House of Commons Hansard #202 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was dairy.

Topics

Bovine Somatotropin
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Guy Chrétien Frontenac, QC

Mr. Speaker, will the Minister of Agriculture recognize that his moratorium is totally useless, since there is no control over the destination and use of somatotropin once it has gone through Customs at the border, thus creating a situation which could bring a very promising Canadian industry into disrepute?

Bovine Somatotropin
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Regina—Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

As the hon. gentleman knows, under the existing law of Canada, unless and until the Department of Health has issued a notice of compliance-which has not occurred to date, because the Department of Health is still examining the issue and has not come to a decision-and comes to a decision that is favourable and notice of compliance is issued in due course, then the sale of rBST in Canada is illegal. We have undertaken to investigate allegations of its use presently unauthorized in Canada. We will report the findings of the investigation when they are available.

I want to assure the hon. gentlemen that I and many members on the government side share his concern about the health and strength of the Canadian dairy industry. We are anxious to do everything we can.

Child-Proof Lighters
Oral Question Period

May 16th, 1995 / 2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Rey D. Pagtakhan Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health.

The 75-day allotted period for public comment on the draft regulations requiring cigarette lighters to be equipped with child-resistant safety locks has been complied with following publication in part I of the Canada Gazette . Canadians applaud this government initiative.

When will the new regulations come into force? And can the minister assure Canadians that retailers will have to remove from their shelves at that time, not one day later, all remaining cigarette lighters that are a danger to children?

Child-Proof Lighters
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Sudbury
Ontario

Liberal

Diane Marleau Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the regulations banning non-child-proof disposable lighters will come into effect in the middle of June. Yes, not one day's grace will be given to any retailer in terms of the disposal of these unsafe lighters.

It is a pity that the regulatory process has taken so much time to come forward and bring in the regulations. In the time it has taken, already more children have lost their lives. I would ask the retailers, as much as possible, to get rid of those particular lighters today, because as of the middle of June they will be illegal.

Contracting Guidelines
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Reform

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley East, BC

Mr. Speaker, Parkins communication recently won a media monitoring contract worth $15,000 a month from Canada Communications Group. Yet the company failed to meet the mandatory requirements for the contract, including demonstrated experience, quality control, or an office in the capital region. They did not even have a listed telephone number.

The contract was issued mainly because Parkins agreed to hire contract workers from CCG, the very firm that awarded the contract. That is an obvious conflict of interest.

Why has the government chosen to ignore its own contracting guidelines in awarding this contract?

Contracting Guidelines
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Cape Breton—East Richmond
Nova Scotia

Liberal

David Dingwall Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Mr. Speaker, yes, the hon. member is quite correct. A contract was awarded on January 24, 1995. The hon. member forgot to tell the House that six proposals were received and this one was selected.

We did have a file review by an internal audit group. The review indicated there were no irregularities in the contracting process. I would suggest that if the hon. member has evidence to the contrary he should share the evidence with members of the House so we could have a thorough investigation.

Contracting Guidelines
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Reform

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley East, BC

Mr. Speaker, I did list a few of the problems with the contract. The contractor was not qualified. He did not meet the mandatory requirements. He should not even have been considered for the contract.

He had an audit done, of course within his own department. An independent audit, which is like an independent ethics counsellor, something the government has trouble with, should be considered when there is this type of contract, an obvious conflict of interest.

Will the government at least release the inside audit so we can all have a look at it and perhaps reopen the bidding process?

Contracting Guidelines
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Cape Breton—East Richmond
Nova Scotia

Liberal

David Dingwall Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Mr. Speaker, the House should be aware that the hon. member is basing these allegations on a very reputable source he has been able to come up with in the last number of weeks. That source, of course, is Frank magazine.

I want to suggest to the hon. member that my department does in excess of 350,000 contracts a year, and at any given time there will be a number of individuals who are not very pleased with the fact that they have not won a contract. Six proposals were submitted and this one was selected based upon the best value for the taxpayer's dollar.

I think the particular awarding of the contract has been done appropriately, and the investigations I have been able to come up with confirm that. However, if the hon. member does have something substantive, other than references to Frank magazine, I suggest he put up, or he knows what he should do-shut up.

Sega Company Of Japan
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, on January 13, the CRTC issued a new exemption order concerning the Japanese company SEGA, which is about to offer its video game service on cable television. Yet, the CRTC admitted that this was a broadcast service.

Given the consequences of the exemption order granted to the Japanese company SEGA, can the Minister of Industry tell us if his government intends to set up a working group to review that decision, as was done in the case of Power DirecTv?

Sega Company Of Japan
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I take note the question. I will provide an answer to the hon. member as soon as I get it.

Sega Company Of Japan
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski—Témiscouata, QC

Mr. Speaker, given the minister's answer, I would like to know if, in the event that a working group is set up to review the exemption, the minister will pledge that the committee will hold public hearings, so that all those who want to express their views on this issue will be able to do so?

Sega Company Of Japan
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

The Speaker

I am sorry, but since this is a hypothetical question, it cannot be allowed.

Gun Control
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Jack Ramsay Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, we have been told that the Minister of Justice did not consult adequately with the governments of the three prairie provinces or the two territories regarding Bill C-68 and that he did not adequately consult with the James Bay Cree, the Council for Yukon Indians, or the Métis. Last night we were told by Chief Mercredi that the minister absolutely did not consult with the Assembly of First Nations.

I ask the Minister of Justice, did he or did he not consult with the Assembly of First Nations on Bill C-68?

Gun Control
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, for the last 12 months the Department of Justice and in fact this minister personally have done little else except consult with respect to firearms legislation.

The fact is that there are some, perhaps including the hon. member, who define consultation as doing exactly what they think we ought to do.

The legislation we have put before the House reflects the broad and careful consultation with the wide variety of interests on this topic. The work of the committee, which is now under way and to which the member contributes as an active and hard-working member, is completing that process of listening carefully to the views of Canadians on these important matters.

Gun Control
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Jack Ramsay Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, I do not know how many times we have to ask the justice minister for a straightforward answer to a straightforward question.

On November 30, 1994, the Minister of Justice, while tabling the proposals to Bill C-68, said "Let me make it very clear, the process of consultation leading to legislation is now over". That was back in November.

I ask the Minister of Justice one more time: Inasmuch as he has failed to adequately consult the Yukon Indians, the James Bay Cree, or the First Nations in the prescribed manner, how can he say he has not violated the constitutional rights of these people?