House of Commons Hansard #149 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

Seasonal Workers
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Papineau—Saint-Michel
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, I have a hard time understanding how transportation could be easier from Mexico to Quebec farms than from one Quebec region to another. The logic in what the hon. member is saying eludes me.

Tobacco
Oral Question Period

March 21st, 1997 / 11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Parrish Mississauga West, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question today is for the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health.

The American tobacco company, Liggett Corporation, has publicly admitted that smoking is addictive, that it causes cancer and that the industry deliberately targets its marketing at young people between the ages of 14 and 18.

Can the parliamentary secretary tell Canadians the significance of this announcement and how it affects our efforts to curb tobacco consumption among young people?

Tobacco
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Liberal

Joe Volpe Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, it is important to understand that this confirms what the Government of Canada has been saying all along.

We presented a comprehensive strategy on combating tobacco use and its very serious and negative health impacts. It is a bad admission to make, but we are relieved that there is an indication, at least by the industry if not by the other parties, that we have been right all along. Tobacco is a cause of cancer and of heart disease and the companies have especially targeted young people.

Our bill, C-71, has attempted to address those issues and we are happy that at least the public is beginning to turn in that direction at last.

Corcan
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Jean H. Leroux Shefford, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Solicitor General.

Recently, a laundry in my riding bid for a contract to service hospitals in Granby and Brome-Missisquoi. They lost to CORCAN, which is connected to the Laval correctional centre and employs people being reintegrated into the work force. The private company, Buanderie Shefford, therefore lost a contract because it was competing with a company funded in large part by the taxpayers, and therefore able to offer a better price.

Does the minister not admit that this is a blatant example of unfair competition on the part of the federal administration, taking major contracts away from companies which are at least as competitive as Corrections Canada?

Corcan
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I do not accept my hon. colleague's hypothesis, but I would be most pleased to look into these allegations and to report to my hon. friend as promptly as possible.

Corcan
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Jean H. Leroux Shefford, QC

Mr. Speaker, I have risen in the House today because I have twice written to the minister, to the minister's office, without any satisfactory response.

The jobs of 15 people in my riding are at stake. The Liberals like to boast of creating jobs, but not in this case.

What guarantees can the minister offer us that CORCAN includes all of its costs in the bids it submits, and respects the same ground rules as its private sector competitors?

Corcan
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, CORCAN operates in compliance with the criteria, according to my information. I am sorry he has not accepted the information I have provided him with. I am, however, prepared to look further into the case, and to provide him with an answer shortly.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Reform

John Cummins Delta, BC

Mr. Speaker, department of fisheries officials in Vancouver tell me that four additional herring roe-on-kelp licenses have been created for the Heiltsuk band as a result of the Supreme Court's decision in Gladstone.

Could the minister confirm that the court's decision in Gladstone led to the creation of these licences?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Beauséjour
New Brunswick

Liberal

Fernand Robichaud Secretary of State (Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, yes, the Supreme Court clearly established that the nation in question had the right to commercial fishing and it was based on historical facts.

DFO, after several long weeks of discussion have come to some understanding, to an agreement with the nation in question whereby DFO and the Heiltsuk tribal council have agreed to harvest 100 tonnes of unallocated herring available in area eight for 1997, in three open pond licences. The 100 tonnes of unallocated herring now being allocated have a roe content of lesser quality which means, therefore, it is of lesser interest to the commercial fishermen.

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Reform

John Cummins Delta, BC

Mr. Speaker, there is no unallocated herring in B.C.

After hearing petitions from all parties, the Supreme Court recommended a judicial process to establish the limits of the Heiltsuk right. Why has the minister sought to subvert the judicially established process to develop constitutional law on the issue of native fishing rights, given that the fishing industry has spent millions of dollars on litigation to defend their rights and to establish sound, legal principles on which to allocate the fisheries resource.

Why has the minister replaced the law book with the red book?

Fisheries
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Beauséjour
New Brunswick

Liberal

Fernand Robichaud Secretary of State (Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, the government and the department of fisheries feel quite confident that they are abiding by the laws of the nation when they establish such a fishery for that nation.

However, we sincerely deplore the tone of the hon. member and all members of the Reform Party whenever it comes to discussing aboriginal rights to fisheries. This is really deplorable. But fortunately for those nations the Government of Canada will continue on its present course.

Health Canada
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Antoine Dubé Lévis, QC

Mr. Speaker, in a ruling handed down yesterday by the Canadian Human Rights Commission, we learn that Health Canada is discriminating against its employees who belong to cultural minorities in its appointments to senior

positions. This ruling imposes quotas that Health Canada must respect from now on in order to correct this state of affairs.

Will the minister, or his representative, admit that if his government is being told today to promote employees who are members of cultural minorities to senior positions, it is primarily because of its failure or inability to keep its red book promises?

Health Canada
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Liberal

Joe Volpe Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, that report refers to situations in 1992. The minister and the department have taken steps since then.

I remind the member exactly what has happened since then. The report already acknowledges that the minister has taken steps. First, he has taken a look at new guidelines for promotions, acting positions and training for supervisors and managers.

What has happened as a result? The member ought to acknowledge that the percentage of people who have come from those minorities, which he rightly defends in this instance, has risen to 5.9 per cent.

A true reflection of the matter is that we are, in the department, moving well beyond expectations that even the member might set.

Immigration
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Reform

Val Meredith Surrey—White Rock—South Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, on Tuesday, the minister of immigration acknowledged that she had instructed Canadian immigration officers in Quebec to refuse entry to any immigrant who had not been approved by the Quebec government.

Today, it was announced that while Quebec receives 39 per cent of all the money that immigrant investors bring to Canada, only15 per cent of these immigrants choose to reside in Quebec.

Is the minister prepared to instruct immigration officers in the other provinces to refuse entry to immigrant investors accepted by the Quebec government because they choose to invest in Quebec but decide to reside in and use the services of other provinces?

Immigration
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Saint-Henri—Westmount
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I think the Reform Party member has problems understanding Canadians' mobility rights, which extend across the country. It is very clear that, when investors come to our country, they may choose to go to another Canadian province, like any Canadian.

We are proud of this right, which forms part of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. There is no question of changing this basic principle.