that role because we are not interested, we have a problem.

You say that members of Parliament are not provided with enough incentives to do this work conscientiously and to spend a lot of time on it. You also mention that it is not very glamorous politically. Yes, I have to confess that committee work is not the first thing my constituents want to talk to me about.

If there are insufficient incentives, what do you suggest to change that situation, that culture? You seem a little negative, a little pessimistic when you say: “In the committees, the estimates process will continue to be about looking for issues, rather than actually changing government spending.”

If there are not enough incentives, if government members cannot really criticize their own government and if opposition members are sitting here solely to sniff out scandals, what concrete changes are you suggesting?

4:45 p.m.

Retired, Library of Parliament, As an Individual

Jack Stilborn

I probably do need to talk a little bit about the impression that I may have given of general indifference to the estimates, because I certainly don't want to create that impression. I think that MPs, generally speaking, go through the considerable inconvenience and challenge of becoming involved in politics because they are very passionate about what government does and how public money is spent.

That passion surfaces from time to time in discussions of singular issues that catch parliamentary and public attention. I'm talking about not so much indifference as an almost act of revulsion to the appearance every year of the estimates documents in large piles and reports, which most MPs who I have talked with personally find to be very turgid and uninformative. They feel that these things are being inflicted upon them and they have to wade their way through them to do the formal estimates work, and then at the end of the formal estimates work there's nothing much to do with the estimates other than report them back.

It's not so much indifference as perhaps an element of hopelessness produced by the constraints of the formal estimates process.

4:45 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

I want to talk to you about the timing of the process of approving the estimates and the presentation of the budget. It is an odd situation in that the supplementary estimates (C) come at practically the same time as the main estimates. Then that is followed by the budget, which has nothing to do with the main estimates we have just examined.

The American professor we spoke to earlier talked about two stages. The first is when we look at the strategy, the big picture, the overarching issues in the budget; the second is when we look at the expenses in detail, meaning the main estimates and the supplementary estimates (A), (B) and (C). But there should be some connection between the main estimates and the budget itself. They cannot be completely disconnected from each other.

What do you think should be the time between the budget being brought down and the main estimates?

4:45 p.m.

Retired, Library of Parliament, As an Individual

Jack Stilborn

I think the first thing I would say is that if we think about the key requirements that one would expect Parliament to bring to these various documents and pieces, you essentially need to be able to hear what the government is proposing to do in the budget, and then you need to be able to track what it's doing through a succession of reports, estimates, documents, and other information sources.

Personally, I'm not sure that the sequence of these various reports is the critical matter in the tracking. As long as every document is quite clear about what it is and what's in it, and explains clearly how the other documents add supplementary or complementary information, it should be possible to track the story.

Having said that, it does seem odd to have what appears to be a kind of mingling of different fiscal years, where you get the budget and then you bounce back to the main estimates. Personally, I don't understand why the timing couldn't be altered in a modest way by moving the budget forward, possibly into late January or early February, as soon as Parliament comes back, and then moving the estimates tabling to later on.

As we already recognize, the deadline for placing the estimates before Parliament has no substantive consequence. The estimates are placed before Parliament and then they sit there for several months before committees get around to examining them. I don't see why you couldn't move the main estimates later into the spring, into May perhaps, and that would allow a considerable portion of the proposals in the budget to be costed specifically and put into the main estimates.

Let's remember, too, that the main estimates are called “estimates”. If they're not dead right, then there are plenty of opportunities in supplementaries later on to correct that. If that were done, you would have a sequence that starts with the budget and then merges through....

As I said, I don't know how much stands on this, but certainly that sequence is more obviously logical and transparent.

4:50 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Thank you very much.

Thank you for your suggestion; it is a constructive one, I find.

4:50 p.m.

NDP

The Chair Pat Martin

Thank you, Alexandre. Thank you, Mr. Stillborn.

For the Conservatives, Jacques Gourde.

4:50 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Stilborn, thank you for joining us and giving us a different perspective on our study. It is very interesting.

I am wondering about one paragraph in your presentation. You said that a priority should be for us to have a new online tool that could give us new or better information. You also said that the tool might be able to give us information riding by riding. Could you give us some more details about that tool?

I understand that it could be very interesting to see government expenses riding by riding, but it could well be tiresome work. It might be a source of pride to be able to determine how much was spent in old age security or employment insurance, but perhaps we would always end up comparing ourselves to others when situations are not necessarily comparable. Some regions have higher unemployment and that is not necessarily anyone's fault. It may also be that some regions have more seniors. I do not know how a tool like that would be relevant.

4:50 p.m.

Retired, Library of Parliament, As an Individual

Jack Stilborn

The main thing I can tell you, and I don't want to be in the position of creating myths about Treasury Board capacity, as it will make them very unhappy people, but I do know there is a single program activity architecture and it is a hierarchical structuring of programs. Then beneath them there are activities, sub-activities, and so on, and down at the very bottom, I believe, there is nominal cost information. They roll up the cost information to get the estimates and the cost of programs.

So, in theory, a great deal of what could be an online resource that could be available to parliamentarians exists over there. I have heard officials express some concerns about the cost of putting it online, for example. It could be that if you think about it in a very narrow framework focused on the formal estimates process, that might be a fair point to make. But if you think of it as an information resource supporting Parliament working on programs and their effectiveness both inside and outside the formal estimates process, then any costs involved become correspondingly more understandable.

In terms of the breakdown of information by writing, from time to time members do ask for that information about specific programs in written questions and by other means, and then the PCO goes into a panic and has to coordinate across all the departments pulling that information together. So the capacity to provide the information is there. We just do it now on an ad hoc basis.

I would have thought that if you have this kind of an online database, it ought not to be an insuperable problem to have that information built into it. Perhaps it would cost some money to do that, but on the other hand, the offsetting savings would be that you don't have these panic episodes when specific questions are asked.

4:55 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

It could well be interesting for a member of Parliament to have that information, but what would be the relevance in having it riding by riding, from an overall public administration perspective? Some departments can get us some information. But, in terms of the overall budget, not a lot would change for us.

4:55 p.m.

Retired, Library of Parliament, As an Individual

Jack Stilborn

It's fair to say that in many cases this information wouldn't have policy relevance, but it might have. Some members at least, as I mentioned, have asked for it and do ask for it from time to time. My logic is if Parliament wants to do something, then the role of the system is to help it do it. If there is no policy relevance to the information once it's been obtained, then that can be explained and the question gets put to bed, but at least members have the opportunity to see the information and decide for themselves whether or not they think a policy issue has been raised.

4:55 p.m.

NDP

The Chair Pat Martin

Thank you, Jacques.

Next we have Linda Duncan for the NDP.

April 25th, 2012 / 4:55 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Welcome, Mr. Stilborn, and thank you for your ideas, obviously based on a lot of experience.

I'd like to follow up on the discussion that's been going on about providing information riding by riding. I can certainly think of an obvious program where that was being requested; it was like pulling teeth, and that was the economic action plan.

Of course, where you have a plan like that where the intent is supposedly to provide jobs across the country, then it's pretty obvious that the MPs in each region, particularly those areas where there's high unemployment, are going to want to know. To do your job as a parliamentarian, you're going to want to have the information that tells you, okay, what's the overall expenditure, what are the policy objectives, where's that money being expended, and who's benefiting from it. Certainly, the process we went through on that was not open and transparent, and some MPs, to their credit, took their own staff time, hours and hours, getting that information.

Not necessarily about the riding by riding, but your recommendation about availability of information.... It's interesting that all the other experts who have appeared seemed to drill down to that, and certainly seemed to be endorsing what the Parliamentary Budget Officer was calling for even today. He noted that a good deal of this information is already provided to Treasury Board in a detailed way, and there doesn't seem to be any logical reason why that same information couldn't be made available to parliamentarians or certainly to the Parliamentary Budget Officer, who could in turn report.

A number of experts have recommended that the Parliamentary Budget Officer should report throughout the year, and perhaps monthly, on spending and comparison with policy proposals. I'm wondering what your comment might be there.

I think your idea is a good one. I don't think the detailed information would be of relevance and interest to MPs just on a riding-by-riding basis, but certainly to have the comparison on particular policy areas that they're following would be.

4:55 p.m.

Retired, Library of Parliament, As an Individual

Jack Stilborn

I think the idea of drilling down is kind of interesting. As a way of coping with the scope and scale of modern government, we've kind of institutionally passed the last several decades agglomerating information into more and more high-level statements. There was a sentiment at one point among the people who worked on parliamentary reporting that you were actually doing Parliament a favour by this because you were giving them something shorter, which has been a demand from time to time about estimates documents. It would give them in a nutshell a report on spending and what was happening. There is merit to the high-level discussion on how numerous programs contribute to outcomes, and so on.

One problem is that members of Parliament, in general, don't have a natural affinity for some of this very abstract language. In the world they live in there are real people in the ridings who have problems, or not, and finding if government can be helpful or not. At a policy level that's where they live. The system somehow has to help them do what they want to do and give them the kind of information they want to start with. There might very well be a learning curve of what would be most useful.

5 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

My understanding is that one of the roles of this committee is to also analyze across departments—in other words, where there is a substantive area that the government is delivering programs on, but they are being delivered through a number of departments and agencies.

In my previous role as the Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development critic, we ran into this, even when we had the minister and the deputy ADMs in the committee to look at the main estimates. It was simply revealed to us at that point, “Well, you can't ask that because that's actually for the Minister of Health. Gee, too bad she's not here.”

So it would be a far more useful exercise—and probably less frustrating for the officials and the ministers themselves—if a lot of that information could simply be available online. Then the process of estimates could be on the broader policies of what direction we are going in, and so forth.

I think there would be a lot of advantages to simply providing that information more openly and transparently. I think you sort of alluded to the issue that until that information is provided you can keep it as a hot issue. The hot issue is the government's secret. In fact, if the information were readily available, you could move on to bigger issues of Parliament. So I think you are raising some really interesting issues here.