House of Commons Hansard #62 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was taxes.

Topics

Supply
Government Orders

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Karen Kraft Sloan York—Simcoe, ON

Madam Speaker, I have been listening with great interest and following the direction of the debate. It appears the Reform argument is coming from two possible areas. One is that we should have a very simple income tax form which I certainly agree with, but also that social policy measures should not be part of our income tax system.

If I were to go back to my constituents they would be appalled to learn the Reform Party is advocating banishing registered retirement savings plans. So many Canadians find this as the only way they can contribute toward their retirement years.

If you look at a registered retirement savings plan, as has already been noted, there is some complexity with it. If we did not have them on our forms it would indeed be a very simple form to fill out. It is clearly a direct social policy measure that the Canadian government is looking at helping Canadians save for their retirement.

I am appalled and I think my constituents would be appalled that the Reform Party is advocating something like this.

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Government Orders

12:05 p.m.

Reform

John Williams St. Albert, AB

Madam Speaker, let me put the matter straight. Is anybody in the Reform Party advocating that we eliminate RRSPs?

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12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

No.

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12:05 p.m.

Reform

John Williams St. Albert, AB

Thank you, Madam Speaker.

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12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Dennis Mills Broadview—Greenwood, ON

Madam Speaker, I am delighted to have the opportunity to participate in this debate. I believe I am on debate, Madam Speaker.

Business Of The House
Government Orders

May 3rd, 1994 / 12:10 p.m.

Kingston and the Islands
Ontario

Liberal

Peter Milliken Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Madam Speaker, on a point of order. There should be more comments.

I heard an hon. member say he got along fine without me and I am glad to see him again too.

Madam Speaker, there have been discussions among the parties and I think you will find there is unanimous consent for the following motion:

That, notwithstanding any standing order:

The Standing Committee on Finance is instructed to report Bill C-17, an act to amend certain statutes to implement provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 22, 1994, no later than May 25, 1994;

The report stage of the said bill shall be on May 26 and May 30, 1994 and at 15 minutes before the expiry of the time allotted for government business on May 30, 1994 the Speaker shall put all questions necessary to dispose of the report stage of the said bill without further debate and any divisions necessary shall be taken immediately;

The third reading stage of the said bill shall be on May 31, 1994 and at 15 minutes before the expiry of the time allotted for government business on May 31, 1994 the Speaker shall put all questions necessary to dispose of the third reading stage of the said bill without further debate and any divisions necessary shall be taken immediately.

Business Of The House
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

Does the hon. parliamentary secretary have the unanimous consent of the House to move the motion?

Business Of The House
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Madam Speaker, I would like to obtain some information.

Business Of The House
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

I give the floor to the hon. member for Roberval.

Business Of The House
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Madam Speaker, normally, 48 hours must pass between report stage and third reading, since amendments are not acceptable less than 48 hours before.

I would just like to make sure that if there are only 24 hours between report stage and third reading, the opposition's amendments would be in order if presented 24 hours in advance. It is just to make sure that the time provisions of our Standing Orders would of course apply to this motion.

Business Of The House
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Milliken Kingston and the Islands, ON

Madam Speaker, of course, when amendments are moved by any member in the House on this bill, they are considered by the Chair and the Speaker will decide at the beginning of the debate at report stage.

Regrettably, with this motion, we specified that the debate would begin 48 hours after the report, but we will have only 80

hours. So it will be a little harder for the Chair and also for members, but that is the arrangement we made.

The report from the committee will be received on May 25 and the debate will start on May 26. We have arranged for the debate to start on that day.

Those days have been designated because they are long days in order to give the opposition every opportunity to debate this bill on a reasonable basis. We could have the debate on a Friday but it is a short day. In order to lengthen the opportunities for the opposition, we have agreed to have the debate on the Thursday and Monday instead. That is the reason we have shortened the notice period for the report stage. However I think it is a reasonable compromise and that is the reason for it.

Business Of The House
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Madam Speaker, I would like to be sure that I understood correctly. It is not to create problems; on the contrary, it is to avoid them. I did not quite get what the hon. member was trying to convey to me, so I would ask him the question again.

Since there is only one day between consideration in committee and report stage, we would then leave it to the Speaker to decide whether or not he accepts the amendments presented. Accepting the motion as is without specifying whether amendments would be in order would mean that throughout the last day of the committee's work-I believe that I just said report stage and third reading; sorry, I meant that there would only be one day between committee stage and report stage. This means that no amendment would be acceptable on the last day, which would be basically contrary to the spirit of the rules of procedure of parliamentary committees.

Business Of The House
Government Orders

12:15 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Milliken Kingston and the Islands, ON

The standing orders would require that the notice of the amendments be given on the day after the report. So the report will be received on May 25 and presented in the House during Routine Proceedings that day. Obviously the notice of the amendments would have to be given before six o'clock that day to be considered the next day. Normally you have an extra day.

The Chair will have the amendments by six o'clock and will be able to work on its ruling overnight and communicate with the parties. If there are a lot of amendments it may mean an all-night work session for the Chair.

Business Of The House
Government Orders

12:15 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mrs. Ringuette-Maltais)

Does the hon. parliamentary secretary have the unanimous consent of the House to move the motion?

Business Of The House
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12:15 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.