House of Commons Hansard #254 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was housing.

Topics

National Unity
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Lethbridge
Alberta

Reform

Ray Speaker Lethbridge

Mr. Speaker, on Monday some 49.5 per cent of Quebeckers who voted yes to separation did so because they believe that status quo federalism is bankrupt and the government is incapable of carrying out necessary reforms. Others voted yes because they believed the claims of the separatist leadership that when countries split apart the process is quick, painless, and amicable.

The best way of combating these twin errors is for Canadian federalists to adopt a two-track approach. First we must advocate and implement a new confederation consisting of reforms that will decentralize the Canadian federal system. The Reform Party's 20-point new confederation proposal released several weeks ago outlines one method of doing this.

The Reform Party will also pursue a second stream intended to outline a formal Canadian position on the terms and conditions of separation if ever necessary. Such a position will make crystal clear to all concerned exactly what trials would be involved should the separatists ever attempt to lead Quebec out of Canada.

By outlining a more attractive vision-

National Unity
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Saint-Denis.

Quebec Economy
Statements By Members

November 3rd, 1995 / 11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Eleni Bakopanos Saint-Denis, QC

Mr. Speaker, Quebecers have quickly turned the page on the proposal for a separate Quebec, as we learned this morning from a SOM-Le Soleil-Radio-Québec poll.

The poll, which was conducted between October 31 and November 2 among 812 people from all regions of Quebec, shows that 73 per cent of respondents want the Quebec government to participate in the renewal of the Canadian federation.

The poll also shows that Quebecers give priority to unemployment and deficit reduction as the first tasks that the federal government should tackle. Only 16 per cent of respondents see the renewal of federalism as a priority.

The people of Quebec have spoken once again. Let us hope that PQ and Bloc members will set their obsessions aside and address people's priorities.

Yves Blais
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Assad Gatineau—La Lièvre, QC

Mr. Speaker, there is only one word to describe the comments made by Yves Blais, the PQ's regional delegate in the Outaouais, and that is blackmail.

When he visited the Outaouais in June, Mr. Parizeau made a commitment to give $15 million to the Outaouais economic diversification society.

Mr. Blais said that only two promises were conditional on achieving sovereignty: the one I just mentioned and the promise to hire federal public servants living in Quebec.

Mr. Blais is making up excuses to justify his lack of respect for the people of the Outaouais who voted no to Quebec separation. After the regrettable remarks made by his leader, the PQ member is showing us another hidden side of the separatist movement.

Quebec
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Maurice Godin Châteauguay, QC

Mr. Speaker, in the wake of the Quebec referendum, the Canadian provinces' great unanimity and unconditional declarations of love for Quebec have given way to backtracking and to a total lack of consensus. Once again, Quebec has been left to its own devices and its demands have been ignored.

Premiers Filmon and Romanow want to take this opportunity to make cosmetic changes to the constitution. Premiers Klein and Harcourt, however, would rather wait until 1997 before doing anything. And what about the ineffable Clyde Wells, who is still incapable of understanding what Quebec is all about?

As for the Prime Minister of Canada, he will certainly not be the one to propose comprehensive changes. Is he even willing to consider Quebec's legitimate aspirations, or does he simply intend to put Quebec in its place?

Gun Control
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Reform

Jack Ramsay Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, I am aghast at the seeming arrogance of the Minister of Justice.

First he neglects to adequately consult his provincial counterparts and aboriginal representatives on Bill C-68, while claiming otherwise. Then he dismisses the concerns of the rural members of his own caucus. Next he grabs for himself the power to prohibit any firearm that in his opinion is not reasonable for use in hunting or sporting purposes.

During report stage of Bill C-68 the justice minister changed one of his own colleague's amendments, which would have limited the autocratic powers of the minister. The justice minister's extensive knowledge about firearms banned the Olympic shooting pistol.

For the first time in history the justice minister has granted the federal government the power to commence proceedings under the Criminal Code, clearly infringing on provincial jurisdiction.

Finally, the minister on his own has rendered the Senate useless. He has said that even if the Senate dares to amend his gun legislation he will not accept it.

Confidence, Mr. Speaker? No, I say arrogance.

Canada Remembers
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Paul Zed Fundy Royal, NB

Mr. Speaker, on October 23 I had the distinct pleasure of presenting awards to the Minto Elementary and Junior High School and Chipman Junior-Senior High School in Queen's county, New Brunswick. They placed first and second for their contributions to the Canada Remembers contest in Atlantic Canada.

The contest was part of the Canada Remembers program. It encouraged all junior and senior high schools to participate in the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the second world war.

It is this kind of community spirit which has been demonstrated in Minto and Chipman, New Brunswick which has led to the success of the Canada Remembers program and the successful commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the second world war.

I am extremely proud of the commitment demonstrated by the students. All of us congratulate them. We are very proud of their contributions.

Democracy
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday on Téléjournal , the Radio-Canada news program, the Minister of Justice clearly mentioned the possibility of resurrecting a federal power that has not been used for more than half a century, the federal government's power of reservation and disallowance, to try and prevent Quebecers from voting when they see fit on their political future.

Does the Deputy Prime Minister agree it is inconceivable the federal government should try to use a power that has become obsolete, as the Supreme Court of Canada admitted, to prevent Quebecers from voting democratically on their political future?

Democracy
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada

Mr. Speaker, Quebecers made a clear choice Monday night. Even the Leader of the Opposition agreed that the democratic position was to accept the fact that they voted no to separation. In Quebec, the Parti Quebecois was elected with a majority of one-quarter point. And in this case, the Leader of the Opposition made it quite clear he would not challenge the referendum results. I think that if his members have any respect for democracy, they should not challenge them either.

The best way to prevent a second referendum is to renew federalism, and that is what 73 per cent of the population wants, according to a poll released today.

Democracy
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am serious. The federal Minister of Justice says the federal government wants or may wish to use the power of disallowance to go over the head of the Quebec National Assembly. The minister is off topic and using all kinds of excuses to try to evade the issue.

How could the federal government even consider ignoring the powers of the Quebec National Assembly by using a power that, according to the Supreme Court, has become obsolete? Are we to understand that with this government, democracy comes second to federalism?

Democracy
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, let us hope the Parti Quebecois and the Bloc Quebecois respect democracy. Because if they have the slightest respect for democracy, they will accept the outcome of the vote last Monday, and they will abide by the wishes of 73 per cent of Quebecers who want the Quebec government to work towards renewing federalism. That is democracy. Democracy spoke Monday night, and the Parti Quebecois should listen.

Democracy
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Mr. Speaker, this from the Deputy Prime Minister of a government that, I may remind you, was formed by the party that introduced the War Measures Act in Quebec in 1970. We know your democratic propensities. A party that, through its Minister of Justice, tells us it will use a power now obsolete, the power of disallowance, to flout the authority of the Quebec National Assembly and ignore its decisions. And this party, which according to the Prime Minister would not have respected the results of the referendum, now wants to give us a lesson in democracy.

Democracy
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

An hon. member

The nerve.

Democracy
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Are we to understand that because they have nothing to propose, because the provincial Premiers are starting to reconsider, because the government has no plan and because they know that next time, the Yes side will win, the government is desperate, and its only option is to deny the democratic system, either through the power of disallowance or by going before the courts?

Democracy
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I wonder what Anita Martinez thinks of democracy according to the Parti Quebecois. Anita Martinez is a 23 year old worker in Quebec who was accused by the Deputy Premier of Quebec of not being a real Quebecer.

Those people over there want to teach us a lesson in democracy, but we respect the results and we respect the fact that whether it is cast by a Nunez, a Martinez or a Lucien Bouchard, a vote is a vote, and the results of Monday night's democratic vote should be respected by the Parti Quebecois and the Bloc Quebecois.