House of Commons Hansard #53 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was police.

Topics

Energy Efficiency
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Bloc

Roger Pomerleau Anjou—Rivière-Des-Prairies, QC

Mr. Speaker, the report which the Minister of Natural Resources has just tabled is another example of the form of centralizing federalism which Quebec chose to move away from on October 25 last. Whereas the Government of Quebec already has jurisdiction in this area, now the minister is announcing clearly today her plans to move further into this field.

Responsible energy management is a provincial matter. It is precisely this kind of jurisdictional overlap between levels of government that we must eliminate if we are to avoid these endless squabbles over jurisdiction which ultimately cost the taxpayers a pretty penny indeed.

Must we remind the minister once again that Quebec has already adopted a broad energy efficiency strategy, that it administers sizeable budgets for energy efficiency research and development and demonstration projects, and that it already has in place an important energy productivity program? Through its Department of Natural Resources, the Government of Quebec is already involved in this area, acting in co-operation with Hydro Quebec, the private sector and regional chambers of commerce.

If, as she claims, the minister really wants to reduce overlap between the provinces, then she should be setting an example and abolishing her department's own programs which only add to the confusion and distort the efforts undertaken by Quebec. If the minister cannot bring herself to do this, then she should at least have the decency to allow Quebec to oversee its own energy efficiency policy independently and turn over to the Quebec government the money she was planning to spend in the province under these nice Canada-wide programs.

Energy Efficiency
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Reform

Elwin Hermanson Kindersley—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, we appreciate the tabling of the document. We have no further comments at this time.

Interparliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

London East
Ontario

Liberal

Joe Fontana Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34(1), I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the report of the Canada-Europe Parliamentary Association of the 21st annual meeting between the Canadian and European Parliaments held in Vancouver, British Columbia, from February 15 to 18, 1994.

Might I add that this is one of many examples of a parliamentary association doing positive work on behalf of Canadians on an issue that could potentially have been very damaging to the Canadian economy and thousands of jobs, namely the forestry industry.

I want to thank everyone who participated in this great forum because I think we did good work for Canada.

Decade Of The Brain Act
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Sue Barnes London West, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-239, an act respecting the decade of the brain.

Mr. Speaker, I wish to introduce a bill to declare the 1990s the decade of the brain following an original initiative of the World Health Organization in the late 1980s.

It is the human brain which makes us unique among living creatures. Ailments of the brain carry with them heart rending disabilities that can rob us of the very essence of personhood. The real tragedy is not only the disease that may cause death but the disintegration of the mind, with devastating impact on family and on society.

A great threat to the independence of the elderly are diseases of the brain, some treatable, most preventable. A healthy mind is the greatest guarantee for continued independence.

A cognitive mental stability enhances the ability to heal and recuperate, to cope and overcome physical ailments. It is also important to note that diseases of the brain are among the costliest, both directly and indirectly.

It is my fond hope that the bill will raise the awareness of Canadians and will encourage further research and support to those in our communities who are forging advances of knowledge that will ultimately improve the lives of all of us.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

National Citizenship Week
Routine Proceedings

April 20th, 1994 / 3:15 p.m.

Reform

Deborah Grey Beaver River, AB

Mr. Speaker, as members know, music is one of the most effective ways of communicating our love for Canada. In this week of national citizenship some of us participated in the Hall of Honour yesterday reaffirming our oath.

We sang "O Canada" like it has never been sung before, I am sure, in these halls. In every one of our constituencies there are gifted individuals, choirs, et cetera. Unfortunately music is conspicuously absent from the daily proceedings here in Parliament. After having given notice to the other two official parties in the House I am seeking unanimous consent for the following motion:

That Standing Order 30 be amended by adding the following words: "and shall cause Canada's National Anthem to be played or sung in the House every Wednesday immediately preceding oral questions".

I think you would find unanimous consent in the House for that, Mr. Speaker.

National Citizenship Week
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Don Boudria Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, I agree with the substance of what the member is trying to propose.

However, there are errors in the drafting of the text. Perhaps the member would be willing to move that the item in question be referred to the parliamentary committee on procedure. I am acting chairman and I commit to her to deal with it forthwith. As a matter of fact, we have a meeting as early as tomorrow morning. There are errors in the text. It does not refer to what subsection of section 30 the item should be addressed to.

It is traditional for amendments to the standing orders to be made pursuant to a recommendation of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

If the member is willing to make that small modification, on behalf of my colleagues I am willing to give consent to have the matter referred immediately to the parliamentary committee in question.

National Citizenship Week
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Reform

Deborah Grey Beaver River, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is my understanding that when we asked the Table and the clerks about this, it was in order. It was given back to me saying that it was in order and we could proceed with it. I appreciate the generosity of the member and, barring unanimous consent in the Chamber now when we are on national TV, that the secondary way we could proceed is as he suggested.

As an individual member I believe I have every right and privilege to ask if there is unanimous consent for the motion so I would like the Chair to put the motion to see if there is unanimous consent for it.

National Citizenship Week
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Don Boudria Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is not a matter of whether this issue is dealt with on or off television. I would like to think that we stand for a bit more substance than that.

The issue is whether the wording is proper. I am acting chairman of the committee this week. I have given my undertaking to the member. If this is as serious as she claims it is and I believe it is, then surely a commitment to deal with it at 10 or 10.30 tomorrow morning in committee would not seem like undue delay in anyone's mind and in any reasonable Canadian's mind, listening to the proceedings on or off TV.

National Citizenship Week
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

As an alternative the hon. member for Beaver River might wish to wait until tomorrow.

She has already indicated she wants me to ask if there is unanimous consent now. We have not heard from the Official Opposition. Perhaps she could put it off for 24 hours and bring it back tomorrow, having discussed it with the deputy whip for the Liberal Party.

It is entirely her right if she wants me to ask for unanimous consent. I will do it as soon as she sits down.

National Citizenship Week
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Reform

Deborah Grey Beaver River, AB

I did ask once, Mr. Speaker. That was my request.

Let me then put an amendment because the hon. member is upset about the technicalities of it. I would move an amendment:

That Standing Order 30, subsection (1), be amended.

And everything further to that. Yes, we would like unanimous consent but barring that we would be willing to send the matter to committee.

This is a very large thing, but in fact a very small thing for the House to deal with. There is no shame to it, and surely this is the place for us all to say: "Yes, we love this country". Maybe we should sing it right now. Who knows?

National Citizenship Week
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House to move the motion as indicated a moment ago?

National Citizenship Week
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

National Citizenship Week
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

No.

National Citizenship Week
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The House has heard the terms of the motion. There is not unanimous consent.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Paddy Torsney Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to table some 2,000 signatures that are supporting the efforts of Mrs. Debbie Mahaffy, my constituent, in her quest to have serial killer cards banned in Canada.

These cards are published by a number of publishers including Eclipse Comic Books, Rigamor Press and others.

Canadians do not want these trading cards in their communities. We abhor crimes of violence against persons and we believe that killer trading cards offer nothing positive for children or adults to admire or emulate, but rather contribute to violence.

It is my great pleasure to support this endeavour and the minister's motion today.