House of Commons Hansard #113 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was finance.

Topics

Manpower Training
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Winnipeg South Centre
Manitoba

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy Minister of Human Resources Development and Minister of Western Economic Diversification

Mr. Speaker, I am afraid I am not the one who caused the confusion. We made it very clear. My deputy minister has written to his counterpart in the Government of Quebec again underlining that we are quite anxious, willing and open to sit down with the Government of Quebec and the governments of other provinces to negotiate based upon the proposal that we have submitted for manpower training just as we are prepared to co-operate on helping to support strategic initiatives, helping to support new child care initiatives and helping to support a changeover so that we can develop a way of assisting on the very active and very useful program in Quebec, APPORT, which is a social assistance program.

In all these cases we have indicated time and again that we are prepared to co-operate with the province of Quebec to find new ways of solving problems. That stands in stark contrast to members of the opposition whose only position is to defend the status quo. They do not want to make any changes at all. We are the party and the government that wants to make the changes. It is about time they joined in.

The Economy
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Reform

Bob Ringma Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, as we have heard, today marks the first anniversary of the election of the 35th Parliament. While we have seen nothing but foot dragging on social reform, deficit reduction and replacement of the GST, we have seen some minor promises upheld.

My question to the Deputy Prime Minister is why has the government decided to put funding of special interest groups by way of reinstating the court challenges program ahead of much more urgent and wide ranging promises such as meaningful deficit reduction?

The Economy
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, probably the greatest legacy of the first year of the Prime Minister's government is that Canadians are starting to believe in the public process again.

Part of that public process means living up to your promises. The decision of the Government of Canada to reinstate the court challenges funding was a direct result of a promise made not only in the red book but a direct promise by the Prime Minister because of his belief that it is important that every Canadian have the right to have their rights defended under the charter.

The Economy
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Reform

Bob Ringma Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, last night the Prime Minister stated he wanted people's money to be used productively.

Will the Deputy Prime Minister explain how spending tax dollars to sue the government thus triggering the spending of even more taxpayers' money can be described as productive?

The Economy
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal Party and the Government of Canada believe in human rights and fairness. We think that the court challenges program at a cost of approximately $3 million annually is a great investment in the right of Canadians to have their rights respected under the law.

The court challenges program is a good investment. It is a smart investment. It is a wise use of Canadian taxpayer dollars.

Technology
Oral Question Period

October 25th, 1994 / 2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Gar Knutson Elgin—Norfolk, ON

Mr. Speaker, I congratulate the President of the Treasury Board who last night delivered the keynote address to open Technology in Government Week.

Technology costs money. How is the President of the Treasury Board going to make use of information technology to improve services to the Canadian public and at the same time reduce the cost of these services to the taxpayer?

Technology
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his question. The real credit for Technology in Government Week goes to the many public servants who are on the leading edge of bringing information technology to better use for the benefit of the taxpayers of this country.

Just a few months ago I released a report called The Blueprint for Using Information Technology in Renewing Government Services with a vision of making government services more affordable, more accessible and more responsive to the needs of the public.

There are a number of flagship projects in this regard that we are going to carry out. Indeed, it is not only going to reduce the cost of government but it is going to improve the services that are provided to the taxpayers of this country.

Copyright
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Canadian Heritage. The minister recently indicated that, in all likelihood, the bill on the second phase of the copyright reform will not be tabled before the beginning of next year. Yet, that reform has been long awaited, over six years in fact.

Will the Minister of Canadian Heritage confirm that the tabling of this bill is postponed to 1995, while he had pledged to present that legislation before the Christmas recess, and will he tell us why?

Copyright
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Laval West
Québec

Liberal

Michel Dupuy Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is confusing two different things: The basic decisions regarding the object of the bill which, as I said, will be made by the Canadian government before the end of this fall, and the actual tabling of the bill, which requires a substantial amount of work by the Department of Justice.

I did not contradict myself. We are on schedule. We are on course and we are following our timetable.

Copyright
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, are we to understand that the postponement of the copyright bill is due to the struggle between the Minister of Canadian Heritage and his colleague, the Minister of Industry, regarding the issue of neighbouring rights?

Copyright
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Laval West
Québec

Liberal

Michel Dupuy Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, there is no postponement. The hon. member misunderstood what I said. I think that she wants to look like she is trying to protect the artists. But I will tell you: She can try all she wants, people will not be fooled.

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Reform

Paul Forseth New Westminster—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Justice.

For a year now Canadians have been pleading with this government to make changes to the criminal justice system. Canadians want a tougher Young Offenders Act, they want serious offenders off the street and behind bars and they desperately want a life sentence to mean life.

Will the Minister of Justice reassure the people of Canada and tell this House today that tougher and more certain sentences will be put into place for all criminals and for all age groups?

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, in the year that we have been here and in connection with the justice agenda we have not only introduced specific changes to the Young Offenders Act which are now before the committee on which he makes a very constructive contribution, we have also asked that committee to undertake a complete review of the Young Offenders Act to ensure that we still have the best model of juvenile justice in this country.

In addition to that we have introduced comprehensive changes, improvements to the sentencing provisions of the Criminal Code and we have passed through this House of Commons an omnibus amendment to the Criminal Code with over 100 changes to modernize and make criminal law more effective.

Beyond that response through legislation with my colleague, the Solicitor General, this government has also created the national crime prevention council recognizing that crime prevention is a very important part of making our communities safer. That balanced approach is succeeding and is going to succeed further in making our communities safer.

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Paul Forseth New Westminster—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, the minister speaks of making changes. How about Allan Kinsella and Serge Damien who escaped from the Bath institution who should have been held in a maximum security prison and should not even have had a hope of parole for 25 years?

Will the minister tell this House whether or not he would support the repeal of section 745 of the Criminal Code and therefore make life indeed life?

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I made my position clear some months ago.

The government's position on section 745 is crystal clear. We introduced an amendment to section 745 to provide plainly that whenever an application is brought under that section that the court is obligated to hear from the families of the victims.

That is the change we propose in section 745. It is contained in Bill C-41 and that is the policy of this government.