House of Commons Hansard #29 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tourism.

Topics

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River
Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present the 11th report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs regarding the associate membership of the Standing Committee on Human Resources Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities.

If the House gives its consent, I intend to move concurrence in the 11th report later this day.

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Reform

Dick Harris Prince George—Bulkley Valley, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-347, an act to amend the Criminal Code (desecration of the flag).

Mr. Speaker, over the last number of years, on occasion we have witnessed, through the media, people in the country who have thought so little of the symbol of our Canadian flag that they have taken actions to deface it, burn it and trample it.

I want to reintroduce this private member's bill to amend the Criminal Code concerning desecration of the flag to state that everyone who, without lawful excuse, burns, tramples, defaces or otherwise desecrates the national flag of Canada, is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction and liable to fines not exceeding $5,000, six months in jail or a combination of both.

I think every Canadian recognizes and is proud of what our national flag symbolizes. Certainly the people who have fought in two world wars recognize this. There should be no less punishment than a fine and/or imprisonment for someone who finds it fruitful for whatever reason to deface or desecrate our national flag.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Canadian Forces Superannuation Act
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-348, an act to amend the Canadian Forces Superannuation Act, the Carriage by Air Act, the Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act, the Criminal Code, the Pension Act and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Act.

Mr. Speaker, the bill would amend all of the acts that have been indicated in order to bring them into line with the spirit of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

I want to bring to your attention, Mr. Speaker, that in these statutes, believe it or not, we still refer to our children as illegitimate. In many cases, some of our federal legislation still has not really brought the dignity to Canadian children as they deserve and need to be recognized and supported.

This particular bill will amend these statutes and make it a lot friendlier to our children and also bring the statutes into harmony with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Competition Act
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-349, an act to amend the Competition Act (vertically integrated gasoline suppliers).

Mr. Speaker, I have been involved with this issue now for over 12 years. I have been responsible, along with the community, for at least three different national as well as regional inquiries. Every single time the report came back it indicated that there was no price fixing.

Quite simply, when we look at the Competition Act as it is, we can drive a camel through it. We are not going to be able to find out whether a company is responsible for price fixing or not. The oil companies are in a conflict of interest on a regular basis because they control the sales at the retail outlet and supplies the oil as well.

My bill would forbid Canadian oil companies from selling while at the same time retailing gasoline at the pumps. As a result of that, no oil company can be a retailer and a supplier at the same time.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Maximum Speed Control Device Act
Routine Proceedings

November 26th, 1999 / 12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-350, an act to provide for the use of a maximum speed control device for use on motor vehicles and to prohibit the manufacture and sale of motor vehicles that are not equipped with a maximum speed control device.

Mr. Speaker, on an annual basis, we have hundreds of kids and youths who are killed or severely injured as a result of joyriding or driving over the speed limit.

I do not understand this. We have set the speed limit in Canada and in most provinces at 100 kilometres per hour. I do not see why people have to drive 170 kilometres when it is illegal under the law.

My bill will make sure that no car will be able to go over 115 kilometres per hour. Cars will have a device within the engine that will either shut the engine off or make sure the car cannot accelerate over 115 kilometres an hour.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Wages Liability Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-351, an act to amend the Wages Liability Act (definition of adult).

Mr. Speaker, rather than taking the time of the House, I will, with your permission, ask the House for unanimous consent to introduce a series of approximately 35 private members' bills. The vast majority of those bills were introduced in the last parliament. I ask that all of those bills be deemed as have being introduced in the House of Commons today and be printed as set out in the order paper, Nos. 41 to 75.

Wages Liability Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House?

Wages Liability Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Wages Liability Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

An hon. member

No.

Wages Liability Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

I assume the hon. member for Ottawa Centre has given his explanation in respect of this bill.

Wages Liability Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Yes, Mr. Speaker.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Privacy Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-352, an act to amend the Privacy Act (definition of minor).

Privacy Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Does the hon. member wish to give an explanation on each of these bills.

Privacy Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would love to, but it is my intention to reintroduce it as it was set out in the previous parliament.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Land Titles Act
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-353, an act to amend the Land Titles Act (age of majority and definition of “infant”).

All of these bills deal with one subject, which is to bring our legislation into conformity with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, so that when we say “child” we mean anyone who is under the age of 18.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)