House of Commons Hansard #3 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was quebec.

Topics

Order In Council Appointments
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), I wish to table, in both official languages, copies of Order in Council appointments made by the government.

I also have the honour to table, in both official languages, a nomination made recently by the government.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Fundy Royal
New Brunswick

Liberal

Paul Zed Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to 10 petitions presented during the first session.

Report Of Chief Electoral Officer Of Canada
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Dear colleagues, I have the honour of tabling an annex to the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada's report on the 35th general election, entitled "Canada's Electoral System: Strengthening the Foundation".

This document is deemed permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Interparliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Pierrefonds—Dollard
Québec

Liberal

Bernard Patry Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34, I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, the report of the Canadian chapter of the International Assembly of French-Speaking Parliamentarians, as well as the financial report of the meeting of the IAFSP office held in Hanoi, Vietnam on February 4 and 5, 1996.

Judges Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-2, an act to amend the Judges Act.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Reform

Dick Harris Prince George—Bulkley Valley, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-201, an act to amend the Criminal Code (operation while impaired).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise in the House today to introduce this private member's bill which would see the Criminal Code amended to provide for a minimum sentence of seven years for convictions of impaired driving causing death.

At present the Criminal Code provides a 14-year maximum sentence for this conviction. However, statistics show that sentences range in the average of only one to four years for this serious crime. In a recent case in my riding involving the death of three family members, the convicted person, who had two prior impaired charges and convictions, received only a three and a half year sentence, hardly consistent with the tragic consequences of this crime.

The amendment I propose will ensure that sentencing reflects the severity of the crime and sends out a strong message of deterrence.

I am pleased to advise the House that this measure has received the support of many of my fellow MPs-

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

I would ask all members please to be brief when they are making their introduction of bills. I know we could all speak for a long time about our bills.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

National Organ Donor Day Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Dan McTeague Ontario, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-202, an act respecting a national organ donor day in Canada.

Mr. Speaker, I am reintroducing this private member's bill which was previously introduced in the House on October 19, 1995.

The bill recognizes the efforts of a constituent of mine, Mrs. Linda Rumble of Whitby, Ontario and the ultimate gift her nephew, two-year-old Stuart Alan Herriott, gave to others whom he never knew.

This bill assists in providing more public education and awareness in organ donation by making every April 21 known as national organ donor day across Canada. April 21 marks the anniversary of young Stuart's death.

By establishing a national organ donor day it is hoped that more Canadians will be encouraged to make a pledge to organ donation. In doing so, Stuart's supreme gift will be remembered so that his act of kindness can be repeated by many other Canadians.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Bloc

Réal Ménard Hochelaga—Maisonneuve, QC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-202, an act to amend the Criminal Code (criminal organization).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to table a bill to amend the Criminal Code, which will essentially provide Canada with anti-gang legislation. The main purpose of this bill is to set a new policy condemning those who live off the proceeds of crime.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Canada Business Corporations Act
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-203, an act to amend the Canada Business Corporations Act (qualifications of directors).

Mr. Speaker, I would like to reintroduce this bill concerning an amendment to the Canada Business Corporations Act, specifically to do with limiting the number of concurrent corporate directorships that anyone can hold where that person holds less than 5 per cent of the voting shares of the corporation.

The nature of the bill has to do with the importance of directors' liability and that there is a point at which one person could hold more directorships than they could discharge their responsibilities fully.

Therefore, this bill seeks to limit the number of directorships so that the interests of shareholders, the employees and the corporation can be safeguarded.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Liberal

Tom Wappel Scarborough West, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-205, an act to amend the Criminal Code and the Copyright Act (profit from authorship respecting a crime).

Mr. Speaker, my reintroduced bill would amend the Criminal Code and the Copyright Act to prohibit a criminal from profiting by selling, authorizing or authoring the story of a crime. If a person is convicted of an indictable offence under the Criminal Code, any moneys he or she may have made or may make in the future from the creation of a work based on the crime would be deemed proceeds of crime subject to seizure by the crown.

The bill further amends the Copyright Act to provide that the copyright in any work principally based on the crime, where the work is created, prepared or published by or in collaboration with the convicted person, becomes the property of the crown. This would permit Canada, in countries which have signed the Berne Copyright Convention, to enforce its copyright.

The bottom line is that no one should receive a dime for committing a crime.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Liberal

Tom Wappel Scarborough West, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-206, an act to amend the Criminal Code (offence committed outside Canada).

Mr. Speaker, section 6.2 of the Criminal Code specifies that persons are not to be convicted of offences committed outside Canada. However, there are a few exceptions such as war crimes, hostage taking, hijacking, international terrorism, et cetera.

My bill amends section 7 of the Criminal Code and provides that everyone who commits an act or omission outside Canada that, if committed in Canada, would constitute an offence under the Criminal Code, shall be deemed to have committed the act in Canada, if he or she is a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident, or present in Canada after the commission of the act.

The tragic inspiration for this bill is the true case of two Canadians who sexually assaulted a Canadian child while on holiday in the Caribbean. At present, there is no way of prosecuting those criminals in Canada. My bill would close this loophole and allow us to bring people like them to justice.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Liberal

Tom Wappel Scarborough West, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-207, an act to amend the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act (recommendations of the Review Committee).

Mr. Speaker, this is a very specific bill that I am reintroducing to amend a particular section, section 52 of the Canadian Intelligence Service Act.

It would provide that recommendations of the Security Intelligence Review Committee are to be implemented unless overruled by the minister concerned. In that event the minister would be required to report to Parliament the reasons for overruling the decision of the committee. If the reasons were secret the minister would be required to report to Parliament why they were deemed to be secret.

The principle of this bill has been recommended to successive governments by the Security Intelligence Review Committee.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

10:15 a.m.

Liberal

Tom Wappel Scarborough West, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-208, an act to amend the Criminal Code (human being).

Mr. Speaker, the purpose of this bill is to add a definition of the term human being to the Criminal Code. The purpose of the definition is to extend the same protection to the unborn child as we extend currently to the born child and to focus the debate on the vexing issue of abortion and the question that has heretofore not been addressed, whether society wishes to extend protection to the unborn child.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Consumer Packaging And Labelling Act
Routine Proceedings

February 29th, 1996 / 10:15 a.m.

Liberal

Tom Wappel Scarborough West, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-209, an act to amend the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act (nutritional value of food).

Mr. Speaker, the purpose this bill which is being reintroduced is to amend the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act to provide that foods sold to consumers across Canada have certain nutritional information stated on the label, including the vitamin content, carbohydrate content, fat content and the caloric amount per portion. This information is very common in the United States but is voluntary in Canada. This bill would make it mandatory.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)