House of Commons Hansard #114 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was health.

Topics

Invisible Ribbon Campaign
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Ronald J. Duhamel St. Boniface, MB

Mr. Speaker, I received a letter recently from two Manitobans who are concerned that Canadians no longer value the military. Like myself, they think that this must not be allowed to continue. As a result of this they have begun the invisible ribbon campaign.

The ribbons, one of which members see me wear, are made out of plastic wrap. This is symbolic of the invisible uniform warn by the partners, spouses and children of military personnel. They are as committed to the military way of life as the personnel who wear the uniform. So too their morale is affected by negative media attention and public opinion.

I urge all members to join me in wearing an invisible ribbon to demonstrate that Canadians do appreciate military personnel and their families.

This campaign will help reaffirm pride in the military and let military personnel and their families know that Canadians recognize and support their vital contribution to Canada.

Please join with me in urging people across Canada to wear the invisible ribbon. Let's have a visual thumbs up for the military.

Please join me in wearing this ribbon.

Softwood Lumber
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

Philip Mayfield Cariboo—Chilcotin, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals promised Canadians jobs, jobs, jobs, but what Canadians have received are pink slips, pink slips, pink slips.

Nowhere has this been made more clear than in the chaos created by the Liberal government when it signed the softwood lumber agreement with the United States. This agreement is killing jobs and destroying job security across Canada.

The softwood lumber agreement is problematic for another reason. It replaces an open lumber market with the problems of a marketing board. Already I am hearing stories of lumber quotas being for sale to the highest bidder, while mills are being shut down and employees are being laid off because of a lack of lumber quota.

Will this Liberal government stop micro-managing the lumber industry and do something for the people of one of Canada's largest industries? I challenge the Liberal government to defend the jobs of Canadians against U.S. interests by referring the softwood lumber issue to the World Trade Organization.

People are hurting-

Softwood Lumber
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for The Battlefords-Meadow Lake.

Canadian Airlines
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

NDP

Len Taylor The Battlefords—Meadow Lake, SK

Mr. Speaker, we are offended by yesterday's decision by the Minister of Labour to force a vote of CAW members at Canadian Airlines. This is an unprecedented and shocking attack on workers' rights.

At the same time we recognize the minister's attempts to use the Canada Labour Code to protect the bungling of the Minister of Transport, who seems not to understand the real crisis facing Canadian Airlines or has chosen to ignore it.

New Democrats recognize that the real issue is the stability of the industry which it has demonstrated cannot regulate itself.

We care about the jobs of Canadian Airlines. We care about the future of the industry. However, we are concerned that by focusing only on the concessions being demanded of working people that the job and industrial security we all desire will be lost in the long term.

If the federal government wants to be involved in Canadian Airlines restructuring, it should leave collective bargaining to the affected parties and go to the table with a real package that addresses the real problems of the industry.

[Translation]

International Trade
Statements By Members

December 5th, 1996 / 2 p.m.

Bloc

Jean Landry Lotbinière, QC

Mr. Speaker, last week, a NAFTA panel ruled that the Canada's supply system for dairy products, eggs and poultry did not violate the rules of that treaty, nor those of the World Trade Organization. This decision is an important victory for Canada over American claims.

However, we should have no illusion about the spirit that drives our neighbours to the south. Just last week, U.S. farmers asked their government to amend NAFTA if the panel did not rule in their favour.

It is very likely that this lobby will continue to put pressure on the American administration to get the changes it wants. Consequently, the Minister for International Trade must remain firm on this issue.

The Bloc Quebecois remembers very well the mess created by this minister regarding the softwood lumber issue. We hope that, this time, the minister will show determination and will protect our fellow citizens.

Earthquake
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Sarkis Assadourian Don Valley North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to recognize the eighth anniversary of the tragic Armenian earthquake on December 7, 1988. On that day over 25,000 lives were lost and hundreds of thousands of people were left homeless and injured.

The Armenian people will always remember the response of the Canadian government to this horrible tragedy. Over $6 million in aid was provided by the government to the people of Armenia and an additional $2.5 million in humanitarian relief was raised by Canadians.

On Sunday I will join Canadians of Armenian origin and Armenians everywhere in church services to mourn the loss of family members and friends. I urge my fellow members to reflect on this horrible tragedy and join with me in this commemoration.

Communications
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

George Proud Hillsborough, PE

Mr. Speaker, if you ask Canadians what they associate with Prince Edward Island, many will say Anne of Green Gables. Some might say amazing golf courses and others will say that it is a small, wonderful place to visit.

If I were to be asked the same question I might say call centres. Yes, that is right, I said call centres. We have a highly advanced telephone network.

Listing a few companies that have already set up shop on the island are Cows, Island Tel, the GST Centre, HookUp Communications and Watts Communications.

In fact we foresee such a growth in the industry that Holland College has set up a call centre and customer service excellence program to train call centre workers. The program will be the benchmark for high level training standards in the industry.

The call centre industry will provide year round full time jobs for Islanders. It is an excellent niche that has great potential for employment opportunities. Islanders are taking full advantage of their strength in carving out specialty niches, and eventually they will break the seasonality of the island economy.

Air Guns
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Hickey St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, a 1995 Environics poll estimated that one in seven households in Canada own air guns that shoot BBs or pellets or both. These weapons can penetrate flesh and thin bone at just 348 feet per second.

More than 25 people have been killed by air guns in North America since 1980. Canadian hospitals report a growing number of non-fatal accidents involving such weapons. For example, Amanda Noseworthy of St. John's lost an eye when shot by a young boy who was playing with his rifle in a friend's home. Amanda is now losing the vision in her good eye and may become totally blind.

I have spoken to the federal justice minister on behalf of Amanda and her family and told him I support the inclusion of air guns as a real firearm under the Criminal Code of Canada, and therefore, should be subject to the same controls and safeguards.

Air guns are not toys. They are dangerous weapons that can kill. They must be regulated for the protection and safety of our children.

Réseau De L'Information
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, last week, the heritage minister was wondering why RDI did not cover an event in which she participated, and which was sponsored by the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada.

The Deputy Prime Minister suggested that RDI did not provide adequate coverage of issues concerning francophones outside Quebec. However, the fact is that RDI gives them long periods of coverage every day. Could it be that the heritage minister does not watch RDI?

The problem with RDI is not that it does not talk about francophones outside Quebec. The problem is that hundreds of French speaking households in English Canada do not get that channel, because the government agreed to make it an optional service for cable operators.

The question is: Does this government truly care about francophones outside Quebec, considering it did not deem appropriate to give them real access to RDI?

Householder Survey
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Ed Harper Simcoe Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, my fall householder survey is generating hundreds of responses, with 787 so far. I will share the results with the House.

The first question dealt with the Liberal plan for harmonizing the GST with provincial sales taxes. When asked if they would support this in Ontario, 64 per cent said no while only 24 per cent said yes.

When asked if tobacco products should be placed under the Hazardous Products Act to give the government increased power over advertising and chemical contents, 72 per cent of Simcoe Centre voters said yes while 21 per cent said no. When asked if the federal government is justified in spending $20 million a year on the Canada Information Office, a whopping 90 per cent said no and only 8 per cent said yes.

The message is clear. The government needs to deal seriously with the tobacco issue, forget about a GST harmonization tax grab and stop wasting money on propaganda. When are the Liberals going to get the message? They just don't get it.

Communications
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Charles Hubbard Miramichi, NB

Mr. Speaker, the province of New Brunswick and my riding of Miramichi take great pride in our leading role in the field of computer technology and communications.

The premier of New Brunswick, Frank McKenna, together with the New Brunswick Telephone Company and Fundy Cable have co-ordinated their efforts to provide services and opportunities for the people of our province. The New Brunswick Community College, Miramichi, has received national recognition for its leadership in developing programs in multimedia technology, imaging, animation and virtual reality.

There is no secret to New Brunswick's success in attracting leading edge companies and call centres. NB Tel has digital equipment and some of the best fibre optics communications systems in the world. Our province has the economic environment to pursue and attract industries in the 21st century. I would like to inform the House that New Brunswick and the Miramichi are opened for business.

Gun Control
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Warren Allmand Notre-Dame-De-Grâce, QC

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow is the national day of remembrance and action on violence against women. It is also the seventh anniversary of the massacre of 14 women at the École Polytechnique in Montreal. On that occasion, Marc Lepine, a deranged young man without a criminal record, not a professional criminal, was able to obtain a semi-automatic rifle and kill these innocent women. He was able to do this because there were gaps, weaknesses in our gun laws.

Parliament has now closed these gaps and tightened the law, but the provinces of Alberta, Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan are contesting this law in court, supported by the Conservative and Reform parties.

This law may not be perfect, but whenever access to guns is limited, the rate of crime with guns is reduced. The charge that guns do not kill, people kill, is ludicrous. It is much easier and effective to kill with a gun.

With more restrictions on guns there would be fewer homicides. Canadians should send a message to their provincial governments on this issue.

Violence Against Women
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Bramalea—Gore—Malton, ON

Mr. Speaker, on December 6, 1989, 14 young women were killed in Montreal. Today I wish to reflect on the struggles of all women affected by violence.

December 6 is Canada's national day of remembrance and action on violence against women. Violence against women has serious economic, health and social costs attached to it for individuals, families and society.

The Government of Canada is committed to working to eliminate violence against women. Everyone in society must become more involved, be it in their homes or communities in the fight against women's inequality. Violence against women is clearly a direct result of women's inequality in society.

Status Of Women
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Sharon Hayes Port Moody—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday two members from the other side attempted to justify the government's status of women portfolio.

The member for Halifax mentioned the department's commitment to women's health. But at the recent Canada-U.S. health forum, Canadian breast cancer advocates found themselves unaware of the conference's objectives and were shocked to discover their American counterparts had not even been invited.

The member for Halifax also spoke of the role status of women played at the UN Conference on Women in Beijing. What she did not mention was Canada's support for the marginalization of many Canadian women in order to advance its narrow agenda.

The official Canadian facilitating committee report classified the Vatican, pro-life groups and REAL Woman as fundamentalist groups and went on to say that: "Constant criticism of fundamentalist discourses is a collective responsibility because they endanger the rights of women all over the world".

I would like to know if the Secretary of State for the Status of Women, while standing on Canadian soil in front of Canadian citizens, including her own constituents, will defend this statement.

Natashquan
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard St-Laurent Manicouagan, QC

Mr. Speaker, next Saturday, December 7, an extraordinary event will take place in my constituency, when the highway between Havre-Saint-Pierre and Natashquan will be officially opened. After several years of hard work by the offices of both politicians and local administrators, the communities of Baie-Johan-Beetz, Aquanish, Pointe-Parent and Natashquan will finally be linked to the rest of the North American road system.

The poet, songwriter and singer Gilles Vigneault, who made this small area of our country famous, will honour us with his presence.

Natashquan is now a tourist destination accessible to everyone. With its breathtaking scenery and the warm hospitality of its residents, the region is now ready to share its beauty and its treasures with the rest of the world.

Everyone is welcome.