House of Commons Hansard #62 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Point Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:20 p.m.

The Speaker

I am going to deal with the first point and then I will come back to the second point the hon. government House leader brings up.

I have Hansard from yesterday. I am looking at page 4020 and I do not see in this any quotation marks. That could be an error on the part of Hansard . I wonder if the hon. member could wait until we have the Minister of Veterans Affairs here. We will question him. If indeed he did quote from a document, I am sure he will tell us. Then we will proceed from there.

I want to go to the other point of order brought up by the hon. government House leader. I did not hear, either in the tone or the words that were said, the allegations that the hon. government House leader said were uttered to him in this House.

However, I will take it upon myself to review specifically what was said. I will review the tapes, the television tapes also, to satisfy myself that such was not the case. It is not parliamentary for us to accuse each other of telling untruths. My understanding is that there was no accusation made of an individual. However, I will review it and I will come back to the House.

Does the hon. member have more information to give us?

Point Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:20 p.m.

Reform

Monte Solberg Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, I am informed that the quotation marks were on the original blues that were sent out. They have subsequently been removed. I simply point that out.

Point Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:20 p.m.

Reform

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to request that when you review Hansard and the movie rights to this saga, perhaps you could also look at what the minister for ACOA said in the House with the tapes. That is a telling tale in itself.

Point Of Order
Oral Question Period

3:20 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member is right, this is becoming a saga. I have given an undertaking to this House. I will fulfill that undertaking and I will get back to the House.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Liberal

Peter Adams Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to four petitions.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Statements by Ministers.

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, I have a point of order under the item Statements by Ministers. It relates to points of order raised earlier about the ability of members in this House to do their jobs responsibly.

It is hard for us to do our job on a critical issue like compensation for hepatitis C victims when the Minister of Health is out there bashing the provinces instead of in here making a statement to this House.

Would it not be in order, Mr. Speaker, for ministers of the crown to bring to this House full details of such critical issues so that we can carry out our duties responsibly?

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

I think the hon. member knows that the practice of the House is that a minister may make a statement under Statements by Ministers when the minister considers it appropriate.

Over many years I am sure the hon. member has followed the proceedings of this place.

Complaints along the lines of that raised by the hon. member have been raised by other hon. members. They have suggested that somehow a minister in making statements outside the House is not fulfilling his or her functions in the House.

The Chair has consistently ruled that it is not a matter for the Chair to intervene in, nor is it a matter affecting the privileges of hon. members should ministers choose to make statements outside the House instead of here.

It is an opportunity for members to comment when ministers make statements in the House but the fact that statements are not made here I do not believe is a matter for comment by members on a question of privilege, nor is it one that relates to either a point of order or a question of privilege in this House.

While I am pleased that the hon. member has been able to air a grievance, I do not believe it is a question of privilege or a point of order.

Grant Expenditure Report Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Reform

Jim Abbott Kootenay—Columbia, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-359, an act to require every organization that receives a grant of public money to submit a report on the way it is spent that is to be available for public inspection.

Mr. Speaker, as members may recall, as the heritage critic for the Reform Party it has been a concern of mine that there have been ongoing expenditures of public funds, sometimes on very questionable projects as deemed acceptable by people from the Canada Council right through the heritage department.

It seems to me that the way to bring that under proper control is to create a situation of accountability, of transparency, of visibility regarding how these funds are being spent, and that is the purpose of this bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Transfer Of Offenders Act
Routine Proceedings

February 18th, 1998 / 3:25 p.m.

Liberal

Janko Peric Cambridge, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-360, an act to amend the Transfer of Offenders Act (removal of foreign offenders).

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to introduce my private member's bill which seeks to make amendments to the Transfer of Offenders Act. This bill was developed in conjunction with amendments to the Immigration Act.

The goal is to facilitate the deportation of non-Canadians convicted of crimes. This bill will assist the crown in the removal of such criminals.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Transfer Of Offenders Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Reform

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have two motions today. Motion No. 337 calls for this House to restore the taxes on cigarettes to the level existing January 1, 1994 which happened just at the time when the government dropped the taxes and caused the single biggest increase in consumption by youth this country has ever had.

It also calls for the tax rate on tobacco sticks to be the same as the tax rate on tobacco sticks equal to that on cigarettes, increase the rate of tax on fine cut tobacco, smokeless tobacco and leaf tobacco intended for retail sale so that this tax on one gram of tobacco is equal to the rate of one cigarette and, last, to improve the tax paid markings that are required on packages of tobacco products and apply the incremental revenue to health care.

Transfer Of Offenders Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The motion I believe is on the Notice Paper. Why is he rising on motions today? Could he explain that to the Chair, please.

Transfer Of Offenders Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Reform

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

I call for unanimous consent, Mr. Speaker.

Transfer Of Offenders Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

What is he asking for unanimous consent to do?

Transfer Of Offenders Act
Routine Proceedings

3:25 p.m.

Reform

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have another motion that I would like to ask for unanimous consent for.