House of Commons Hansard #159 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was smoking.

Topics

Drinking Water
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Jocelyne Girard-Bujold Jonquière, QC

Mr. Speaker, we have learned that the federal government plans to expand the mandate of the Joint International Commission to all waterways and groundwater on both sides of the Canada-US border.

My question is for the Minister of the Environment. Since Quebec wishes to develop a water policy, does the minister realize that her project could constitute a new instance of federal government interference in an area that has always belonged to the provinces?

Drinking Water
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Northumberland
Ontario

Liberal

Christine Stewart Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, what this country does with bulk water exports is of concern to all Canadians. The federal government is committed to dealing with this subject. We will be bringing forward our decision very soon.

Health Care
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Prime Minister. Canadians from coast to coast to coast are saying with one voice that our health care system is in crisis. From patients to doctors to nurses to all provincial and territorial governments, everyone is demanding federal government action and a commitment to reverse this government's cuts to health care.

The Premier of Saskatchewan has made an important suggestion in calling on the Prime Minister to convene a first ministers meeting as soon as possible. Is the Prime Minister willing to take up this call, to take this first step of convening a first ministers meeting as soon as possible and to discuss the critical situation in health care?

Health Care
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I made a speech in September in which I said that the next investment of this government would be in health care. I said this long before premiers began asking for a first ministers meeting.

Bill C-44
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Mark Muise West Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, the creation of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation was an integral part of the previous government's redress agreement with the over 21,000 Japanese Canadians who were wrongly interned during the second world war. Despite the fact that their properties were confiscated and sold, the 1984 Liberal government steadfastly refused to apologize or even compensate these individuals for that shameful injustice.

Why is the Liberal government using Bill C-44 to once again turn its back on our Japanese Canadians by breaching the terms of the agreement that led to the creation of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation?

Bill C-44
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, Bill C-44 contains a number of measures that deal with accountability. Bill C-44 looks at the Canadian Race Relations Foundation just as it looks at all the other agencies. It is being treated quite fairly.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Deepak Obhrai Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, I hope the new solicitor general will not stonewall this question. Recently the director of CSIS stated that Canada is the number two country in the world when it comes to terrorist activity: “Terrorists have been provided a safe haven here”. He also revealed that it is becoming increasingly difficult to effectively combat terrorism.

While this government has the money to spend on millennium celebrations and tunnels for Senators, CSIS has had its budget cut by over $65 million. Is the government going to sit idle or will it act now to ensure Canada does not become the number one home for terrorists?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I can assure the member that Canada is aware of the problem and that we are addressing the problem.

Presence In Gallery
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

The Speaker

I draw the attention of hon. members to the presence in the gallery of the Honourable Antonio Bargone, Secretary of State for Public Works of Italy.

Presence In Gallery
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

November 25th, 1998 / 3 p.m.

Reform

Werner Schmidt Kelowna, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Public Works and Government Services referred to an RCMP report about the shredding of documents by Golden West Document Shredding Inc. Could we ask the minister to table the report so that we could have a look at it, please?

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, as you will know, this is not a legitimate point of order. A minister is compelled to table a report from which he or she quotes, with the exception of ministerial briefing notes.

The minister did not quote from the report. He indicated that a report was being prepared. I am sure, Mr. Speaker, that you will recognize the difference, as we all do.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

The Speaker

The explanation is correct. There is no point of order.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Liberal

Ben Serré Timiskaming—Cochrane, ON

Mr. Speaker, what I wish to raise this afternoon is more a question of privilege.

I was elected by constituents who are bilingual, francophone or anglophone, to represent them in a bilingual parliament and in a bilingual country.

Every time I rise to speak in English in this House, the Bloc Quebecois members yell “Speak French!” at me.

It is not only my right and my privilege to speak both official languages in this House. It is my duty.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

The Speaker

The member's point is well taken. We may address this House in either official language and I would encourage him and all other members to choose whatever language they wish to address this House.

In the course of the question period we sometimes throw words across the floor which are not always the best for us here in this House.

When members speak in the House of Commons, the question of speaking English or French should never be raised. You have that right and it is not necessary to repeat this. When an hon. member speaks in English, he should not be asked to speak in French.

The point is well taken. I reinforce the point and encourage all hon. members to please refrain from doing anything like that.