House of Commons Hansard #14 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was political.

Topics

Canadian Medical Association
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Bernard Patry Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, as a physician, I am pleased to mark the 130th anniversary of the Canadian Medical Association, or CMA.

The CMA was born on October 9, 1867, under the leadership of Dr. William Marsden, who was soon considered to be the father of this association. In those days, the CMA had 167 members. Today, it represents the vast majority of physicians at the federal level.

The CMA speaks on behalf of physicians and provides a full range of services through its member service centre and its various branches, including corporate affairs, research, professional affairs, marketing and commercial activities, professional development and public affairs.

Long live the great family of the Canadian Medical Association, its twelve independent provincial and territorial divisions and its 42 affiliates.

Canadian Medical Association
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, on October 9, 1867, three months after the proclamation of Canadian Confederation, 167 physicians from the then four provinces of Canada met in Quebec City to establish the Canadian Medical Association. The first president of the CMA was Sir Charles Tupper who would later in 1896 serve as Prime Minister of Canada.

Today the Canadian Medical Association celebrates its 130th anniversary, making it one of the oldest associations in Canada. The mission of the CMA is to provide leadership for physicians and to promote the highest standard of health and health care for Canadians.

It is an honour for me as a physician to commemorate this anniversary and I ask that you, Mr. Speaker, and my colleagues join me in extending our best wishes to the doctors of Canada.

Canadian Medical Association
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Radar Veterans Reunion
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

Peter Goldring Edmonton East, AB

Mr. Speaker, as a former airman in the Royal Canadian Air Force of the 1960s I am pleased to announce today we are honoured by the presence in the gallery of veterans who manned the Commonwealth radar installations in the second world war.

These men and women of the Royal Canadian Air Force operated and maintained these never sleeping, ever-vigilant eyes of freedom. The use of radar was pioneered by our visitors, developing into a technology that protected Canada through the cold war but, more importantly, by detecting the earliest stages of enemy air attacks. The radar network saved countless lives and helped ensure victory for the Allies.

I invite all members of the House to give recognition to Canada's honourable radar veterans of the Royal Canadian Air Force.

Radar Veterans Reunion
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Radar Veterans Reunion
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

John Richardson Perth—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise in the House today to echo the tribute to the Canadian men and women who were called by the British government to assist the Allies' air defence and they answered “Ready, aye, ready”. We have them here today as a testimonial. This may be their last reunion as time catches up. We love to have the opportunity to salute their efforts.

I would also like to pay special tribute to the role women played in this vital service to the RAF.

Thousands of Canadians responded and offered their services to meet the Royal Air Force's critical shortage of personnel in the radar systems on land and sea and in the air. These brave men and women were required to train for eight rigorous weeks and went on to serve honourably at radar stations in Europe, Asia, Africa, Arabia, India, China and other Far East countries.

Many military historians attribute the victory in this war to the Allies' superiority in radar air defence.

All this week the radar technicians have been in Ottawa for what may be their last reunion because many of their operators may be too old to keep it going.

Liberal Party Of Canada
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Ghislain Lebel Chambly, QC

Mr. Speaker, since last week, the Liberal government has been in hot water. Allegations of influence peddling have been pouring down on the Liberal Party of Canada and on certain individuals in key positions within the government.

Yet the Prime Minister and the President of the Treasury Board refuse to budge, hiding behind lame excuses.

Those who spend years teaching others to keep clean cannot take any risk when it comes to cleaning up their own house.

Yet the government's ethics counsellor works quietly, behind closed doors. Departmental employees are blithely breaking the government's code of ethics. There is still no legislation to make political party financing more transparent. The real policy of the government in this area is nothing but a sham.

Considering the way the government has been acting, it can no longer afford to give anybody lessons in public ethics.

Radar Veterans Reunion
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Catterall Ottawa West—Nepean, ON

Mr. Speaker, I too want to pay tribute to the nearly 6,000 Canadians who volunteered to serve during the second world war as radar technicians with the Royal Air Force.

They served around the world, but they also helped to defend Britain against invasion by air, warning of air raids and bombing attacks and thus helping the people of Britain through their darkest hour.

The efforts of these radar technicians were crucial in withstanding the assault of the Third Reich, the eventual victory for the Allies and the end of World War II.

The British government sent certificates of appreciation to these Canadian heroes, but instead of being distributed at the time they were destroyed. I am proud to have been instrumental last year in ensuring that a half century later, at their 50th reunion, these veterans finally got the certificates they deserved.

Today I am pleased to invite members of Parliament to meet and personally thank our radar technician veterans in Room 237-C immediately after question period.

The Senate
Statements By Members

October 9th, 1997 / 2:05 p.m.

Reform

Bill Gilmour Nanaimo—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, next week will mark the anniversary of the first Senate election in Canada. On October 16, 1989 Albertans elected the late Stan Waters to the Senate.

Albertans chose Stan Waters and the Prime Minister honoured their choice by appointing Stan to the upper chamber in 1990.

Stan Waters made Canadian history when he was elected by the biggest majority of Canadians in any election. He was chosen by the people to represent the people, not the interests of the political party in power.

Stan Waters set the example that the Prime Minister can follow, if he chooses to respect the principles of true democracy and honour the will of the people, because Senate election acts currently exist in both British Columbia and Alberta.

Canadians deserve more than government by patronage and appointment. Today an elected Senate is possible without constitutional change. Let us follow the—

Job Creation
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Jacques Saada Brossard—La Prairie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw the hon. members' attention to the actions taken by the Government of Canada to revive and develop the site of the military base and the airport area in Saint-Hubert and their surroundings.

The Federal Office of Regional Development for Quebec decided to contribute $990,000 to a local initiative for the creation of the Saint-Hubert military base and airport area corporation.

This corporation will be responsible for managing $1 million in adjustment money that the defence department made available to the area.

Moreover, $6 million will be invested over three years to transform the economic base of the area and promote technological development. The financial assistance will be used to help implement expansion plans for the small businesses in my area, Montreal's south shore.

This is a fine example of how good long-term jobs can be created in Quebec.

Health Care
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Michelle Dockrill Bras D'Or, NS

Mr. Speaker, I have good news and bad news for Canadians today.

The good news is, two-tier health care is not a threat any more. The bad news is, it is a reality.

Alberta's first private hospital is now up and running; a private for profit hospital where those who can afford to pay get service and those who cannot are left behind.

Allowing a private hospital to operate paves the way for two-tier health care. The government, egged on by the Reform Party, is standing aside to let it happen. This new private hospital is chomping at the bit to set up shop in Toronto, Edmonton and Vancouver.

Canadians want the Minister of Health to take action, not to sit idly by as foreign companies line up to rake in big profits while they dismantle medicare.

Surely patient care must always come before profit.

National Family Week
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Diane St-Jacques Shefford, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity to bring National Family Week to the attention of the House. Like many other Canadians, I am pressed for time by my work schedule and my other activities.

We should all relax a little. We should take time to play with our children and look after those we love, the members of our family.

We must not forget our family, whether it is a traditional family, a reconstituted family, an extended family or a single parent family. We must each remember our own family, and those governing us must do the same.

Unfortunately, the average Canadian family is growing poorer every day. I wish the government would remember whom it represents. Between National Family Week and National Child Day, November 20, I hope it will finally set its own targets for the reduction of poverty, for the good of our children and of their families.

Oktoberfest
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Lynn Myers Waterloo—Wellington, ON

Mr. Speaker, Oktoberfest in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario is an annual event which this year is from October 10 to 19.

This festival underscores the German heritage of our area in Ontario and in Canada. The Oktoberfest parade on October 13 is a nationally televised event which enables families everywhere to enjoy the spirit of “Gemutlichkeit” which means good cheer and good will which is so much part of this celebration.

I encourage all Canadians to join Kitchener-Waterloo in this great celebration.

Youth Employment
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gilles Bernier Tobique—Mactaquac, NB

Mr. Speaker, over the past several years youth in particular have been made to bear the brunt of the needlessly high level of unemployment imposed on this country by the Liberal government.

In my riding of Tobique—Mactaquac, more specifically school district 12, progress was being made. District 12 had implemented a school based youth internship program that was extremely successful, resulting in 60% of the participants having paid employment after the school year.

That is the good news. The bad news is that the Liberal government took one look at the results of the program and did what came naturally. It cut its funding.

I hope that some of the $90 million announced in the throne speech and earmarked for youth internship will find its way to Tobique—Mactaquac so that the school program can be reinstated.

Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ont.
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Gary Pillitteri Niagara Falls, ON

Mr. Speaker, Niagara-on-the-Lake, a town I have the honour of representing federally, may rank as the second prettiest town in the world. But in the hearts of those who live there and of the 3.5 million who visit our community each year, Niagara-on-the-Lake is and will always be the most beautiful town in the world.

At the Community in Bloom contest hosted in Madrid, Spain, Niagara-on-the-Lake was competing against four other finalists, one of which, Stratford, Ontario, came first.

Today I would like to salute Niagara-on-the-Lake and congratulate its citizens who made it possible for this beautiful Canadian town to participate in this important international competition and place second.

While I congratulate Stratford, I would like to point out that three of the four finalists were Canadian towns. This speaks volumes for Canada, the best country in the world in which to live.