House of Commons Hansard #24 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was money.

Topics

National Highways
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Bev Desjarlais Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, right now 38% of the national highway system does not meet minimum standards. These bad roads cause avoidable accidents that kill over 200 Canadians a year. The national highway system has been a federal responsibility since 1919 and the Liberal government cannot blame the provinces for this.

Fixing the national highway system would cost 26 cents for every dollar the Liberal government collects in gas taxes. Will it commit in the next budget to invest at least this much in the national highway system so that Canadians can drive home safely?

National Highways
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I am glad to have the hon. member's support for upgrading the national highway system. As you know, Mr. Speaker, in the throne speech we said that there would be an infrastructure program with a transportation component. As to how much money goes into that, it depends on the work the Minister of Finance is currently doing in juggling other priorities and other demands for the very valuable money that is available. It is nice to have the NDP's support on this matter.

Royal Canadian Mint
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gilles Bernier Tobique—Mactaquac, NB

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Public Works and Government Services has just appointed Emmanuel Triassi as chair of the Royal Canadian Mint's board of directors.

Mr. Triassi is a generous donor to the Liberal Party of Canada; in addition, he and the minister have been very good friends for many years and belong to many of the same organizations.

Apart from the fact that he is a good friend of the minister, does Mr. Triassi have other qualifications justifying his appointment as chair of the Royal Canadian Mint?

Royal Canadian Mint
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Mississauga Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Carolyn Parrish Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, I am not in absolute control of all the information on this particular file, but all appointments, including those to the mint, are made by choosing the most qualified person and the best person for the job. I am sure that the person we have chosen will do a very fine job.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, around the world armed conflicts are increasingly taking place inside countries instead of between countries.

What we are seeing more and more is that civilians are being brutally targeted and hit by their brutal governments.

My question is for the Minister of Foreign Affairs. What is the Government of Canada doing to put a stop to this nonsense around the world?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Brome—Missisquoi
Québec

Liberal

Denis Paradis Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada has been working vigorously in a number of fora to encourage action regarding the need to improve the safety and security of people. This was highlighted in the Speech from the Throne.

Following our initiative, the UN secretary general submitted a report last September containing 40 recommendations for improving the legal and physical protection of civilians affected by armed conflicts around the world. The security council unanimously adopted the resolution presented by Canada.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Nanaimo—Alberni.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Reform

Bill Gilmour Nanaimo—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, last Wednesday the supreme court clarified the Marshall decision, stating that native Indians had no treaty rights on natural resources such as timber.

However, in response, the minister of Indian affairs stated that the government plans to negotiate natural resources with the native community.

Considering that under our constitution natural resources belong to the province and the supreme court has just stated that natives have no treaty rights on resources such as timber, what exactly is it that the minister is going to negotiate with the native community?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Kenora—Rainy River
Ontario

Liberal

Bob Nault Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, I do not know where to commence in the short time you will give me.

Quite frankly, the courts have said over and over again—and if we read the clarification that the court made last week it says very clearly—that the government should be sitting down with the province and the first nations to negotiate modern day treaties dealing with resources.

I do not know why I have to stand every day to explain to the members things that are obvious in writing. If they would read the treaty we could get on with giving the Nisga'a new economic opportunity in this country.

World Trade Organization
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Odina Desrochers Lotbinière, QC

Mr. Speaker, the WTO negotiations will be getting under way in Seattle on November 30.

Canada has met the commitments it made in the agricultural sector under the GATT agreements. However, our other major trading partners have yet to meet theirs, including in the area of export subsidies and in market access rules.

My question is for the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food. Before negotiating, should he not demand that the other countries meet their commitments instead of placing Canada's farming industry in a vulnerable position?

World Trade Organization
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister for International Trade

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Lotbinière for his excellent question, one that is highly relevant to Canada's position at this point, as we move toward the World Trade Organization negotiations.

This is in fact something we have noted. In Canada, we have honoured the Marrakech commitments. We have even gone slightly beyond, thus putting Canada in a very strong position to demand in Seattle the elimination of subsidies in the farm sector, export subsidies, because we respected our commitment as concerns supply management.

So that will improve Canada's position in obtaining new concessions from its partners.

Health Care
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, Premiers Klein and Harris, backed up by the Reform Party, want this country to retreat to the old, inefficient U.S. style of health care, back to the dark ages where they checked the purse before they checked the pulse.

The government has to be concerned about these developments and must know it has to take immediate action. It has to hold Alberta accountable for violating the principles of the Canada Health Act. It has to acknowledge that the only way to go forward, not backward, is to pursue innovation and improvements within the public health care system.

Can the government do that? Can it make that commitment today?

Health Care
Oral Question Period

Noon

Anjou—Rivière-Des-Prairies
Québec

Liberal

Yvon Charbonneau Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Health was very clear on this matter two days ago, before this House and in public. He will be a strong defender of Canada's public health system.

Mr. Klein has made proposals. The Minister of Health has agreed to study them. It is pointless for Mr. Klein to raise his voice and call the minister a hypocrite right now. The minister has said he will study the proposal and, should it run contrary to the Canadian public health system, the Minister of Health will rigorously defend the basic principles of the public health system.

Points Of Order
Oral Question Period

November 19th, 1999 / noon

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, in a response to an RCMP question from the member for Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, I mistakenly stated that the documents in the briefcase were not project specific. In fact, Mr. Speaker, they were project specific but they did not involve national security. I just wanted to set the record straight.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Scarborough—Rouge River
Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present the ninth report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs regarding the associate membership of some standing committees. If the House gives its consent, I intend to move concurrence in the ninth report later this day.