House of Commons Hansard #136 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was extradition.

Topics

Air Atlantic
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Guelph—Wellington
Ontario

Liberal

Brenda Chamberlain Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, on October 2 a waiver was granted to Air Atlantic regarding the 16 week notice period.

However, the minister has not granted a waiver on the establishment of a joint planning committee because he has determined that the provisions of the code have not been met.

Air Atlantic
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Charlie Power St. John's West, NL

Mr. Speaker, the minister states in his waiver that whereas the minister is satisfied that it would be unduly prejudicial to Air Atlantic to provide 16 weeks notice, then the provision is waived.

The Canadian Labour Code is meant to protect workers, not corporations. In the area of the highest unemployment in Canada workers need all the protection they can have.

Could the parliamentary secretary explain to these 435 people and their families why the Government of Canada chose to protect Air Atlantic and not Air Atlantic employees?

Air Atlantic
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Guelph—Wellington
Ontario

Liberal

Brenda Chamberlain Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, whether the minister granted a waiver of the notice period or not has not affected individual employee entitlements under the code.

The company has stated that all affected employees will receive, at minimum, their full entitlement under the code.

Taxation
Oral Question Period

October 9th, 1998 / 11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Sheila Finestone Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development met in Ottawa to discuss electronic commerce. The issue of taxation of goods and services is a very serious one and one of great concern to many Canadians.

Can the minister of revenue explain to us what the procedure will be to analyse the application of this tax and actual taxation procedure?

Taxation
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Vancouver South—Burnaby
B.C.

Liberal

Herb Dhaliwal Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, we had some very interesting meetings this week. We had the ministerial conference of OECD countries addressing the very important issue of electronic commerce and taxation of electronic commerce.

One thing agreed on was we do not need new taxes on business done on the Internet. We want to encourage business. We want to make sure there is neutrality. Fundamental principles were agreed on this week by the OECD ministers that will ensure we have growth on the Internet and that Canada can play a leading role in electronic commerce.

Forestry
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Reform

John Duncan Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, B.C. forest practices are among the best in the world. Forest products are Canada's largest export. A million Canadian jobs depend on the forest industry.

Meanwhile Greenpeace is organizing pressure tactics on major buyers in Europe and in the U.S. for B.C. forest products. It is spending $1 million to put B.C. forest workers and their families on welfare. The government has to take sides.

Whose side is the government on, Greenpeace or a million Canadian workers?

Forestry
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Natural Resources and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I have had the opportunity to review this issue in considerable depth with the responsible minister in the B.C. government. It was also a subject of discussion at the most recent meeting of Canadian forestry ministers.

Together with the industry, all levels of government are working on the appropriate strategy to make sure the world understands sustainable development practices in the Canadian forest industry and to explain to the world that when we manage our forests we do it properly and in a way that the world can rely on. We will continue to explain the Canadian case whenever we have that opportunity.

Solicitor General Of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

René Laurin Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is important to clearly understand what this issue is all about.

The Solicitor General, who is responsible for safeguarding major national secrets, is a chatterbox. He discussed his business in a public place, and a member of this House swears he heard him clearly.

Since there is ample evidence that the Solicitor General is unfit to fulfil his duties, why does he not do the only honourable thing under the circumstances and resign?

Solicitor General Of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I totally reject the premise of the hon. member's question.

Obviously, if the premise is false, there is no reason to ask the minister to resign or for the minister to change jobs.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Rick Laliberte Churchill River, SK

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are concerned about this government's inaction on climate change.

In June of this year 25 Order of Canada recipients declared immediate action on climate changes is required. The infrastructure works programs ends in March 1999 and municipalities are calling for an extension for climate related projects.

What action will the Minister of Finance include in his budget to support municipal climate projects?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Natural Resources and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada, prior to the last budget, was investing something in the order of $100 million a year in climate change related solutions.

In the last budget we also added the climate change action fund which is an additional $150 million over the next three years to accelerate the process, particularly in relation to new technology development and deployment.

The government is moving with the provinces and with the private sector in developing the implementation program which we hope to have completed by the end of 1999. What we want is a truly Team Canada effort.

Canada Post
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gilles Bernier Tobique—Mactaquac, NB

Mr. Speaker, recently Canada Post announced changes to postal services in New Brunswick to accommodate the 911 emergency services.

Residents of the town of Bear Island have always been well served by the nearby post offices in Nackawic and Keswick. However, the proposed changes mean that postal services are being moved to Burtt's Corner, a great distance from Bear Island.

Can the minister assure Bear Island residents that Canada Post will restore full postal services in their area?

Canada Post
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel
Québec

Liberal

Alfonso Gagliano Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, because of the 911 change in the province of New Brunswick there has been a restructuring and Canada Post has been co-operating with all the stakeholders to accommodate Canadian citizens and will continue to do so.

If the hon. member has a specific case I will be glad to look into it to see what I can do.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Derek Lee Scarborough—Rouge River, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of National Defence.

The appointment of General Baril took place a year ago and at that time the minister stated the general's annual report would be made public.

Will the minister confirm to the House that he has been able to fulfil his undertaking to publicly release his first report on the state of Canada's armed forces?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, this report was filed yesterday by the parliamentary secretary here in the House.

This report is important for a couple of reasons. It is, first of all, the government living up to a commitment it made that our military and its operations would become more open and transparent, more reports like this would be filed with this parliament, they would be made public, they would be available for public discussion such as at the Standing Committee on National Defence and Veterans Affairs.

With this report we have delivered on that. There are more reports to come. This report gives us the state of the Canadian military.