House of Commons Hansard #136 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was extradition.

Topics

United Nations Secretary General
Statements By Members

October 9th, 1998 / 11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the hon. member for Beauharnois—Salaberry selectively quoted United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan on the matter of secession.

In fact, what the secretary general said was: If the supreme court judgement requires a clear majority, if the majority of Quebeckers opt for secession, and if your constitution recognizes their right to do so, we too will have to grant that recognition.

The secretary general is therefore referring to a clear majority of Quebeckers on secession, and not a vague notion like sovereignty-association. He is referring to a secession negotiated within the framework of the Canadian Constitution, not unilateral secession.

In fact, he is saying exactly the same thing as the Government of Canada has been saying over and over again for the past two and one-half years. He added—

United Nations Secretary General
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for New Brunswick Southwest.

United States Immigration Act
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Greg Thompson Charlotte, NB

Mr. Speaker, while in Washington this week I met with several congressional leaders both from the Senate and the U.S. Congress.

We now know that we have a 30 month reprieve in relation to section 110 of the U.S. Immigration Act. However, this is not a permanent solution. What we need is a permanent solution.

What I am asking is for the Government of Canada to pursue vigorously a permanent solution to section 110 of the U.S. Immigration Act.

We enjoy the biggest trading relationship in the world between Canada and the United States. We want this resolved on a permanent basis.

Canadian Economy
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Réginald Bélair Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, this morning Statistics Canada has shown us that the Canadian economy is doing well, despite the shrill opposition predictions of catastrophe. In September, the number of jobs rose approximately 73,000, which raises the number of additional jobs over the year to 264,000. According to this same report, the unemployment rate remained unchanged at 8.3%.

Yesterday, the Conference Board identified some indicators that are a source of optimism for 1999. According to this most reputable body, the economy can count on real wage increases, strong exports and low interest rates, which will encourage business investment and, as a result, bolster our economy against the negative impact of the world financial crisis.

There is no doubt that the priorities of the Liberal government were the right ones: fiscal consolidation, elimination of the deficit, and the creation of favourable conditions for—

Canadian Economy
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

The Speaker

I am sorry to interrupt the hon. member. We now move on to Oral Question Period.

Solicitor General Of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Reform

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, last week the solicitor general publicly discussed a business relationship between Elmer MacKay and Karlheinz Schreiber of Airbus fame, something no one in the country knew about. Not even Mr. MacKay's son. Not even Mr. Schreiber's lawyer in Edmonton. There is only one way that the solicitor general could have known about this relationship, and that is because of an ongoing RCMP investigation.

The proof is in. The solicitor general publicly compromised an ongoing RCMP investigation. Will the government do the right thing? Will the government ask for his resignation?

Solicitor General Of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the operational activities of the RCMP are clearly under the purview of the RCMP. I do not involve myself in those operations. I would not know about those operations. I would not discuss those operations.

The allegations that were made earlier this week, I responded to those. My response has been supported. The rest of that conversation was a private conversation between myself and another Canadian citizen.

Solicitor General Of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Reform

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, this is a very serious and new charge against the solicitor general. There is no spin. There is no interpretation. There is no excuse for what has happened.

The solicitor general publicly commented upon and has now jeopardized an ongoing RCMP investigation. The only reason the solicitor general had this information was because he was trusted with this information by the RCMP, and he has broken that trust.

Will the government do the right thing and ask for the solicitor general's immediate resignation?

Solicitor General Of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the premise of the hon. member's question is unwarranted, as explained by the solicitor general. Therefore the direct answer to the hon. member's question is no.

Solicitor General Of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Reform

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, this is hard to believe. I do not know what it takes for the government to see wrong when it is staring it in the face.

The solicitor general knew of a business relationship between Karlheinz Schreiber and Elmer MacKay. Now the only way he knew that information was because he was trusted with that information by the RCMP. Then the solicitor general spoke publicly about confidential information given to him in trust by the RCMP.

What does it take? He has to go. Demand his resignation. What does it take?

Solicitor General Of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as I said categorically, and I will say it again, information that is acquired in an operational exercise by the RCMP or any agency is not information that I am privy to. It is not information that I am involved with. I would not know it. If I did know it I would not talk about it.

Solicitor General Of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Reform

Randy White Langley—Abbotsford, BC

Mr. Speaker, this was not a private conversation, now, was it?

The solicitor general's loose lips let a closely guarded secret slip, basically a business relationship uncovered in the ongoing Airbus investigation that no one else in the country knew about. No one else, with the exception of the RCMP.

If putting an RCMP investigation in jeopardy is not worthy of a resignation, just what is?

Solicitor General Of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as I said, I would never discuss an RCMP investigation under any circumstances. I am not involved in them. It is the purview of the RCMP.

The allegations that were made this week were by the member for Palliser. I responded to those allegations. I was supported by the person who sat beside me on the aircraft. I stand by my statement.

Solicitor General Of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Reform

Randy White Langley—Abbotsford, BC

Mr. Speaker, are we all listening to this? He did not discuss the Airbus situation.

Do the names Elmer Mackay and Karlheinz Schreiber mean anything at all to the solicitor general? Why does the government not just wake up and demand this fellow's resignation right now?

Solicitor General Of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:20 a.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, my answer is very clear and very categorical. The fact remains that the internal operations of the RCMP are the purview of the RCMP. I would not involve myself. I would not know about it.

The rest of the conversation, beyond the allegations to which I have responded, is a private conversation.