House of Commons Hansard #140 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was children.

Topics

York North Town Hall
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Maurizio Bevilacqua York North, ON

Mr. Speaker, last night I hosted my 34th town hall meeting. The people of York North dealt with the politics of surplus, life after a balanced budget. They were happy to note that for the first time in a long time Canadians were in a position to debate priorities for the future.

They were pleased that we had regained our economic sovereignty that clearly outlined a vision for the future. They want a nation with a highly skilled, highly paid and highly trained workforce that produces value added products. They want accessible, affordable medicare. They want to be the lowest taxed jurisdiction of all the industrialized countries, reduce child poverty and build an efficient government. That means a clarification of

federal and provincial responsibility and lowered trade barriers between the provinces.

They view the sectors of education, science, technology and the environment as engines of growth and they want a government that invests in these areas to generate economic growth and expansion.

Town hall meetings have been a tradition in our riding since 1988 and on behalf of the Government of Canada I would like to thank all the contributors.

Status Of Women In Rwanda
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères, QC

Mr. Speaker, we have often mentioned in this House the terrible genocide that took place in Rwanda. Over half a million people, mostly men, have been killed, and over 250,000 women were not only raped, but often mutilated and tortured.

It is important to condemn this situation, because women currently account for 70 per cent of the Rwandan population. Even more tragic is the fact that 60 per cent of these women are widows, because of the genocide, and cannot inherit their dead husbands' assets.

Even though the international assistance to Rwanda in the last two years has totalled $2.5 billion, of which $75 million is from Canada, these women only received a meagre part of that amount.

In addition to condemning this terrible and unacceptable situation, I wonder how we could possibly ignore such a large group of the population, and I also wonder if the Canadian government intends to finally take action to help these forgotten women.

Canada Pension Plan
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Murray Calder Wellington—Grey—Dufferin—Simcoe, ON

Mr. Speaker, among the many myths that the Reform Party has continued to rant and rave about is the supposed 73 per cent increase in the Canada pension plan.

I have been asked by constituents what the actual increase in CPP premiums is to the average taxpayer.

The truth is that the increase in CPP premiums, together with the reduction in EI premiums, will by the year 2006 result in an additional cost of little more than $125 annually, or 35 cents per day.

Everyone wonders why Reform is making such a fuss over nothing if this is all it will cost to solve the problems with the CPP and put it back on strong financial footing.

All I can say is Reform members are not interested in the facts. All they are interested in is the politics of opportunism, the politics of envy and greed.

The Liberal government is committed to saving the CPP for future generations.

Tobacco
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

John Williams St. Albert, AB

Mr. Speaker, this is the first time I have heard a Liberal $10 billion tax hike as being nothing.

At the launch of the tobacco bill, the Minister of Health made a mistake. Twice the minister spoke ill about the effects of a particular type of tobacco. Twice he got his facts wrong.

When the minister was threatened with a libel suit because of his comments, he took the quick and easy way out. Instead of the minister apologizing himself, he passed the buck and forced his deputy minister to issue an unqualified written apology.

The minister did not have the courage, the integrity or the parliamentary morality to stand up and take the responsibility for his own words.

The minister alone is accountable for his actions and the actions of his department. When staff members are right, he is happy to take the credit. When they are wrong, he hangs them out to dry-

Tobacco
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Milliken)

Order. I know the hon. member knows it is improper to use Standing Order 31 for an attack on another member. He is getting very close to the line. I urge him to be more temperate in his remarks. He has 10 seconds left.

Tobacco
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

John Williams St. Albert, AB

Mr. Speaker, I want to point out the convention of ministerial responsibility says that the minister is accountable for what happens in his department and for what he says.

Disabled Persons
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Beryl Gaffney Nepean, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have been very fortunate to work closely with several Nepean residents who, as disabled persons, face real barriers in their everyday lives.

I have always been especially concerned with the challenges faced by people with disabilities and I had the privilege to work on their behalf when I chaired the Standing Committee on Human Rights and Persons with Disabilities.

I am very pleased to see that the budget has allocated $230 million for Canadians with disabilities, including more eligible expenses for medical expense tax credits, duty free entry into Canada for goods designated for persons with disabilities, the elimination of a limit on attending care expenses for disabled workers and the opportunities fund which provides $30 million a

year in partnership with service organizations to help disabled workers.

The two key thrusts of the task force on disabilities are increasing tax recognition on the cost of disability and reducing barriers to employment. I am pleased to see these as well in the budget.

Through these initiatives persons with disabilities who want to work can do so and, as such, can become financially-

Montreal Economy
Statements By Members

March 7th, 1997 / 11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, while separatists continue to scare away investors and to weaken Montreal by fuelling divisions among Quebecers, our government is taking concrete measures to help Montreal.

This morning, the federal Minister of Industry and his colleague, the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs and member for Saint-Laurent-Cartierville, announced a $32 million investment by the Canadian government.

This repayable contribution will help CAE Electronics Ltd, a world leader in flight simulators, develop its VISTEC project, a name that stands for visual technologies. The VISTEC project should lead to the manufacturing of ultramodern image generation and display devices.

This commercial investment by the Canadian government in the development of a promising technology will result in the creation of 200 jobs over five years at the Montreal plant. This is another concrete example of federal development assistance for Montreal.

International Women's Day
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Assad Gatineau—La Lièvre, QC

Mr. Speaker, International Women's Day is an important occasion, and the Canadian government has made concrete, albeit modest, efforts with regard to women.

Since 1993, the Liberal government has appointed 18 senators, 10 of whom were women. Of the 173 judicial appointments made, 59 went to women, which means that 34 per cent of all appointed judges were women. It is a respectable start.

The Prime Minister of Canada did not hesitate, in the last election campaign, to support women by nominating eight women as official candidates for our party. Four of these women were eventually elected and are now serving their constituents in this House.

These are all concrete and positive measures that really help-

International Women's Day
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Milliken)

Order, please. The member for Argenteuil-Papineau has the floor.

International Women's Day
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Maurice Dumas Argenteuil—Papineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow, March 8, is International Women's Day. I would like to say a few words about this event.

Women make up more than half the population, but they do not hold half the power, particularly not half the political power. Some countries do not even allow women to vote. In Canada, the proportion of women in the various legislatures varies between 15 and 20 per cent.

The percentage of members of Parliament who are women comes as a surprise. It is 11 per cent in the United States, 10 per cent in the United Kingdom, and only 6 per cent in France. Although there has been some improvement, a new electoral dynamic must be found that is more favourable to women.

Progress is certainly under way towards the equal access of men and women to political office, but it must continue if there is to be real democracy throughout the world. Scandinavian countries have almost achieved this representation and I express my hope this March 8 to all women that this objective will be attained as quickly as possible.

International Women's Day
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Reform

Sharon Hayes Port Moody—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, International Women's Day is an important opportunity to speak out for all women and all concerns.

Government policy and priority focus solely on equal workforce participation and economic autonomy for women. I speak today for many women caught in the time crunch of competing demands. I speak for the ultimate concern of many women, their communities, their homes and their children. I speak for their right to make choices and be free from economic and social penalty in raising their own children. I speak for the many men and women who recognize that some of the greatest architects, engineers and scientists are those who build and work not in the marketplace but in the shaping of our future generations.

Today I salute their right to be heard by a government that has been deaf to their concerns. Today I am proud to stand with the Reform Party whose fresh start policies include their voice.

The Late Dr. Cheddi Jagan
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Derek Lee Scarborough—Rouge River, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise to express sadness at the passing of His Excellency Dr. Cheddi Jagan, President of the Co-operative Republic of Guyana, who passed away yesterday at age 78.

Dr. Jagan was a political leader in his native Guyana for a period that spanned 50 years. His prominence and experience gave him a presence far beyond his homeland, particularly in the western hemisphere.

In addition to his lifelong contributions to the citizens of Guyana, a country of several cultures, he was a leader in the evolution of democratic left of centre politics, in the evolution of Guyana's economy and social state and in the transition from colony to independent state.

In a meeting in Ottawa last fall Dr. Jagan made it clear how Guyanese and Central American and Caribbean politics has affected us all in North America. With the more than 100,000 Guyanese Canadians and all the people of Guyana, we mourn the passing and the loss of Dr. Cheddi Jagan.

McMaster University
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Stan Keyes Hamilton West, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is a privilege to rise in the House today in recognition of the achievement of McMaster University in my riding of Hamilton West.

McMaster consistently ranks in the top five medical doctoral universities in Maclean's magazine's annual university rankings. In the fall of last year the UN flag was raised on campus, instituting McMaster as North America's first campus of the United Nations University Network on Water, health and the Environment.

Now McMaster has been honoured in Newsweek magazine's annual guide to graduate schools as one of six innovative medical schools in North America. McMaster is credited with being the birth place of problem based learning where medical students worked on real or simulated patient cases in a clinical setting.

McMaster president, Dr. Peter George, says that the Newsweek honour is a fitting tribute to the leadership of then university president Dr. Harry Thode and the founding dean of the new medical school, Dr. Jean Evans.

Since its inception in 1965, the McMaster approach to teaching and learning medicine has attracted worldwide attention.

On behalf of my constituents of Hamilton West, I applaud McMaster for its leadership in this field and congratulate the president, Dr. Peter George.

International Women's Day
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Bloc

Maud Debien Laval East, QC

Mr. Speaker, Quebec organizations working for the status of women called on women to unite and keep up their efforts on the occasion of International Women's Day.

From all corners of Quebec, women have worked together to create a cloth chain of messages, with each of the links symbolizing the solidarity that unites them. In addition, a human chain will surround the Montreal stock exchange, the hub of economic and government decisions, next March 12.

Women hope to show, by means of this demonstration, that economic equity and the fight against poverty are the cornerstones of an egalitarian and fraternal society.

I would like to pay tribute to all the women from Laval who are here today to weave this great chain of solidarity.