House of Commons Hansard #194 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was housing.

Topics

Member For Edmonton North
Statements By Members

March 11th, 1999 / 2 p.m.

Reform

Diane Ablonczy Calgary—Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker,

It was 10 years ago The records will tell Elected to this House Was one we know well. Beaver River riding Was clear in its choice They sent a Reformer To give them a voice. They weren't disappointed For you may have heard That this is one member At no loss for words! Here, the welcome was cool Her courage, tested But Reform's pioneer Was never bested Hardworking and friendly She was a stunner Travelling her riding in A red 4-Runner Senator Stan Waters Soon joined her as friend And the next election Loneliness would end Today she's surrounded By colleagues who say We cheer our First Lady You're the best, Deborah Grey!

Nato
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Rose-Marie Ur Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow, March 12, the foreign ministers of Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic will deposit the official ratification documents to become full-fledged members of NATO.

I spoke in support of this matter two years ago to the day. Canada's leading role helped make this day a reality.

It will mean more stability in Europe and more security for Canadian soldiers in the region. It will mean strengthened links between Canadians of Hungarian, Polish and Czech origins.

These communities consider NATO enlargement as the ultimate guarantee for democracy, freedom and stability in their native countries.

As a member of parliament of Hungarian heritage, I was proud to meet last week with Mr. Sandor Papp, Hungary's ambassador to Canada. Mr. Papp conveyed that next year Hungary celebrates its 1,000 birthday as a state.

Tomorrow we gain new partners in NATO with shared principles of freedom and democracy.

Bioartificial Kidney
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, during National Kidney Month, it is appropriate to draw attention to research on a bioartificial kidney that is cause for hope for those with kidney problems.

The bioartificial kidney would be an alternative to transplants and dialysis. Implanted in the body, it would provide relief for thousands of sufferers. Two research projects are underway at the present time in the United States.

I have presented petitions from thousands of Canadians who support bioartificial kidney research. Ken Sharp of Peterborough has organized this petition crusade, which has resulted in the collection of signatures from all across Canada.

I congratulate Ken and all his supporters and wish them well in their continuing efforts to help kidney disease sufferers.

Organ Donations
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Bramalea—Gore—Malton, ON

Mr. Speaker, organ and tissue donation represents a personal gift of life from one individual to another. For many people in Canada receiving an organ or tissue transplant is the only hope for a healthy, productive life.

About 3,200 Canadians are on waiting lists for organ transplants. Last year only half that number, 1,612 people, received the organs they needed. Since one donor can help more than 50 people in need I encourage my colleagues to help Canadians improve a system in which supply has fallen tragically behind demand. Today's promise can be tomorrow's precious gift.

Member For Edmonton North
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Preston Manning Calgary Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, ten years ago on March 13, 1989 the hon. member for Edmonton North made political history. By winning a byelection in Beaver River she became the first elected Reform member of the Canadian parliament.

Since then she has become a tireless champion of grassroots Canadians, one of the best communicators in the House of Commons, a constructive critic of two governments that needed criticism, chairman of the official opposition caucus, the loving wife of Lew Larson and a role model for countless young Canadians.

Those of us who know her best know her as more than a parliamentarian. We know her as an outgoing, caring person whose heart is still humble despite all her achievements and who still values her family, her faith and her personal relationships above everything else.

We love you, Deb, and offer you our heartfelt congratulations on the 10th anniversary of your election to the Parliament of Canada.

Education
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval West, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, has just released a report on the performance of Canada's francophone students.

It reaffirms the great importance for governments, parents and organizations concerned with our children's future to do their utmost to ensure that our children are prepared for the new millennium with a quality education.

Not only does the future of our society depend on it, but so do the individual futures of our young people, who will have to deal with realities that are different, and perhaps more difficult, than they are today.

Foreign Aid
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, today the Canadian Council for International Co-operation has called on the government to improve our foreign aid policies. Our international reputation as a caring country has been under attack for the past decade. Liberal government cuts have caused Canada's aid to fall to a shameful low of .27% of our GNP, a far cry from the UN target of .7%.

More money for the foreign aid program is not enough. Canada's aid program is not doing the job it should, to be solely focused on the elimination of global poverty. New Democrats have long called for a move from donorship to local ownership in aid relations, to involve Canadians in development issues and to spend enough money to meet our global obligations. We endorse the call today of the CCIC to cancel debts to the poorest countries and to rebuild our Canadian aid resources to .35% of GNP by 2005.

I salute the efforts of the CCIC and all Canadians who understand that fighting poverty, whether at home or abroad, is the hallmark of a truly civilized society.

Might I join my voice on behalf of my colleagues in congratulating the member for Edmonton North on her 10th anniversary in the House.

Luc Plamondon
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Caroline St-Hilaire Longueuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, Luc Plamondon is arguably the most prolific lyricist in the French speaking world. He has written more than 500 hit songs, and has had a significant impact on the careers of a number of singing stars, among them Céline Dion, Diane Dufresne, Ginette Reno, Julien Clerc, and Fabienne Thibault.

His first major international success was the rock opera Starmania in 1979. Twenty years later, his prolific talent is being showcased in the hit show Notre-Dame de Paris , a modern-day adaptation of a classic of French literature.

Luc Plamondon believes in Quebec and in its artists. Over and above his personal successes, he has enabled many Quebec singers and stage performers to gain recognition in France. He has also been a champion of copyright.

Mr. Plamondon has received many honours over the years. His songs and his name have been on the lips of Quebeckers for many years. Today, finally, he is being honoured by the Canadian Music Hall of Fame.

Nuclear Challenge
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

André Bachand Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, last December, the foreign affairs standing committee tabled a report on Canada and the nuclear challenge. We are still waiting for the government to state its official position on that here in the House.

However, we read in the newspapers that the government seems to have a position on this issue, which it refuses to share with parliamentarians.

And there is more. The government is sending invitations to groups that share its position, which has not even been announced, and is forgetting the other side of the coin.

The consultation process is over. The government should stop inviting groups just because they share its views. If it wants the committee to continue to hear groups on the nuclear challenge, it must invite groups representing both sides of the issue. It is a matter of safety and credibility.

Info Fair
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Dan McTeague Pickering—Ajax—Uxbridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am sure I speak for all members on this side of the House in offering congratulations to the former member for Beaver River, now the member for Edmonton North. I am sure we will see her for another 10 years as the lioness of the House of Commons.

I want to recognize the work of HRDC in my riding that has put together the Info Fair. It put 15,000 youth in a situation where they could actually deal with the question of employment.

There are a number of people in the Oshawa area, in the Durham region, who should be commended for this. Over 2 days a number of partners including corporate sponsors IBM, Xerox and Power Broadcasting put together an opportunity to recruit many of the youth in our region.

I commend Sharyn Little, Merle Cole and Carl Gulliver of HRDC's Durham region office, as well as Julian Luke and Darlene Woodward of the Durham District School Board.

It is clear that when the Durham regional school boards work together, along with the local training boards and with linkages to HRDC and Canada's youth employment strategy, it is all successful.

Member For Edmonton North
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Jack Ramsay Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in tribute to my hon. colleague, the member for Edmonton North. I first met her in 1989 during the Beaver River byelection.

As we greeted the voters on the streets of Glenden I was amazed at the warm and positive response that came from complete strangers to this pleasant, gracious and outgoing lady. On election night I watched the voters' choice come in from poll after poll, amassing a landslide victory for Canada's first Reform Party member of Parliament.

For five years she alone represented the Reform Party in this place. I have heard her speak of that exciting period, marked by feelings of loneliness at times as she dealt with the barbs thrown at her by some members in the House.

I remember as well her speaking of the friendships she developed here and her deep appreciation to these members. And you, Mr. Speaker, stand out in this category.

For ten years this member has been one of Canada's finest ambassadors to this place, serving Canadians with great distinction. To the hon. member who now represents the good people of Edmonton North I say, on her 10th anniversary, congratulations, thank you and keep on marching.

Families
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Michelle Dockrill Bras D'Or, NS

Mr. Speaker, what Canadian mothers need is the freedom to choose between working at home with their children and working outside the home for pay.

Reform members believe the only barrier to women staying at home is the tax system. The fact that the government's changes to employment insurance prevent many women from even getting maternity benefits escapes them.

Canadian women want to know when will the government take the first steps toward allowing women a real choice and support them in their choice by repealing its anti-family changes to employment insurance?

Year 2000
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Beauport—Montmorency—Orléans, QC

Mr. Speaker, a few days ago, every household in Quebec and Canada received a brochure entitled Your Guide to a Bug-free Home Environment .

Designed and distributed at a cost of tens of thousands of dollars, this guide is supposed to be a tool to demystify the impact of the millennium bug on the daily lives of Canadians.

I read the brochure and I am happy to report to my colleagues that they can rest in peace; the government was successful in its research.

It is written in black and white. We can now be assured that our lawnmowers will not be affected by the millennium bug, and neither will be our dishwashers, vacuum cleaners, lamps, fans, smoke detectors, barbecues, pool equipment and snowblowers. That is what the brochure says. It is enough to make you want to mow the lawn in January.

Even if the year 2000 is still more than nine months away, it is obvious that the Liberal government is already deeply affected by the bug and has been for several months. Hurrah for the year 2000.

Markham Philharmonia Society
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Jim Jones Markham, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Friday the Markham Philharmonia Society held its gala premiere at the Markham Theatre. I commend founder and artistic director Christopher Cotton for assembling such a talented group of musicians for the society's debut.

The goal of this new organization is to develop a multifaceted arts program in the town of Markham, York region and the entire greater Toronto area.

With the professional orchestra of 40 players, a professional chorus ensemble of experienced singers, a community based choral society and a youth choir, the society is well on its way to becoming a showcase for musical excellence.

To cover the costs of its relatively modest funding, the society needs financing. I therefore call on all levels of government to work with community volunteers to ensure that the Markham Philharmonic Society has a bright and successful future in advancing fine arts in the greater Toronto area.

Young Offenders Act
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, after six years of delay the Prime Minister has finally agreed to changes in the Young Offenders Act.

Reforms to hold parents of young offenders more accountable and to give victims a greater voice have been included. For that Canadians can thank Reform MPs from Surrey North and Crowfoot. Beyond that Canadians will be disappointed today.

For example, why did the justice minister reject the recommendation of her justice committee that the age of application of the Young Offenders Act be lowered to age 10?