Evidence of meeting #40 for Public Safety and National Security in the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament’s site, as are the minutes.) The winning word was device.

A recording is available from Parliament.

On the agenda

MPs speaking

Also speaking

3:55 p.m.

Conservative

Brent Rathgeber Edmonton—St. Albert, AB

Is there a way to monitor a jamming device?

3:55 p.m.

Vice-President, Track and Trace Solutions, 3M Company

Steve Chapin

Yes. The jamming device is only a transmitter and one could monitor that. What we do is monitor the presence of jamming and we report that.

3:55 p.m.

Conservative

Brent Rathgeber Edmonton—St. Albert, AB

So if law enforcement were so inclined, the technology exists for them to pinpoint the location of a jamming device.

3:55 p.m.

Vice-President, Track and Trace Solutions, 3M Company

3:55 p.m.

Conservative

Brent Rathgeber Edmonton—St. Albert, AB

Thank you. That was very helpful.

3:55 p.m.

Vice-President, Track and Trace Solutions, 3M Company

Steve Chapin

Thank you.

3:55 p.m.

Conservative

Brent Rathgeber Edmonton—St. Albert, AB

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

3:55 p.m.

Conservative

The Chair Kevin Sorenson

You have minutes left, if there's anyone else who would want to use your time.

Mr. Leef, I see your light is on.

3:55 p.m.

Conservative

Ryan Leef Yukon, YT

I was only going to ask quickly if there was any other.... The device has communication by text and voice communication. That's solely between the wearer of the monitoring device and the person. There is no other communication that the person can access, texting, email....

3:55 p.m.

Vice-President, Track and Trace Solutions, 3M Company

Steve Chapin

No. The device has automated communication in the event that the offender violates one of the conditions of his monitoring, so there's no intervention required. The device automatically calculates that and displays the message.

We can send automated messages to the device from the data centre, which can be requested by the officer simply logging onto the system.

When the officer receives a text message on his cellphone that says offender ABC has violated this rule, he can hit reply on his cellphone, which routes a message back through our data centre and sends the message to the offender. So with very little effort or time consumed, he can respond to that offender.

Then the device is capable of receiving phone calls from up to five different numbers, because we don't want an offender's girlfriend, for example, to get hold of the number on the phone. Then, by law, he has to be allowed to make a 911 call because it's a cellular device, but other than that there's no means of communication.

4 p.m.

Conservative

The Chair Kevin Sorenson

Thank you very much.

We'll now move to Mr. Scarpaleggia, please, for seven minutes.

May 15th, 2012 / 4 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Thank you, Chair.

You mentioned something about alcohol detectors. I missed that. Could you go over that again?

4 p.m.

Vice-President, Track and Trace Solutions, 3M Company

Steve Chapin

Yes, 3M manufactures a product called MEMS, which is a breath alcohol device that's located in the home. It's hooked up to external power and a phone line. If there's no phone line available it uses wireless communication.

When the offender is at home he will be randomly required to blow into the device. Most of the offenders are on house arrest, so they're scheduled to be home at certain periods of time anyway. The offender blows into the device, and while he is blowing into the device a picture is taken and the results, along with that picture, are sent to the monitoring centre where the results can be reviewed.

It's a breathalyzer. The results hold up in court, at least in U.S. courts.

4 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

You mentioned something about the predictive power of your technology. Again I missed part of that. Do you mean the power to predict where the offender will go next? Could you explain what that means?

4 p.m.

Vice-President, Track and Trace Solutions, 3M Company

Steve Chapin

We do what's called point pattern analysis and we're looking for commonality between points at given times during the day. When offenders start to deviate from these points, we can look at the deviation and sometimes we can predict when an offender is doing abnormal things that are outside the bounds of his program.