House of Commons Hansard #255 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was federal.

Topics

Prime Minister
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Darrel Stinson Okanagan—Shuswap, BC

In opposition, leader Jean Chrétien-

Prime Minister
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Burnaby-Kingsway.

Indonesia
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson Burnaby—Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, December 7 of this year will mark 20 years since Indonesia illegally invaded East Timor and began a campaign of genocide and human rights violations. This November 12 will be the fourth anniversary of the Dili massacre.

Over the past two months repression has intensified as Indonesia tries to suppress protest in advance of these anniversaries and before the upcoming visit of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Several hundred people have been arrested and it is feared they are being tortured. Others have been killed.

Given all of this, it is totally inappropriate for the Minister for International Trade to be planning a trade visit to Indonesia for November 11 on his way to the APEC summit in Japan.

This trip by the Minister for International Trade on the very eve of the Dili massacre anniversary demonstrates once again the complete moral bankruptcy of Canada's foreign policy.

I urge members of the House to support the New Democratic Party's proposal to end Canadian aid and arms sales to the Government of Indonesia and I urge the minister to reconsider his visit.

First Nations
Statements By Members

November 6th, 1995 / 2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Raymond Bonin Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to ask my colleagues to join with me in congratulating these aboriginal Canadian communities: the James Bay Cree, the Walpole Island First Nations and the Sanikiluak Inuit community.

Recently these three communities were honoured by the United Nations for their achievements in overcoming great hardships to improve the quality of life of the members of their communities.

As recipients of the United Nations award "We the Peoples" our three aboriginal communities were held up as models to others facing hardships. The award serves as a testimony to the ability of

communities to come together under a common banner to promote positive change in the harshest of circumstances.

I thank the peoples of the James Bay Cree, the Walpole Island First Nations and the Sanikiluak Inuit community for reinforcing our hope and resolve in bettering the lives of aboriginal Canadians from coast to coast.

The Late Yitzhak Rabin
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Sarkis Assadourian Don Valley North, ON

Mr. Speaker, one who kills in the name of morality kills nothing except one's own morality.

The world has suffered the loss of a great peacemaker. Mindless violence has claimed a leader whose foresight and courage led his nation from the twisted path of endless conflict and pointed it toward the road to peace.

I was honoured to nominate Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin for the Nobel Peace Prize in January 1994 and overjoyed when he was awarded that honour in December 1994.

Yitzhak Rabin was a soldier who fought for his country and yet he grew to realize that the only solution was to become a soldier for peace. He survived conflict as a soldier but died as a soldier of peace.

When I met him last year in Canada he promised he would continue to work toward a lasting peace.

I extend my deepest condolences to Mrs. Rabin, her family and the nation of Israel.

The Late Yitzhak Rabin
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, this evening at the Beth Israel synagogue in Peterborough people of all faiths will be meeting to mourn and remember Mr. Yitzhak Rabin.

I met Mr. Rabin once. He impressed me greatly.

Israel is an extraordinarily democratic nation. The struggles of the great majority of Israelis to solve their enormous problems through the democratic process are an example to us all.

Mr. Rabin's career was a key thread in the fabric of a democratic Israel from its birth to today. He showed us the path of moderation is not a soft option. It is a tough road beset by the pitfalls and traps of extremists. It is a path often shrouded by the fogs of apathy.

Our thoughts are with Mr. Rabin's family and the state of Israel at this difficult and tragic time.

The Economy
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Dale Johnston Wetaskiwin, AB

Mr. Speaker, the government's head in the sand approach to running the country must stop. Our debt is $567 billion and Stats Canada reports the October jobless rate increased to 9.4 per cent.

The Pollyannas across the way no doubt have been told: "Don't worry, be happy; the economy is improving". The 65,000 new entrants into the job market will not be happy until they find a job.

The increase would have been even higher if it were not for the spinoff from the resurgence of the U.S. economy. While the Prime Minister and his cabinet were perfecting their do-nothing routine during the referendum, they failed to realize the status quo approach to the economy will bring Canada even closer to financial collapse.

The minister of HRD's orchestrated leaks about new job creation schemes show he is still clinging to the socialist notion that governments can create jobs. History has proven this approach to be an unmitigated failure.

Why does the government not get out of the way so the private sector can create some real jobs?

Tragic Death Of Prime Minister Of Israel
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, following the tragic death, two days ago, of Yitzhak Rabin, Israel and the whole international community have lost a great statesman.

Yitzhak Rabin was one of the main architects of the peace process in the Middle East. His death must not end the hope for lasting peace between Israel and its Arab neighbours.

Yitzhak Rabin was like a reflection of his country and of the whole Middle East. Born in a country under foreign control, he fought for national independence before becoming his country's defence chief of staff, and eventually ambassador, prime minister and peacemaker. It is thanks to his dedication to peace if, in recent years, we witnessed a rapprochement between Israel and its Arab neighbours.

More than anything else in his distinguished career, Yitzhak Rabin will be remembered as a man of peace who was loved by his people, by neighbouring nations, and by us all.

The Late Yitzhak Rabin
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Rey D. Pagtakhan Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, only two years ago Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin proclaimed to the world: "Enough of blood and tears. Enough".

Today citizens of the world remember those courageous words as they mourn the tragic loss of this great peacemaker. It is indeed ironic that a man of peace should be taken from the world so violently.

Today as we mourn his death we also celebrate his life. We shall continue to remember him for the legacy he has left behind: peace in the Middle East which will be treasured by every child who comes of age in a better world.

Mr. Rabin knew the soul of his people and his people came to him for leadership in war and in peace.

As we grieve with his family and his nation, let us resolve that his death shall not still the life of peace.

The Late Yitzhak Rabin
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Jane Stewart Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, when a man of war becomes a general of peace, we have surely witnessed a miracle. When a man can turn a hawk into a dove, we have surely witnessed a miracle. When a man can learn to give instead of take, we have surely witnessed a miracle.

This miracle will be remembered as Yitzhak Rabin. The history he has written will become a beacon of hope, a symbol of peace, a miracle of humanity for all the world to share.

As but one who has watched his leadership and listened to his words, I share the grief, I feel the sorrow and I know we have lost someone rare.

Government Spending
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

John Williams St. Albert, AB

Mr. Speaker, the first set of supplementary estimates was tabled last week and with these estimates the government is proposing $936 million in new spending; spending that only six months ago was unforeseen, unimagined and completely unanticipated by the government.

I am appalled by some of this spending. The government's failure to collect information and its efforts to hide information have led to an expensive Somalia inquiry budgeted at $7.4 million. This could have been, would have been and should have been avoided if the Department of National Defence had done its job correctly.

There is a $4 million subsidy to Canada Post Corporation for providing services to the north. I thought Canadian postage rates are supposed to pay for delivery everywhere in Canada. Does Canada Post need an additional $4 million subsidy to do the job it is already paid to do?

Pharmacy Awareness Week
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to bring to the attention of all Canadians that November 1 to 7 is Pharmacy Awareness Week.

Each year there are 12,500 deaths, two million lost work days, and $150 million in lost earnings in Canada because people do not take their medications properly.

The purpose of Pharmacy Awareness Week is to recognize the important role pharmacists play in health care, particularly in the use of medication. It also serves to encourage a dialogue between pharmacists and their patients on the proper and safe consumption of prescription drugs. Pharmacy Awareness Week is an opportunity for patients and pharmacists to reduce the risk involved with unsafe medication consumption.

I recognize the efforts of pharmacists in the field of health and I encourage them to continue their efforts to ensure that medications and their proper use continue to improve the good health of all Canadians.

The Constitution
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, last Wednesday, in response to a question, the Prime Minister said he was in favour of a veto right, not for the Government of Quebec but for Quebecers.

When asked about this last week, both the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs and the Deputy Prime Minister were unable to explain what the Prime Minister meant.

Could the Minister of Justice explain what the Prime Minister means when he talks about a veto right for Quebecers?

The Constitution
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada

Mr. Speaker, last week we said that the best way by far to give Quebecers the vote was to proceed with the good government we had started to put in place and implement the changes and reforms that were

clearly demanded by the public. That was the best way to prevent the next referendum.

The Constitution
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I directed my question to the Minister of Justice because I thought that directing it to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs would not give us more of an answer than we had last week.

I will again put my question to the Minister of Justice. Could he confirm his government's plans to table legislation in the House of Commons authorizing federal referendums in five regions in Canada, including Quebec, for the purpose of amending the constitution?