House of Commons Hansard #76 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was federal.

Topics

The 150Th Anniversary Of The Séminaire De Joliette
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Bloc

René Laurin Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, on Sunday, September 29, Joliette's oldest educational institution will celebrate its 150th anniversary.

In 1846, Barthélemy Joliette, the founder of the city, established the Collège Joliette, which later became the Séminaire de Joliette, then the Académie Antoine-Manseau, and now the Cégep Joliette-de-Lanaudière. Headed by the Clercs de Saint-Viateur, with the support of secular priests and lay persons, this institution has always offered top quality education and training, and boasts among its former students the current Prime Minister of Canada and member for Shawinigan, and the deputy premier of Quebec, Jean-Bernard Landry.

Today, I have the great privilege of paying tribute to my former alma mater. The dedication, perseverance and generosity of its builders contributed significantly to the enrichment of our country and to the development of Quebecers.

Prime Ministerial Appointments
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Reform

Jim Abbott Kootenay East, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has done it yet again with the appointment of Wilfred Moore to the Senate yesterday. He has extended his unbroken streak of blatantly and cynically putting his Liberal Party interests ahead of democracy in Canada.

I do not need to talk about Mr. Moore's impeccable Liberal pedigree because the Prime Minister wants only people who would do his bidding.

Canadians should realize how the Prime Minister is perverting the Canadian democratic process. For example, Canadians assume because their elected representatives overcame strong lobbying by the heritage minister and her department that there be a ban on cable company negative option billing that the ban would come into effect but this is not so. Even as we speak the Liberal senators are being told how to vote on behalf of the heritage department, on behalf of the cable companies and against consumers. This Prime Minister wants to have his own way.

Perverting the Canadian democratic process with endless Senate appointments works against Canadians who are demanding accountability instead of Liberal manipulation.

Drayton Festival
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

John Richardson Perth—Wellington—Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to the Drayton Festival. Located in my riding, the Drayton Festival will conclude its sixth season on Sunday, October 6.

A true success story, the festival has quickly grown from 16,000 tickets sold in 1991 to 60,000 this year. Running from May to October, the 21-week season is the third longest running summer theatre in Ontario.

This season the most popular show was a Canadian musical play about the second world war as seen through the eyes of six Canadian soldiers. Extremely popular with all audiences and heavily supported by the Royal Canadian Legion, the show was 98 per cent sold out.

The theatre, which receives no government money, recently launched a $1.5 million capital campaign to renovate its historic building. To date over $500,000 has been raised.

As you can see, Mr. Speaker, the success of the theatre is phenomenal, especially when you consider it is located in a village with a population of 1,300.

Arthritis Month
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Beryl Gaffney Nepean, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the House that September has been designated Arthritis Month by the Arthritis Society.

Arthritis is a significant health issue that has disabled 600,000 Canadians and has become the most common cause of long term disability in Canada. It costs our economy more than $5 billion annually.

There is still no cure. Arthritis research is a critical component of the strategy to address this disorder.

During Arthritis Month this year, a new Internet site is being launched by the Arthritis Society in conjunction with the society's corporate partner and the Canadian Rheumatology Association.

The web site is being developed, maintained and supported on a voluntary basis by a dynamic team of Canadian rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons, physical and occupational therapists and family physicians.

I congratulate the Arthritis Society and its 100,000 dedicated volunteers whose efforts continue to bring hope to many Canadians suffering from arthritis.

Vaughan Interact Club
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Maurizio Bevilacqua York North, ON

Mr. Speaker, this summer I was invited to speak at the founding of the Vaughan

Interact Club. At a time in our country's history when youth unemployment is a challenge, organizations such as the Interact Club are essential.

Sponsored by our local Rotary Club and the Vaughan Chamber of Commerce, Interact gives area youths the opportunity to learn valuable leadership and teamwork skills while gaining experience that will serve them well down the road. By focusing on community service and understanding, Interact prepares our youth for the challenges they face entering the world of work.

To the youths who have taken the initiative to join Interact and the business leaders who will volunteer their time, I say to them, congratulations. They have made a wise decision and one which will benefit themselves and the community in which they live.

This type of effective partnership between youth, community associations and area businesses is exactly the kind of alliance that is needed to help our youth take on their future and realize their full potential.

Anne Hébert
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Gaston Leroux Richmond—Wolfe, QC

Mr. Speaker, on August 29, novelist and poet Anne Hébert gave to the University of Sherbrooke several manuscripts and audio material representing the greater part of her literary work in Quebec before 1960.

These documents are an invaluable part of our heritage. When the agreement was signed between Ms Hébert and the University of Sherbrooke, university Rector Pierre Reid said to the author: "Ms Hébert, the gift you are making today to the University of Sherbrooke will form the basis of research for generations of students."

In order to promote research, the University of Sherbrooke pledged to create a centre, scheduled to open in May of 1997. Michel Gosselin, a professor of literature at the Collège de Sherbrooke, a writer and a friend of the author, will chair the steering committee of this research centre.

My colleagues and I wish to extend our warm appreciation to Ms Hébert for this gift to the Province of Quebec, and particularly to the Eastern Townships.

Young Offenders Act
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Bob Ringma Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, years of half measures dealing with youth crime have left Canadians with laws that allow criminals to go unpunished because they are between the ages of 12 and 17.

Victims rights groups and Canadians in general have been shut out of the process to reform the Young Offenders Act. However, in my riding of Nanaimo-Cowichan, constituents are being heard on this issue.

Using the direct democracy initiative of televoting, residents are voting on the following questions:

  1. Do you feel that youths charged with violent crimes should automatically be dealt with in adult court?

  2. Should the names of youths convicted of a serious crime be released to the public?

  3. Should the Young Offenders Act be amended to lower the age at which a youth can be charged from 12 years to 10?

To date, 698 people have responded and in time their views will be reflected in legislation which I will bring before this House.

Agriculture
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

NDP

Vic Althouse Mackenzie, SK

Mr. Speaker, although the Liberals promised to keep marketing boards, the Crow benefit and branch lines, they have already gotten rid of two of those three pillars of their policy. When confronted with their duplicity they say that the international agreements made them do it. However, during the election they said they would not sign those agreements.

Now the Liberal government has offered up marketing boards on the sacrificial altar of free trade for the 1999 round. Canadian officials did not have to call them state trading entities but they did. The government did not have to sign onto the agenda but it did.

Unfortunately for Canadian farmers who want to keep single desk selling, our officials have willingly taken the poison to kill the boards and now we find there is no antidote. What is worse, no one inside the government seems to be looking for one.

Impaired Driving
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Paul Devillers Simcoe North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw the House's attention to the problem of impaired driving, a serious social problem which unfortunately still manifests itself in our society with all the negative consequences it entails.

Many have proposed solutions to this serious problem, without giving proper thought to their degree of success. Impaired driving is a complex issue that cannot be resolved by adopting ill-considered half-measures.

The problem of impaired driving requires comprehensive, not piecemeal solutions. Dealing with impaired drivers requires efforts in the social as well as the legislative arenas. Only then will we succeed in our goal to eradicate this criminal and socially unacceptable behaviour.

Canadian Unity
Statements By Members

September 27th, 1996 / 11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Eugène Bellemare Carleton—Gloucester, ON

Mr. Speaker, I wish to commend a constituent of mine from Greely in Osgoode township who has found a novel way to promote Canadian unity.

Mr. Kent Hamilton has created a train whistle out of Canadian pine and cedar which provides a sound reminiscent of early steam engines that brought our country together from the Atlantic to the Pacific in 1885.

Mr. Hamilton calls his instrument in both official languages: l'Unisifflet and The Great Canadian Whistle. I am proud to join him, and many others, to show our national pride by blowing in the Great Canadian Whistle.

Health Care
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Judy Bethel Edmonton East, AB

Mr. Speaker, the premier of Alberta visited financiers on Wall Street in New York City this week extolling the virtues of the Alberta advantage. However people on the main streets in Edmonton East know the premier is ignoring one essential element of the Alberta advantage, one that is of paramount importance to Albertans: quality health care services and an accessible health care system.

The premier believes that responsible health care restructuring simply means taking dollars out of the system without any consideration for the impact on people, on services or on budgets.

The results of cutting too deep too fast with no planning were illustrated this week when Alberta's regional health authorities reported a combined deficit of $100.6 million for the 1995-96 fiscal year.

Albertans clearly see health care in that province as an Alberta disadvantage. Their confidence rests with our Prime Minister who understands their overwhelming desire for an effective, efficient health care system and who is committed to upholding the principles of the Canada Health Act.

The Minister Of National Defence
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Jean H. Leroux Shefford, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like the Minister of National Defence to explain to this House what he means when he says that the generals in the Canadian Armed Forces carry no more weight than a plumber.

To my knowledge, when something is wrong with the plumbing, you call a good plumber. And when a government has problems with its armed forces, it makes just as much sense for it to attach a minimum of importance to the opinions of its generals.

When the defence minister says that his generals carry no more weight than a plumber in the decisions concerning the armed forces, what use then are these generals?

In my opinion, the minister is no longer seeing straight in this affair. His lack of judgment and inappropriate remarks point to one thing: he is no longer able to hold such a position.

The Prime Minister has no choice but to call for the resignation of the defence minister.

The Late Bert Hargrave
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Reform

Monte Solberg Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to inform the House of the passing of a former member of Parliament from Medicine Hat constituency, Mr. Bert Hargrave.

Mr. Hargrave devoted his lifetime to the promotion of agriculture and public service, and often the twain did meet.

A graduate of the University of Saskatchewan, he served as a tank engineer in World War II. A strong supporter of agriculture, he took over the family farm at Walsh, Alberta in 1945. In 1972 he took office as a Conservative member until retiring in 1984, serving for a time as Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture. His tireless devotion to his life work was recognized when he was inducted into the Alberta Agriculture Hall of Fame.

Over the years I met him on several occasions. I was honoured when in his later years he became a member and supporter of my party.

Mr. Hargrave was a typical western gentleman: tough, straightforward and generous. He passed away Tuesday at age 79 and will be laid to rest on Monday beside his wife Amy.

I know the House will join me in extending sympathies to his family. He will be sorely missed. May he rest in peace.

Reference To The Supreme Court
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Bloc Quebecois showed us once again that its talents lie more in the politics of showmanship than in dialogue. The reference of the question of a unilateral declaration of independence to the Supreme Court surely does not merit such a frenzied spectacle from the Bloc Quebecois.

The sole purpose of our government's decision is to demystify the concept put forward by the separatists that Quebec has the right to unilaterally declare its independence.

We are in no way denying the right of the government of Quebec to organize a consultative referendum on the future of Quebec. We merely wish to avoid having any future unilateral declaration of independence by the government of Quebec take place in confusion and chaos.

We believe that the interest of the people of Quebec must come before the separatists' partisan interests. We urge the Bloc Quebecois to co-operate in this important process of clarification.

Reference To The Supreme Court
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Nick Discepola Vaudreuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government of Quebec will not comment on the reference to the Supreme Court by the Minister of Justice.

Yet, last May 29, in connection with the Bertrand case, Lucien Bouchard took quite a different position from that just adopted by his government, and I quote: "I obviously cannot just allow the court to go ahead without saying anything. The lawyers are attacking Quebec's rights".

As for the leader of the Bloc Quebecois, he said on June 5, and I am again quoting: "I have always told Mr. Bouchard, and I told him again recently, that the policy of the empty chair is not appropriate at this time".

Quebecers are entitled to know the separatists' arguments concerning the unilateral declaration of independence. To refuse to take part in the deliberations of the Supreme Court is to deny them this right.