House of Commons Hansard #115 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was judges.

Topics

Hepatitis C
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Reform

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, some of these individuals came to the meeting ready to come up with some money. Some of them came there saying they were uncertain if they could afford that. But at least they came with an open mind to listen to all the proposals.

The Prime Minister's officials came there with one thing in mind: no compensation for the victims.

Why did the Prime Minister say one thing in public and then send his bureaucrats with another thing? Why has be betrayed these victims again?

Hepatitis C
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, we have said the same thing wherever we have gone, that we want officials to look at all the options so that governments will be in a position to make a decision.

Listening to the member for Macleod taking bits of documents out of context, I think it is important for him to remember the welfare of the people we are trying to help in this case. I think it is important for him to remember he is a medical doctor as well as a spin doctor.

Air Transportation
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Minister of Transport argued that he needed two competitive airlines in Canada.

That said, the minister then candidly admitted that he is deliberately starving out Air Canada and favouring Canadian.

Is the minister aware that, by obviously favouring Canadian, he is preventing the normal development of Air Canada and therefore the creation of jobs in Montreal?

Air Transportation
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, there were extensive discussions with the airlines. We made what I think was a fair decision, not only for Toronto and Vancouver, but also for Montreal.

The notion that somehow we are favouring Canadian Airlines over Air Canada is not borne out by the facts. What we are trying to do is strike a balance so that Canadian's restructuring plan can go forward, which is in the best interests of its employees and all Canadians, also giving Air Canada better flexibility with more routes.

Air Transportation
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, be that as it may, Air Canada's CEO slammed the federal government for continuing to base the assignment of international routes on political considerations.

How does the minister explain that his government is blatantly favouring Canadian Airlines at the expense of Air Canada by basing its decisions on political rather than economic considerations?

Air Transportation
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, of course the president of Air Canada would express some reservation. He is a businessman and likes to get everything he wants. However, we in government have to take a balanced view. We have to decide what is in the best interests of all Canadians, and that is what we have done.

Air Transportation
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Beauport—Montmorency—Orléans, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would remind the Minister of Transport that one Liberal government was the cause of the mess at Mirabel and that another is hindering the development of Air Canada.

My question is for the Minister of Transport. Will the minister admit that his political decisions are not only promoting the development of Canadian but also slowing the growth of Air Canada by denying it such vital direct routes as Montreal-Milan just so as not to threaten the Toronto-Rome route held by Canadian?

Air Transportation
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we gave Air Canada the Toronto-Hong Kong route, and that is in the best interests of Montreal residents, because they can take advantage of the service. We also gave five code sharing preferences, which is good for Air Canada.

We have given five code sharing preferences for Air Canada and five for Canadian Airlines. We have said that we would review it in a year. We have said that Taiwan will probably be given within the year. What more does Air Canada want?

Air Transportation
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Beauport—Montmorency—Orléans, QC

Mr. Speaker, I do not see how the Toronto-Hong Kong route helps Montreal's development.

Will the minister admit that by intentionally slowing the development of Air Canada in favour of Canadian, he is also slowing the development of the Montreal airport?

Air Transportation
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

Air Transportation
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Notwithstanding the obvious vocal talents of some hon. members, it makes it very difficult for the Chair to hear the questions and answers.

Air Transportation
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, it seems that our friends from the Bloc are always singing the same tune, the tune of being aggrieved.

In this case we have taken a very rational balanced look at the air routes. We have said that it is going to be continually reviewed. Certainly within the year there will be further changes.

In the meantime, new routes and code sharing possibilities have been given to Air Canada. That will all benefit the travelling public not just in Toronto and Vancouver but in Montreal and in other parts of Canada.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

June 4th, 1998 / 2:25 p.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, the defence minister claims to support a policy of zero tolerance for sexual wrongdoing, but his actions do not match his words.

In February 1997 the human rights commission directed compensation for one of the victims recently named in Maclean's magazine. Sixteen months later, there has been zero action. Is the minister not sending the message that sexual harassment will indeed be tolerated?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, absolutely not. Provost Marshal Col. Patricia Samson today announced that of the 26 cases covered by the Maclean's magazine article, 2 will be reopened, 6 will require further review, 15 are considered new allegations and will be investigated, and 3 were determined to have been conducted thoroughly and therefore no further action is required.

We are taking action on this. We have put in place the mechanisms. We put in place the training to make sure we show support for our policy of zero tolerance.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, it is clearly a policy that it will be tolerated unless discovered and brought to the light of day.

We know the military justice system simply has not protected women. Yet the minister wants to keep sexual assault cases in military courts and away from civilian courts.

Under the military system women have been subjected to ongoing reprisals rather than redress. They have been victimized again and again.

Why should women trust a military justice system that has consistently failed them?