House of Commons Hansard #42 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was children.

Topics

Supply
Government Orders

1:50 p.m.

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, one important revelation from this debate is that we now understand the employment strategy of the Reform Party. It is called the Cayman Islands employment strategy.

An important set of principles can be taken to heart. How do the Cayman Islands support their projects? A group of offshore companies register there in order to escape the tax burdens of all the other countries in the world.

What the member is suggesting is that Canada should be a tax haven for all the misfit companies around the world that want to escape their rightful obligation to pay their taxes to their rightful government.

Now there is one hell of a good employment strategy coming from the Reform Party. Let us have a Cayman Islands employment strategy, says the Reform Party. Except I do not think Canadians want to have a Cayman Islands employment strategy.

Canada is a serious industrial country, one of the top seven countries in the world. Canadians realize we need a comprehensive strategy, not just infrastructure but a wide combination. Infrastructure is important in one element; stimulation to small business is another; reduction of the payroll tax for small business; serious training programs; real attempts to get their educational system in place, a broad based comprehensive program.

That is what is going to create jobs, not following the precepts and principles of the Cayman Islands.

Supply
Government Orders

1:50 p.m.

Reform

Jim Gouk Kootenay West—Revelstoke, BC

Mr. Speaker, first I would like to express some gratitude on behalf of Tom Hanks who, had the Minister of Human Resources Development sought a different career, may not have won the award he received last night.

I would like to point out a couple of things. The minister talked about the apprenticeship programs, student loans, the youth service corps. He lumps them all together and says that we reject them. That is wrong. Certain programs have more merit than others.

For example, the apprenticeship program leads specifically to a direct career job and is something well worth pursuing. On the other hand to say that our poor youths after graduating from college can be helped by putting them in a make work community project which does nothing to enhance their career expectations may not be good value spent.

I would look to the unemployment insurance rebates. We often hear about smoke and mirrors. Let us look at that particular one. After we carry away the mirrors and disperse the smoke what we have is a raise in UI premiums by the government which, even before it implemented it, says: "We have created another job in small companies". I would suggest if that were true what the minister should have done was raise the rates by $3 instead of the 30 cents. Then the government could have knocked that entire $3 off and would have had 10 times as many jobs.

If the infrastructure program is needed, fine. Let us talk about the need for infrastructure repair. Let us not bring in the smoke and mirrors again and call it job creation because it does not create jobs. We have already discussed at length the fact that most of these jobs will be put to contract which will go to companies that have their crews and it will not create any new employment at all.

In creating the jobs we are talking about, the government will spend $70,000, according to studies, to create a $35,000 job which produces a $10,000 benefit to the government.

To create jobs for $1.6 million worth of people we would need $96 billion. Even if the roof of this building opened up and that money dropped in and it was spent without increasing the deficit, we would still have no jobs at the end of that year when that money was spent. The government's infrastructure program does not create employment. It simply addresses a different problem and the problem remains.

How is the government going to bring on long term jobs when it maintains the old Liberal strategy of tax and spend and not addressing the deficit?

Supply
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, I am really thrilled that the hon. member with such a profound question left me 30 seconds to answer it. The question deserves that length of answer.

How do we do it? It seems to me that there is one fundamental principle the hon. member should understand. It is that investing in our country, investing in infrastructure, investing in schools, investing in roads is one of the primary elements of creating growth and jobs.

By opposing the infrastructure program that was called for by every municipality across the country to improve its transportation system they are standing in the way of long term job growth development.

In the meantime they are also facing the fact that 40 per cent or 50 per cent of construction workers are out of work and this job creation program is one element among several that will get them back to work, create growth, and show the Reform just how their Cayman employment strategy makes no sense.

Supply
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

The Speaker

It being two o'clock p.m., pursuant to Standing Order 30(5), the House will now proceed to statements by members, pursuant to Standing Order 31.

Racial Discrimination
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Anna Terrana Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, on March 31, 1966 a group of black South Africans who were holding a peaceful demonstration were massacred in Sharpeville. During the same year the United Nations declared March 21 the International Day to Eliminate Racial Discrimination.

Yesterday International Day to Eliminate Racial Discrimination was celebrated around the world. In Vancouver I was a speaker at the event organized by the Vancouver Multicultural Society in co-operation with the Vancouver Police Department.

The road to democracy is hard and dangerous. Canada is a blessed country where we do not have to endure acts of racism but we are still far from being a racism-free country. A strong message must be sent out that racism and discrimination can no longer be tolerated. These two diseases must be completely stamped out for Canada to become an example to the rest of the world.

March 21 makes people pause and think. Through education and example we can achieve equality for all and respect for each other.

Let me congratulate the many volunteers-

Prix Du Mérite Du Français
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Bloc

Jean Landry Lotbinière, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the president of the Union des artistes, Serge Turgeon, presented sportscaster Richard Garneau, with le Prix du mérite du français dans le secteur culturel, a merit award for French language use in the cultural sector. For some time now, the Conseil pédagogique interdisciplinaire du Québec has been recognizing each year the outstanding contribution of an individual or organization to the promotion of dynamic and correct use of the French language.

Mr. Garneau reminds all Quebecers as well as francophones across Canada that correct use of a spoken language forms an integral part of everyday life, both at work and at play.

On behalf of all the members of this House from Quebec, I would like to pay him a well-deserved tribute.

Police Memorial
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw the attention of the House to the gallery. In our presence today are family members of police officers who have been tragically killed in the line of duty.

They have come to Ottawa to take part in the unveiling of a memorial dedicated to those officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice during the service and protection of their communities.

Names like Van der Wiel, Sonnenberg and King may not be widely known but they should be universally respected. It is that respect that I am expressing to the families assembled here today.

The dedication will take place at the Summer Pavilion on the Hill at 5 p.m.

I encourage all members to take a moment today to remember those officers who have been our most noble and brave public servants. May their legacies be a reminder to all of us of the need to reform our criminal justice system so that no more lives are needlessly lost to those elements of society who have not learned to respect the laws of our land.

Tainted Blood
Statements By Members

March 22nd, 1994 / 1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Beryl Gaffney Nepean, ON

Mr. Speaker, as a result of a 1983 blood transfusion, a Nepean constituent became infected with HIV and consequently developed AIDS. He carried this devastating disease unknowingly for 10 years before he was diagnosed with full blown AIDS. As a result of not knowing, his wife is now an AIDS carrier.

Federal and provincial assistance has been offered to only those directly affected by HIV tainted blood. They fail to recognize the secondary victims of this tragedy. This couple had no way of knowing that he was carrying the HIV. Had they known, cautionary measures would have been taken.

The primary victim has received financial assistance to help him in his time of need but who will help the secondary victim, his wife? I implore the Minister of Health to reopen the federal extraordinary assistance plan to take into consideration secondary victims of the tainted blood scandal.

Fenelon Falls Curling Team
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

John O'Reilly Victoria—Haliburton, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to salute the Fenelon Falls Secondary School girls

curling team which has earned a berth in the upcoming provincial high school curling championships in Sault Ste. Marie starting today until March 25.

We have all heard of the surprise performance in sporting competition, the small conquering the large, the David and Goliath syndrome. The courageous team I speak of, skip Jennifer Dickson, vice-skip Andrea Howard, second Cayley Rodd and lead Christina Dunn, won but a few games in the Cannington-Lindsay-Fenelon league this year.

However, in true underdog fashion the team peaked at the right time, finally winning a shootout against Trenton to see which team would represent central Ontario region at the all-Ontario provincials.

It is the first team from Fenelon Falls to compete at the championships and it will face a level of competition never before experienced.

I salute this team as it heads into uncharted waters and wish it all the best as it represents all central Ontario schools at the provincials.

Members Of Parliament
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

John Bryden Hamilton—Wentworth, ON

Mr. Speaker, there have been repeated calls in this House for reform of MP pensions, especially in the matter of double dipping. This, as members know, involves taking a government salary with the right hand while accepting a government pension with the left. My colleagues of the Reform Party opposite have been most eloquent in attacking this practice.

The taxpayer's dollar is the same dollar whether it comes from provincial pockets or federal pockets. I would therefore ask my Reform colleagues to join with me in urging that all parties institute a code of conduct whereby no MP collects a salary and a taxpayer funded pension at the same time.

I am sure all would agree, for example, that a $61,000 Alberta government pension on top of an MP's salary is a flagrant example of double dipping.

Members Of Parliament
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

The Speaker

I would hope that the statements would be of a more general nature as we go on.

Hyundai Car Plant In Bromont
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Bloc

Jean H. Leroux Shefford, QC

Mr. Speaker, it was with dismay that we heard about Hyundai's decision to suspend indefinitely the operation of its facilities in Bromont. Over 800 workers will be affected.

The Bloc Quebecois and the people of my region are outraged. Must I remind that Hyundai received substantial grants from the federal government to build its facilities in Bromont?

Now, we are told that company officials refuse to meet the primary stakeholders to discuss the situation. How can a company like Hyundai treat its workers so offhandedly?

The Bloc Quebecois urges the federal government to act immediately to preserve these workers' jobs as well as to make sure this never happens again. More than ever, the government must manage public funds with a strong hand.

The Grumman Goose
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Jay Hill Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to call the attention of the House to a potential tragedy for Canadian aviation history.

In a Prince George RCMP hangar rests the Grumman Goose. This plane was built in 1944, can land on water, snow or ground and has logged over 24,000 flying hours. It has seen service on both coasts, in Ottawa and the high Arctic. It has been used for drug busts, surveillance, rescues and air shows in addition to ferrying people and equipment.

The RCMP may have to sell this 50-year old plane and the National Aviation Museum cannot afford the estimated price tag of $300,000.

I implore the RCMP and the government to reconsider the possible sale of this plane to give Canadians the time to find alternatives for raising the money to preserve this piece of our heritage. If not, the last flight of the Goose will probably take it out of Canada forever, heading south of the border to the highest bidder.

Canadian Armed Forces
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

John Murphy Annapolis Valley—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, recently I had the pleasure and opportunity to visit CFB Greenwood and Camp Aldershot in my riding of Annapolis Valley-Hants.

During my visit to these bases I was most impressed by the dedication, professionalism and commitment of our men and women in the Canadian Armed Forces. These men and women often do their work with little or no public recognition. Yet our military has made a significant contribution to the maintenance of international peace and security.

This strong tradition of pride and service is a model for nations around the world. I am proud of the personnel serving in CFB Greenwood and Camp Aldershot.

As we embark on foreign defence policy reviews in the months ahead, I urge all parliamentarians to reflect on the professionalism of our military and the important role it plays at home and abroad.

The Late Kenneth Kidd
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, Kenneth Kidd, professor emeritus at Trent University, died recently.

He was born in 1906 and educated in Toronto and Chicago. He was a pioneer of modern archaeology in Canada. His work included excavating the famous Ste. Marie Among the Hurons site near Midland, Ontario and a project at the Cartier-Brebeuf site in Quebec City. He was an early student of petroglyphs in Canada.

He moved from the Royal Ontario Museum to Trent as founding chair of the department of anthropology.

In 1969 he founded the first university native studies program in Canada at Trent. This was a seed well planted as there are now upwards of 40 such programs across the country.

Ken Kidd and his wife Martha, both distinguished and productive citizens of Peterborough, received honorary degrees from Trent in 1990.

I am sure that my colleagues in this House join me in extending our condolences to Mrs. Kidd.