House of Commons Hansard #186 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was cbc.

Topics

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Liberal

Peter Adams Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, if the House gives its consent, I move that the 58th report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs presented to the House earlier this day be concurred in.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Does the House give its consent to the hon. Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons to move this motion?

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Having heard the terms of the motion, is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

(Motion agreed to)

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

March 1st, 1999 / 3:05 p.m.

Reform

Ted White North Vancouver, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise to present a petition on behalf of Liliane George of Grandparents Requesting Access and Dignity, along with 186 others.

They draw the attention of the House to the fact that grandparents as a consequence of the death, separation or divorce of their children are often denied access to the grandchildren by their guardians. The relationship that exists between grandparents and grandchildren is a natural fundamental one and the denial of access can constitute elder abuse and can have a serious detrimental emotional impact on both the grandparents and the grandchildren.

There is legislation in several provincial jurisdictions, including Quebec and Alberta, containing provisions to ensure the right of access of grandparents to their grandchildren. They are asking this House to amend the Divorce Act to make this possible.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Rose-Marie Ur Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36, I am honoured to present two petitions signed by residents of London, Sarnia, Exeter and Grand Bend. They urge parliament to ban the gas additive MMT, noting it is not used in Europe and most American states as it clogs emission control devices in vehicles and is opposed by all major car companies.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36, I am pleased to present a petition signed by a number of Canadians including some from my own riding of Mississauga South concerning the matter of human rights.

The petitioners would like to draw to the attention of the House that human rights abuses continue to be rampant around the world in countries such as Indonesia. The petitioners also point out that Canada continues to be recognized as a champion of human rights around the world. Therefore the petitioners call upon Canada to continue to speak out against human rights violations and also to seek to bring to justice those responsible for such abuses.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Liberal

Peter Adams Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, Questions Nos. 84 and 144 will be answered today. .[Text]

Question No. 84—

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Reform

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

For each of the last twenty years: (/a/) how many actual violent crimes have been investigated by the RCMP: (/b/) of these offences how many involved the use of firearms: and (/c/) how many of the firearms used in these criminal incidents were categorized as non-restricted, restricted-registered, restricted-unregistered, or prohibited firearms?

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Insofar as the Ministry of the Solicitor General is concerned, the answer is as follows: a) Violent Crimes Investigated by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Year—Violent Crimes 1978—35,400 1979—37,930 1980—39,665 1981—40,888 1982—44,550 1983—44,687 1984—47,983 1985—50,859 1986—54,733 1987—57,592 1988—60,158 1989—64,924 1990—70,236 1991—76,871 1992—81,040 1993—84,894 1994—85,139 1995—83,863 1996—84,499 1997—93,055

Source, Canadian Centre for Justice StatisticsL>E Aggregate Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR 1)

The statistics on violent crimes investigated by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, RCMP, were obtained from the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, CCJS. The RCMP does not have crime statistics in an automated format for 1978 to 1981 and must rely on CCJS statistics.

“Violent Crime” in the table refers to the total number of violent crimes investigated by the RCMP which includes crimes against persons, such as homicide, attempted homicide, sexual assault, non-sexual assault, other sexual offences, abduction and robbery.

It is important to note that CCJS's statistical information reflects the “Most Serious Offence Rule” which restricts the reporting of offences to CCJS to only the most serious offence in an event. For this reason, the number of violent offences investigated by the RCMP is undercounted by 2000-4000 when compared to operational police data maintained by the RCMP.

b) Violent Crime Incidents involving Firearms Investigated by the RCMP

Year—Homicide 1978—78 1979—65 1980—57 1981—61 1982—76 1983—68 1984—62 1985—60 1986—60 1987—45 1988—45 1989—47 1990—53 1991—58 1992—68 1993—59 1994—56 1995—43 1996—61 1997—51

Year—Robbery with Firearms 1978—263 1979—275 1980—290 1981—340 1982—457 1983—378 1984—381 1985—324 1986—335 1987—388 1988—317 1989—354 1990—438 1991—731 1992—734 1993—656 1994—597 1995—649 1996—736 1997—610

Year—Discharge of Firearms with intent 1978—n/a 1979—n/a 1980—n/a 1981—n/a 1982—n/a 1983—56 1984—69 1985—79 1986—93 1987—84 1988—87 1989—73 1990—97 1991—116 1992—154 1993—109 1994—86 1995—85 1996—82 1997—62

Note: n/a = Not available

Source: Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics Aggregate Uniform Crime Reporting Servey (UCR 1)

The RCMP does not have an automated system to indentify all crimes where a firearm was used during the commission of an offence. The police information retrieval system PIRS, is the automated indexing system for the majority of the RCMP investigative files. However, it is not mandatory to record all information on the system. PIRS serves as a pointer to the hard-copy files where the details of investigations are recorded, including information on firearms used in a crime. The hard-copy files are the only source of information that can accurately reveal all information on firearms the RCMP encounters.

The RCMP opens approximately 2.5M investigational files each year; therefore, it is estimated that the number of files the RCMP created during the past 20 years would be up to 50M. The RCMP does not have the resources for this type of extensive file review. We would encounter problems conducting this research, even if resources were available, since files have various retention periods ranging from 24 months after the date of conclusion to 240 months. Some files are retained indefinitely if they meet the general criteria of the National Archives of Canada. With all of these details in mind, clearly tabulating the requested information is an impossible task due to the records that no longer exist and the quantity of resources required to review the millions of files.

The RCMP uses operational statistics reporting OSR, to fulfil the requirement of reporting crime information to Statistics Canada. OSR is a far more accurate data source than PIRS, but there are data quality concerns with it. OSR is comprised of 1,206 codes which identify various offences, survey or service provided information. There are no OSR codes to clearly identify all instances when firearms are used to commit crimes. For example, AA01 indicates a 1st degree murder, but it does not reveal how the murder occurred. There are some OSR codes which do indicate a firearm was used or some other weapon. These codes include the following: AA34—Robbery with Firearms—Effective date: 1981-05-01; AA48—Discharge of Firearms with Intent—Effective date: 1983-01-04.

The OSR codes AC13, AC14 and AC15 identify weapons offences that include many firearm crimes, but without a detailed review of every file there is no way of identifying only the crimes involving firearms. For this reason, these statistics have not been included in this report. The following information explains the offences covered by each OSR code.

AC13—Prohibited Weapons—Effective date: 1981-05-01—Note that not all prohibited weapons are firearms. The existence of an offence does not mean the weapon was used directly against someone. The presence of a prohibited weapon is an offence. Offences under this category refer ot breaches of Sections 90 (Possession of Prohibited Weapon), 95 (Importing or Delivering Prohibited Weapon), 103(10) (Possession of Prohibited Weapon while Prohibited), 104 (Found Prohibited Weapon) and 105 (Record of Transaction in Prohibited Weapons) of the Criminal Code. It is not possible to determine how many offences in this category involve violence against a person.

AC14—Restricted Weapons—Effective date: 1981-05-01—Note that not all restricted weapons are firearms. The presence of a restricted weapon can be an offence; therefore, the existence of an offence does not mean the weapon was used directly against someone. AC14 covers restricted weapons offences under Sections 91 (Possession of Unregistered Restricted Weapon), 96 (Delivery of Restricted Weapon to Person without Permit), 103(10) (Possession of Restricted Weapon while Prohibited), 104 (Found Restricted Weapon) and 105 (Record of Transaction in Restricted Weapons) of the Criminal Code.

AC15—Other Offensive Weapons—Effective date: 1981-05-01—Note that this code includes much more than firearm offences and includes: breaches of Section 85 (Use of Firearm in Commission of Offence); 86 (Pointing a Firearm); 87 (Possession of Weapon or imitation); 88 (While Attending Public Meeting); 89 (Carrying Concealed Weapon); 93 (Transfer of Firearm to Person Under 18); 94 (Wrongful Delivery of Firearms, etc.); 97 (Delivery of Firearm to Person Without Firearms Acquisition Certificate); 100 (Prohibition Orders, Seizure and Forfeiture); 103(6)(b) & (10) (Possession of Firearm, etc. while Prohibited); 104 (Found Weapon not Prohibited or Restricted); 105 (Ammunition and Firearm[not Prohibited or Restricted]); and, 113 (Offences Relating to Certificate and Permits) of the Criminal Code.

(c) The RCMP does not collect statistics in this format. To even provide a partial answer to this qestion would require a labour intensive review of millions of RCMP files at detachments across Canada. The RCMP does not have resources for this undertaking.

Question No. 144—

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Reform

Ted White North Vancouver, BC

With respect to “E Division” of the RCMP in the Province of British Columbia: ( a ) for the period January 1, 1998, to date, what actual number of charges have been laid and investigative files have been opened; ( b ) what were the respective totals for the period January 1, 1997, to December 31, 1997; and ( c ) what were the forecasted numbers of charges likely to be laid and files likely to be opened for the 12-month period January 1, 1998, to December 31, 1998?

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

With respect to “E Division” of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the following information was retrieved from the RCMP Operational Statistics Reporting system:

(a) From January 1, 1998 to December 31, 1998: Total Reported Offences: 1,271,604 Total Cleared by Charge: 507,072-*

(b) From January 1, 1997 to December 31, 1997: Total Reported Offences: 1,380,769 Total Cleared by Charge: 514,386*

(c) see (a)

*Total cleared by charge indicates that charges were laid in these instances.

**Please note that the total indicated for “cleared by charge” for 1998 is accurate as of 1999-01-04. However, these statistics may change slightly since some charges will be processed in 1999.

Questions Passed As Orders For Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Liberal

Peter Adams Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, would you be so kind as to call Starred Question No. 154. .[Text]

*Question No. 154—

Questions Passed As Orders For Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson Burnaby—Douglas, BC

In the previous five fiscal years, and to date in this fiscal year, ( a ) what has been the cost to Canada of association with regional Development Banks in the following categories: (i) any annual dues by the way of membership or association, (ii) any contributions to loans or so-called rescue packages to foreign nations, (iii) any contributions to specific bilateral or multilateral development projects and, if so, to which ones, and (iv) any other costs incurred for any other purposes; ( b ) what has been the source of this funding (e.g. annual revenue, foreign loans); and ( c ) in each case, which departmental votes have been the source of payments?