House of Commons Hansard #85 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was agreement.

Topics

Parliamentary Pages
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

John O'Reilly Victoria—Haliburton, ON

Mr. Speaker, a few weeks ago I was asked by one of the parliamentary pages if I would sponsor a reception for them. Of all the members of Parliament they chose me. I was quite surprised and honoured.

Today I stand before the House to pay tribute to the pages because without them we would not be able to function as efficiently and as effectively as we do. These young women and young men are extremely bright, highly motivated and possess a particular charm which I hope each one of us has had the opportunity to experience.

I have on occasion had the opportunity to talk with many if not all the pages. I truly admire their commitment to their duties as well as their ability to thoroughly enjoy what they are doing. They have at times made my job a lot easier. I only hope I did not make their job more difficult.

As we will soon be saying goodbye to this particular group of pages, I wish them all continued success in their future endeavours. I ask my colleagues in the House to join me in an ovation to show our sincere appreciation.

Parliamentary Pages
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Jack Iyerak Anawak Nunatsiaq, NT

The lands of the Inuvialuit in the Western Arctic and those of the Blood Tribe in Alberta are a long way from any south sea island, but last week in both regions major aboriginal achievements were celebrated.

On June 5 the Inuvialuit celebrated the 10th anniversary of its land claim settlement. This historic agreement achieved a sharing of lands, resources and decision making that continues to benefit the Inuvialuit, the Northwest Territories and Canada.

On June 9 the Blood Tribe celebrated the first delivery of water under its irrigation project, an impressive project of tribal and government partnership which expands economic and employment opportunities for all.

I salute these positive examples of mutual respect, sharing, accommodation and co-operation. I congratulate the Inuvialuit and the Blood Tribe for their vision, drive and generosity, and I wish them continued success in their endeavours.

Jeunes Du Monde
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Guy Chrétien Frontenac, QC

Mr. Speaker, some collective gestures are welcomed with enthusiasm and admiration. Students in the town of Thetford, in my riding, have raised $5,500 in support of people in Rwanda and Burundi, showing their generosity and compassion.

This initiative sponsored by a youth group called Jeunes du Monde was such a success that these young people, mostly high school students, are challenging other Quebec areas and the rest of Canada to match their efforts. If the 600 high schools in Quebec were to meet this challenge, they would raise over$3.5 million on behalf of these two civil war-torn countries.

The Thetford experience may only be a drop in the ocean, but it is small gestures like this one which change the world.

Young Offenders Act
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Cliff Breitkreuz Yellowhead, AB

Mr. Speaker, Julian Waites was a boy who found himself in trouble with the law. He faced over 40 charges in youth court, mostly theft related. He played the Young Offenders Act like a harp knowing precisely which strings he could pull and when.

His mother, Mary, desperately wanted the courts to punish her son so he would be deterred from repeat offending. She wanted the courts to give him a jail sentence, send him to work camps, anything that would make the young boy think twice about repeat offending.

Julian was incorrigible. He resisted help from his family and the law allowed him to continue his life of crime. Today Julian Waites faces charges of sexual assault, assault with a weapon, and uttering threats.

Mrs. Waites largely blames the inadequacies of the Young Offenders Act for her son's current troubles. He was not punished for the crimes he committed as a youth and his mother says the Young Offenders Act actually encouraged him to repeat offend. Mrs. Waites is convinced that a tougher Young Offenders Act might have given her son a chance at a normal life.

Young Offenders Act
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Brenda Chamberlain Guelph—Wellington, ON

Mr. Speaker, recent polls have confirmed that Canadians are demanding action on crime and violence.

I applaud the Minister of Justice for his commitment to ensuring that Canadians will live without fear for their personal safety.

The red book has outlined many measures which will ensure our safety and security. A tough line on violence, stricter penalties, the reform of the Young Offenders Act and further control of violent pornography were all included in our campaign promises.

The government must continue to take the lead on addressing root causes of crime. Unemployment, hopelessness, the breakdown of families and the use of illegal drugs all contribute to a more violent and unsafe society.

Canadians are a non-violent and peace loving people. We must continue to respond with comprehensive, effective approaches to the issues of crime and punishment.

The Environment
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Karen Kraft Sloan York—Simcoe, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have had the pleasure of receiving packages of comments from visiting students from St. Patrick's School in Schomberg and Morning Glory Public School in Pefferlaw. Both are located in my riding of York-Simcoe.

Overwhelmingly these young people have indicated that the environment is their number one concern. Here is a sample of some of their comments: "Our environment is precious". "People should be aware of the pollution they cause". "The environment is important to look at first because we may not have much time left".

Gun Control
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Zed Fundy Royal, NB

Mr. Speaker, our office has received numerous letters, petitions and phone calls from concerned constituents in New Brunswick about speculation regarding further regulations for rifles and guns. There is a great deal of misinformation being circulated with regard to the government's intention.

The government is considering options that will address the issue in a fair and responsible matter. These include tough jail sentences for gun related crimes, increased border controls to combat smuggling, a universal firearms registration system to track gun ownership, additional restrictions on handguns, a possible ban on military assault weapons and tighter controls on the sale of ammunition.

I understand the government does not want to ban ordinary rifles and shotguns owned by law-abiding citizens. In fact the Minister of Justice stated in the House last week that he had no desire to unnecessarily inconvenience responsible gun owners

such as farmers and hunters who use firearms for lawful purposes.

I urge the Minister of Justice to maintain this rational and sensible approach on measures he will introduce to combat gun related crimes.

The Stanley Cup
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Paul Marchand Québec-Est, QC

Mr. Speaker, tonight Quebecers and Canadians who are hockey fans will be able to watch the seventh and final match of the Stanley Cup playoffs between the Vancouver Canucks and the New York Rangers.

Having seen many similar events in Quebec since the Montréal Canadiens won the Stanley Cup some 24 times, and in spite of all political differences that oppose us periodically, we of the Bloc Quebecois wish to share with the people of Vancouver and of British Columbia their enthusiasm in the quest for their first Stanley Cup since 1915.

How remarkable that hockey once again is fostering good relations between peoples of different origins and cultures. In the name of all Quebecers for whom hockey is the object of great national pride, we want to express to all our friends in British Columbia the very best of chances tonight.

Go Canucks, go.

The Stanley Cup
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Canada Council
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Jan Brown Calgary Southeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, on a different topic and graver note, a homosexual group funded by the federal government is guilty of gross intolerance toward a Toronto Sun columnist.

Last December Christina Blizzard of the Sun wrote a story questioning whether public funding should be going to Buddies in Bad Times Theatre in Toronto, a group which advertises live sex acts and violent sado-masochistic seminars.

The actors reacted by encouraging members to spit on Ms. Blizzard. They tried to storm the Sun Building to present her with a mock award depicting a bloody mallet. In her own neighbourhood they erected wanted posters of her filled with lies and allegations.

They directed a violent play against Ms. Blizzard entitled "Dinner with Christina" which suggested that what she and other people like her they really needed was to be raped late at night in an alley. This disgusting behaviour by Buddies in Bad Times was made possible by $60,000 a year in Canada Council grants.

I urge the minister not to hide behind the arms length principle and immediately initiate an evaluation of the organizations currently funded by the Canada Council.

Serial Killer Cards
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Larry McCormick Hastings—Frontenac—Lennox And Addington, ON

Mr. Speaker, we as parliamentarians must do everything possible to ban the sale and distribution in Canada of serial killer cards and board games intended for children. I rise to say that I am greatly encouraged by steps that the Minister of Justice has taken in this regard. By his actions, the minister has shown that this government is committed to taking measures that will protect our children from exposure to material that glorifies violence, cruelty and horror.

On behalf of the constituents of Hastings-Frontenac-Lennox and Addington, I call on the members of the justice committee to amend the customs and tariffs legislation to prohibit the importation of serial killer cards into Canada.

Let us try to put an end to these kinds of perverted, profit motivated, marketing gimmicks aimed at corrupting the minds of our children.

First Nations
Statements By Members

June 14th, 1994 / 2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Anna Terrana Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, as a Vancouverite let me thank the Bloc Quebecois for my constituents in Vancouver East for supporting the Canucks. Go Canucks go.

On Friday, I had the privilege of attending a convocation ceremony in Kamloops, B.C. Fifteen aboriginal people, members of the Shuswap band, earned Bachelor of Arts degrees from Simon Fraser University. They were the first graduates of a joint program established between the Secwepemc Cultural Education Society and Simon Fraser University, which allows them to do their studies in Kamloops.

It was an emotional but very proud event. I am glad to inform the House that there are now 300 students enrolled in the program and that at the ceremony the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development reaffirmed support for such programs by the federal government. This is just one of the ways in which the First Nations are continuing to make their members independent. Let me congratulate the Shuswap band, the Secwepemc Cultural Education Society and Simon Fraser University for such an endeavour.

Haiti
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Bloc

Lucien Bouchard Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the federal government has asked Canadian nationals to leave Haiti by June 25, in other words, before air communications between Canada and Haiti are suspended. However, we still do not know Ottawa's position on the use of military intervention to drive out the junta and allow the return of president Aristide.

I want to ask the Minister of Foreign Affairs to indicate whether Canada is among the countries that are putting pressure on the United States to send a force for military intervention in Haiti.

Haiti
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Michel
Québec

Liberal

André Ouellet Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the Leader of the Opposition asked a similar question some time ago, when he spoke out in favour of military intervention. We prefer a peaceful solution. We want to avoid killing people, if at all possible. There has already been too much of that in Haiti. We hope that we will be able to make the military listen to reason and persuade them to leave and let president Aristide come back to his country, but without endangering the lives of the Haitian people who are now very vulnerable, in a situation that could degenerate into armed conflict.