House of Commons Hansard #99 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was federal.

Topics

Millennium Bug
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, my hon. colleague mentions an important problem, and we have given thought to how the government can most thoroughly ensure that the millennium bug will be properly dealt with.

We have warned departments to be careful not to add new electronic systems relying on year 2000 information so as to ensure that the system is not overloaded.

This is just a precaution so that we can ensure that the millennium bug has been properly dealt with.

Millennium Bug
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Mercier.

Millennium Bug
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, the report says, however, and I quote “[Contemplated] legislative, regulatory or administrative changes should be examined for their impact on solving the Year 2000 problem prior to proceeding”.

Will the minister level with us and admit that government priorities between now and the turn of the century will be driven not by poverty, unemployment or health, but by the millennium bug, if the government wants to be ready in time?

Millennium Bug
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, it is normal for a government to have to face a great variety of difficulties. One of these difficulties, and there is no denying its magnitude, is the millennium bug.

The Treasury Board is ensuring that too onerous a burden of administrative pre-requirements is not being introduced, because it is important that we deal with the millennium bug. There is no doubt that our legislative agenda will continue to include the government's priorities.

Hepatitis C
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Reform

Reed Elley Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, I would really like to know to whom the Prime Minister has been talking. I do not think it has been hepatitis C victims. The Prime Minister has not been clear. Either he is for full compensation or he is not. Either he will commit funding or he will not. Enough excuses. Enough hiding from the victims. Enough insulting the provinces. What exactly does the Prime Minister believe in today?

Hepatitis C
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member should have prepared his question on the day of this question period rather than the day before. At this moment everybody knows that the Minister of Health has asked to meet with all the ministers of health of Canada next week. In terms of money, we have put $800 million on the table while the provincial governments have put only $300 million on the table.

Hepatitis C
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Reform

Reed Elley Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister seems able to spend money on polls to tell us the truth but he does not seem to want to tell us what money he has for victims. Is this file open to compensation for all hep C victims or not?

Hepatitis C
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

The member should consult with his own leader. His leader wants to pay them when there was negligence so we will have to find out when the negligence started.

Assistance To Ice Storm Victims
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, we have learned that there are no more funds in the federal program to assist maple syrup producers restore their operations following the ice storm. This will force the closure of a number of work sites and the layoff of 300 workers.

However, three weeks ago, the Minister of Human Resources Development announced an additional $5 million to help victims, which we have yet to see.

Will the Minister of Human Resources Development confirm this information and tell us where he put the extra $5 million, whose whereabouts remain a secret?

Assistance To Ice Storm Victims
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot for giving me another opportunity to tell this House how quickly we acted in response to the ice storm.

By January 20, we had announced $40 million in addition to employment insurance and an extra $5 million. The other $5 million was used to set up regular teams across the area affected in Quebec, while $5 million was used to buy equipment so others could do their job properly. And we have heard nothing but favourable comments from the people of Saint-Hyacinthe.

Assistance To Ice Storm Victims
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, my impression is that we were not in the same place on the weekend, because no one has seen any sign of the additional $5 million.

I would ask the minister what he will do with the 250 maple syrup producers who have been promised help until November to clean up their maple operations, who are facing the fact no money is left and who are being left to their own devices?

Assistance To Ice Storm Victims
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, I have to interpret the words of the member for Saint-Hyacinthe as thanks for the $45 million already spent, particularly in his riding.

I think our department and our government provided a lot of help to the maple syrup producers who were affected. I made a quick trip to the region. The people there are quite happy.

The other $5 million was to go for equipment and to provide easier access for workers not eligible for employment insurance. If the member for Saint-Hyacinthe did not understand that, then he has not yet grasped how the system works.

Taxation
Oral Question Period

May 5th, 1998 / 2:35 p.m.

Reform

Eric C. Lowther Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the finance minister. Recently in Canadian Business magazine there is a report which points out that this finance minister continues to discriminate against single income two parent families. They pay 20% more in taxes. They have 6% less they can contribute to their RRSP. There is no recognition of the value of their parental care.

Why will the minister not stop his discriminatory practices to these Canadian families?

Taxation
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, surely the hon. member knows that there is a spousal credit already built into the system. There are benefits provided through the income tax system for families where only one parent is working. At the same time, my colleague the Minister of Human Resources Development put a second $850 million into the child tax benefit. The purpose of that is to help those families with low incomes and children at home.

Taxation
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Reform

Eric C. Lowther Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, in the last budget we saw a 35% increase go to those who choose institutionalized child care and nothing to stay at home parents.

I ask the minister, and it is the same as my question before. Why will he not answer and why will he not treat these Canadian families fairly?