House of Commons Hansard #228 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Old Age Security
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Maurice Dumas Argenteuil—Papineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance. In his last budget, the Minister of Finance announced that he would need to proceed this autumn with the review of the Canada pension plan. There is now some urgency for the government to submit a reform plan for old age pensions. That document is close to a year overdue.

What is keeping the Finance Minister from making public his government's intentions with respect to old age pensions? What does the federal government have up its sleeve for older Canadians?

Old Age Security
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Minister of Finance and Minister responsible for the Federal Office of Regional Development-Quebec

Mr. Speaker, in both departments, Human Resources Development and Finance, we are still involved in examining the document. We will release it as soon as it is ready. The member across the way has my assurance that the Liberals were the party that created our social programs and the Liberals will be the party to preserve them.

Old Age Security
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Maurice Dumas Argenteuil—Papineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, are we to understand from the attitude of the Minister of Finance that he is doing the same with seniors as he is doing with Canadians as a whole, that is putting off delivering the bad news until after the referendum?

Old Age Security
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

An hon. member

That is exactly it.

Old Age Security
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Minister of Finance and Minister responsible for the Federal Office of Regional Development-Quebec

Mr. Speaker, we were very clear in the last budget on the reforms that will be necessary. It is our intention to consult Canadians on these reforms.

If the hon. member wishes to talk about concealing things, since you bring up the matter, where are the Fluet-Lefebvre studies? Where are the Mathews studies? Where are all the studies Mr. Le Hir commissioned? If the hon. member wishes to talk about

concealing things, tell us what the true consequences of the referendum will be.

Capital Punishment
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, in Atlantic Canada I was told that 70 per cent of Atlantic Canadians support a return to capital punishment and a June survey stated that 69 per cent of all Canadians agree.

The justice minister has continually stated that he consults and follows the wishes of Canadians. The justice minister claimed high moral ground on firearms control because he said police supported this legislation.

Since Atlantic Canadians, police officers and all Canadians are demanding a binding referendum on capital punishment, will the justice minister be consistent in his operations and offer a binding referendum to citizens?

Capital Punishment
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I wonder as a matter of logic if I can deduce from the hon. member's question that he is now prepared to support the gun control proposals put forward by this government. Would he do that?

The fundamental objective of this government as we said in the election campaign of 1993 is safe homes and safe streets. Everything we have done in the justice agenda and through the Solicitor General since we have been in this Parliament has been to achieve safer communities in this country.

If the hon. member and the members of that party are truly concerned about the safety of Canadians and their communities, he will work with us on the proposals we are bringing forward to deal with high risk offenders and to strengthen the criminal justice system of this country.

Capital Punishment
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, I would be more than pleased to vote on the gun legislation; it would be no. I would be pleased to vote on the capital punishment referendum; it would be yes, if he wants to know how I feel. Seventy-eight convicted murderers on conditional release murdered again.

This minister in Bill C-41 for hate crimes believes that getting tough on crime is the answer.

Since the minister agrees harsher sentences prevent crime, will he not prevent future murders by enacting the return of capital punishment for first degree murder?

Capital Punishment
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, on this side of the House we believe that the way to work toward increased public safety is through proposals that have substance and that rely on real analysis and get results.

We do not believe that the answer is simply to rely on bluff and bluster or mean-spirited personal attacks or to exploit tragedies.

We are interested in real public safety. I invite the hon. member to work with us on the proposals the solicitor general and I are bringing forward to deal with high risk offenders and strengthen the criminal justice system instead of going to what looks like the simple answers to exploit the public mood.

Climate Change
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Liberal

Charles Caccia Davenport, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday an editorial in the Globe suggested that there are benefits to be reaped from recent trends in climate change.

This conclusion is contradicted in a draft report by the United Nations panel on climate change and a recent Environment Canada report citing increasing summer temperatures.

My question is for the Minister of the Environment. Does the minister agree with this editorial? If not, what does she and the government plan to counter the human causes of climate change?

Climate Change
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, last summer we saw very directly the potential devastating cost of climate change in the forest fires that burned from east to west an area of commercial forests equal to the size of the province of New Brunswick. We had the second worst forest fire period on record.

The commercial loss in forestry alone last year was $3 billion. The direct cost of the fires and storms caused by global warming was $500 million. Contrary to the claims of the Globe and Mail , a longer growing season for farmers will lead to less productivity because the level of moisture is going to remain the same, putting us in a position of facing further droughts.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Question Period

September 21st, 1995 / 3 p.m.

NDP

Vic Althouse Mackenzie, SK

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.

The northern hemisphere's grain harvest is near completion, indicating little change in global supplies that should dampen the current, strong rising price trend. Because of the rising prices, can the minister tell the House why the government persists in maintaining wheat board initial prices for wheat and barley that are about one dollar a bushel below the open market domestic price? Is he trying to undermine the wheat board system?

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Regina—Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, I am sure the hon. member will recognize his last sentence as a gratuitous remark that is rather out of place.

Like the hon. member, I too hope that initial payment levels in Canada can be increased progressively throughout the current crop year and from my point of view the sooner the better.

There are two factors that need to be borne in mind. First, even though the North American harvest may be virtually complete, the western Canadian harvest is now only about 60 per cent complete. There are still questions to be answered about final quantity and quality. It would obviously be premature on the basis of the amount that is completed so far to move at this point with respect to initial payments.

However, I fully expect the Canadian Wheat Board to make its most favourable recommendations to me at the earliest possible date.

The other factor the hon. gentleman should bear in mind is a warning against any hasty increase in initial payments that could provide the Americans with additional grist for their mill in their ongoing, unwarranted attacks against the Canadian Wheat Board.

Presence In Gallery
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

The Speaker

I would like to draw members' attention to the presence in the gallery of the Hon. Nicholas Soames. Besides being the minister of state for the armed forces of Great Britain, perhaps my colleague, whom I met with earlier today, will permit me to say also that in this very Chamber his grandfather, the Right Honourable Sir Winston Churchill, addressed a joint session of this House in 1941.

I present to you the Hon. Nicholas Soames.

Presence In Gallery
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.