House of Commons Hansard #25 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was decision.

Topics

Trade
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

York West
Ontario

Liberal

Sergio Marchi Minister for International Trade

Mr. Speaker, the member says that the Government of Canada's position is that it is unwilling to commit to the very issues that he is talking about. That is the wrong assumption.

I said to the member there is no Canadian and no political party in this House that wants a lower degradation for our environment or lower standards of workers rights.

The question on the matter is that this is a negotiation with 29 countries. Canada is pushing for the highest standards. It is a situation that is evolving and we have to rally a consensus. That is exactly what we will do, despite how high he jumps or how low—

Trade
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. McClelland)

The hon. member for Sherbrooke.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Jean Charest Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question to the government is on the Pacific salmon dispute between Canada and the United States.

The government will know that the principle of equity in this treaty is a key principle, as is the principle of conservation. I would like to know from the government whether or not it will ask envoys Ruckelshaus and Strangway to make recommendations to governments on ways where they could include a dispute settlement mechanism and also propose options for a binding mechanism as a way of ending the impasse on the equity principle?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Winnipeg South Centre
Manitoba

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, under the terms of reference that we negotiated with the Americans to establish the special envoy process, they can recommend anything they want. If they, on the basis of their consultations, are able to find the support for a variety of measures, including dispute resolution, of course the governments of both Canada and the United States would want to respond.

The mandate of the envoys is totally open to include anything the hon. member wants to suggest to them.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Jean Charest Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, with all respect, the minister's answer is a good indication of what is wrong with the government's position on this. It does not seem to want to give any political direction. In fact, yesterday it met with the envoys and we learned nothing as a result of that meeting. Nothing new is on the table.

I would like to know when this government is going to show some backbone for the families on the west coast of British Columbia suffering in this dispute. Will it, yes or no, ask the envoys for an interim report when they will meet the prime minister and President Clinton around the APEC meetings? When will the government show some backbone on behalf of British Columbians and not be like Reformers and not care?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Winnipeg South Centre
Manitoba

Liberal

Lloyd Axworthy Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the high state of agitation of the hon. member simply shows a total misunderstanding of how to get a solution.

What we are working on is to be based on the agreement of those directly affected. He has waved his arms about the need to respond to the fishing communities on the west coast. That is what we are doing. We are giving them the empowerment to help make those solutions to come to those issues. We are working on the grassroots, bottom up thing, not the top down elitist approach the hon. leader of the Conservative Party wants.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

October 31st, 1997 / 11:30 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, earlier this week the defence minister, in referring to a lack of disclosure about a missile incident, said the following: “If there was any injury to person or property then of course it would be made public”. On September 7, 1995 Canadian Vandoos in Croatia set fire to their own mess in an apparent attempt to cover up a theft of some video equipment. Property was stolen and damaged. Why was the public never informed?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, 1995 is long before I became minister of defence. I do not know about back then but nowadays we do provide maximum amount of information to the public. There are obviously a lot of incidents that occur in a military the size of ours that are of no public interest.

However, where there is any damage to person or property information is in fact provided.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Reform

Art Hanger Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, the information and investigation in this particular incident have been ongoing. There appears to be no total conclusion to it. I think this minister, along with his predecessor, should be very much aware of what has happened.

I have in my possession documents received through access to information. They outline a series of events between September 7 and September 9 which indicates stolen property and certainly reflects an aspect of arson taking place there.

I remind the minister again, property was stolen and damaged. Why were no criminal charges laid? According to the minister—

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. McClelland)

The hon. Minister of National Defence.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, they are really scraping the bottom of the barrel here. They are going back several years. If the hon. member wants to provide the information I will be happy to have it looked into and we will get him an answer.

Closing Of Bc Mine
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Odina Desrochers Lotbinière, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Human Resources Development.

Today is the last day of work at the BC mine in Thetford Mines. Tomorrow morning, 300 workers will be without jobs. One worker put it this way: “This evening, I'll be getting out my old clothes. I don't even get severance pay or government assistance”.

Can the minister give us an update on the situation since his meeting with the workers last Wednesday?

Closing Of Bc Mine
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, we are obviously very concerned about the situation of these workers who, some of them after many, many years with the mine, are losing their jobs now that it is closing.

This is why my department met, at the end of September, with both the employer and worker representatives, and quickly and efficiently set up $2.5 to $3 million in active measures to help them re-enter the job market.

I met with representatives of the workers last Wednesday and they told me that the application under the POWA program being requested by the Bloc Quebecois was not what they wanted.

Closing Of Bc Mine
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Odina Desrochers Lotbinière, QC

Mr. Speaker, are we to understand that the minister is abandoning these workers to their fate, condemning them to poverty when their employment insurance benefits run out?

Closing Of Bc Mine
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, we have set up a certain number of active measures to help them re-enter the job market and there is a transitional job creation fund to help revitalize the job market.

We are going to do everything we can to allow these workers to really give it their best, because we do not think we should underestimate individuals who are still able to make a significant contribution to the regional economy.