House of Commons Hansard #167 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was offence.

Topics

Business Development Bank Of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. the parliamentary secretary.

Business Development Bank Of Canada
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

St. Catharines
Ontario

Liberal

Walt Lastewka Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I want to make sure the member understands that the business development bank is an arm's length corporation. It operates on a fully commercial basis.

The business development bank brought in $1 billion in loans for small and medium size business and operates at a profit of some $50 million. In fact, it returned $6 million in dividends to the taxpayers.

Steel Industry
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Carmen Provenzano Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Mr. Speaker, Revenue Canada announced last Thursday that it has commenced an investigation of the dumping of foreign steel into Canada.

Will the Minister of National Revenue now assure Algoma Steel, all Canadian steel producers and Canadians living in cities like Sault Ste. Marie which are dependent on the steel industry that his department will complete this investigation without delay?

Steel Industry
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Vancouver South—Burnaby
B.C.

Liberal

Herb Dhaliwal Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I want to confirm that my department initiated anti-dumping investigations last week involving hot roll steel sheet products from four countries.

The department will complete its investigation by early next year and will impose duties if dumping is confirmed. If there has been a large increase of harmful imports and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal decides that retroactive application of anti-dumping duties is justified, duties can be initiated on a retroactive basis back to December 3.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Charlie Penson Peace River, AB

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of International Trade.

The continued blockade of our border by American farmers this weekend shows pretty clearly this government's so-called trade agreement was nothing more than a public relations exercise. It is full of nice words like consult, exchange of information and increased dialogue, but no action and no concrete agreement to protect Canadian farmers.

When will the minister stop finding nice words and get tough with the Americans with their subsidies?

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

York West
Ontario

Liberal

Sergio Marchi Minister for International Trade

Mr. Speaker, if he does not trust our words here is what the Canadian Federal of Agriculture said: “Congratulations are in order for both the agriculture and trade minister for Canada. The agreement marks a positive step forward in Canada-U.S. agriculture trade relations and is good news for Canadian producers”.

As of 1 o'clock this afternoon, the only blockade we can speak of is a group of farmers on Montana's border. The other blockades have ceased. This one, I am assured, will cease as of 4 o'clock. Trade was not severely restricted this weekend.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Charlie Penson Peace River, AB

Mr. Speaker, that is rather interesting because two things simply have not changed. The government's so-called deal with the Americans on Friday did not change the fact that Americans blockaded our border two days afterward. It did not change that we are still subject to high subsidies by Europeans and Americans.

When will the minister get out from under his desk and do something to help Canadian farmers?

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

York West
Ontario

Liberal

Sergio Marchi Minister for International Trade

Mr. Speaker, one has to wonder which side the trade critic for the Reform Party of Canada is on.

What he is asking is that the blockade should have been bigger and longer. If we look at what happened over the weekend, those blockades were already set. I believe, as does the American side of the equation, that this agreement led to those blockades being much smaller.

In fact, the only protest left is the one in Montana. It started in three states. I think the member should recognize that progress was made, which is also for Canadian producers themselves.

Poverty
Oral Question Period

December 7th, 1998 / 2:40 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance.

With the sting still burning from the UN attack on his government's abysmal poverty record, today the minister must be reeling from two more devastating reports.

The CCSD report blames the feds for the declining well-being of Canadian children, and the National Council of Welfare takes the hot air out of the much touted child tax benefit and condemns it for ignoring the poorest of the poor.

If the minister can pull himself out of his chair to face the music, will he commit today to invest the funds necessary to ensure that no children go hungry in Canada?

Poverty
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Oakville
Ontario

Liberal

Bonnie Brown Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, as I said on Friday, the government is always appreciative and respectful of the research work done by outside agencies commenting on the social policies of the country. We try to learn from those reports.

As far as the charge about the national children's benefit not helping the poorest of the poor, we have found out through our statistics that there are many children in low income working families who have fewer resources than those in welfare families.

We are therefore trying to help low income working families have access to at least the same resources as those on welfare and we make no apologies for that.

Poverty
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, poor people cannot survive on Liberal lip service any longer. The truth is that instead of reversing its dreadful attack on the poor, this government is set on providing tax breaks to the wealthy.

On Friday, the Liberal majority report of the finance committee called for billions in tax cuts for upper income earners. Will the minister promise today to stop catering to the wealthy? Will he do the right thing and commit to a real strategy to fight poverty in Canada, yes or no?

Poverty
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Oakville
Ontario

Liberal

Bonnie Brown Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, the member knows very well that a report from a standing committee is one of several advisories that is put forward to the finance minister.

The finance minister knows that it is a very high priority for this government and many members on this side to keep the poorest in Canada in mind. That is proven by the fact that we will have $1.7 billion in the national child benefit by the year 2000.

We believe that the best social policy is a job and we are proud of our record. There have been 103,000 jobs created in the last month alone, with more than half—

Poverty
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Brandon—Souris.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food will be going before his cabinet colleagues again with a revised proposal for farm income supports.

Maybe he could use a little ammunition. Since 1995 there have been 1,053 farm bankruptcies. Ironically, that is the same year that the Liberal government started cutting back on farm support systems.

When the minister goes before his cabinet colleagues tomorrow, is he confident that he is going to get a positive response from his cabinet colleagues?

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for his support and encouragement to this government to do something for farmers.

We take this seriously and we will continue to take it seriously. If we come forward with a program it will meet a number of criteria that we know it has to meet. I said before that it is my intention and hope to make an announcement before Christmas. I go by that deadline and we will continue that way.