House of Commons Hansard #271 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was jobs.

Topics

Royal Arms Of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Laval West
Québec

Liberal

Michel Dupuy Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, changes in the coat of arms are not unusual. They have taken place over the years. We witness now, somewhat belatedly, another change.

If the member wants to make a great show of it, I would suggest he go outside and ride on the back of the unicorn.

Royal Arms Of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Reform

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley East, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is always a pleasure to follow such a class act as this low life minister.

Royal Arms Of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh. Oh.

Royal Arms Of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

The Speaker

Colleagues, as much as possible we should refrain from personal attacks. I ask all hon. members to be very judicious in their choice of words.

I return to the hon. member for Fraser Valley East and ask him to put his question.

Royal Arms Of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Reform

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley East, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government's arrogance typified in that answer seems to know no bounds. First it uses the old Mulroney tactics of ramming through constitutional vetoes and distinct society status when the Canadian people have not been consulted. Now it wants to change the Canadian Coat of Arms, waiting for a convenient moment when it thinks it can sneak it through Parliament past our eyes.

Why is the government now sneaking through these changes to the Canadian Coat of Arms and why is it changing the fundamental symbols of the country at a time when we are trying to keep it tied together?

Royal Arms Of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Laval West
Québec

Liberal

Michel Dupuy Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, I explained these changes were made in 1987. We are not currently doing anything. We are printing booklets giving the symbols of Canada all across Canada.

One reason, as I understand it, the coat of arms was changed in 1987 was to add "to build a better country". If this is irrelevant today, I profoundly disagree. Our colleagues should work for a better country, but they do not.

Unemployment Insurance Reform
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Antoine Dubé Lévis, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is directed to the Minister of Human Resources Development.

As we know now, the minister's reforms will triple the number of hours required to be eligible for unemployment insurance for the first time, from 300 to 910 hours. In so doing, the minister penalizes thousands of young people who are trying very hard to get into the labour market as well as thousands of women who want to go back to work, because they will need more than six months of full time work to qualify.

Will the minister admit that all workers who lose their jobs and apply for unemployment insurance for the first time after having worked less than 18 hours a week for one year, will not be eligible for benefits, even if they paid premiums during that time?

Unemployment Insurance Reform
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Winnipeg South Centre
Manitoba

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy Minister of Human Resources Development and Minister of Western Economic Diversification

Mr. Speaker, it is very interesting that the question cited as reference the report of seasonal workers. That same report recommended strongly that there be stronger eligibility requirements for young people because it was noticed that many young people were simply using a minimum amount of work to get into the system and therefore becoming dependent on cycles year after year.

Our response has been very clearly twofold. First, we have shifted, as the hon. member should know, to a much stronger series of measures to help people, including young people, get back in the job market quickly and effectively.

Second, we have increased our budget for youth employment by 15 per cent this year. In the first year of operation of a youth internship we already have 25,000 young people working in business to make that transition. Our belief is to use positive, active measures to help our young people get into the workforce.

Furthermore, there is one important thing the hon member should know but does not. We are extending those active measures to people who have paid into the new employment insurance system for a period of three years. All those employment measures are available even to those who have exhausted their claims. They will now have the benefit of our employment measures.

Unemployment Insurance Reform
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Antoine Dubé Lévis, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is really too bad that the Minister of Human Resources Development considers unemployment insurance as a drug.

I would like to ask a question from a different perspective. Does the minister agree that individuals who work less than 490 hours annually will never be eligible for unemployment insurance although they have to pay premiums, which has not been the case so far?

Unemployment Insurance Reform
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Winnipeg South Centre
Manitoba

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy Minister of Human Resources Development and Minister of Western Economic Diversification

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member has totally and completely misunderstood the major fundamental thrust.

This has been debated for many years. We have finally said the old system which purely provided benefits was not sufficient to help people get back to work. We have shifted those resources into effective measures of employment, things like the self-employment measure, things like the development of a wage supplement to provide for small business.

We are using those measures to help people get back to work, to make up those hours because we happen to believe that everyone would rather work than simply stay on benefits. We are now giving them the means to achieve that goal.

Aboriginal Youth
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Judy Bethel Edmonton East, AB

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Secretary of State for Training and Youth.

At an aboriginal youth forum I recently held in Edmonton East one of the concerns expressed was the high rate of unemployment among aboriginal youth. Participants felt it was crucial to nurture and develop the talent of our aboriginal youth.

What initiatives has the Department of Human Resources Development taken to assist urban aboriginal youth successfully enter the workplace?

Aboriginal Youth
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Western Arctic
Northwest Territories

Liberal

Ethel Blondin-Andrew Secretary of State (Training and Youth)

Mr. Speaker, the government is committed to helping aboriginal youth join the workforce successfully. We are actively assisting them to help gain valuable work experience.

On October 16 Human Resources Development Canada announced the latest project, a series of 16 First Nations youth service projects. The Assembly of First Nations will work in partnership

with Youth Service Canada HRD to develop youth service projects which meet the needs of these aboriginal youth.

This initiative will have a total of 240 participants and will cost approximately $2 million.

Royal Arms Of Canada
Oral Question Period

December 5th, 1995 / 2:50 p.m.

Reform

Preston Manning Calgary Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, we have a rather curious turn of events here today.

Earlier last week the government in introducing this distinct society motion said it attached great importance to symbolism, even symbolic statements.

Now we have a proposed change in the Canadian coat of arms, a Canadian symbol, and the heritage minister who is supposed to be the guardian of these things dismisses it as inconsequential.

To whom does he believe this Canadian symbol belongs, to the sovereign, to the government, to some Liberal backbencher or to the people of Canada?

Royal Arms Of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Laval West
Québec

Liberal

Michel Dupuy Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, it certainly belongs to the people of Canada, all of us, but particular to those who believe in what is written on the coat of arms: "To build a better country".

I hope the Reform Party believes in it and will support the new coat of arms.

Royal Arms Of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Reform

Preston Manning Calgary Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, if it is true what the minister says, that the coat of arms belongs to the people of Canada and he is committed to building a better country, why are the people of Canada not consulted and involved in changes to the Canadian coat of arms?