House of Commons Hansard #59 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was budget.

Topics

The Late Clarence Eugene Hank Snow
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gerald Keddy South Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, on December 20, 1999, after a long illness, Clarence Eugene Hank Snow died at the age of 85. Hank was one of the few remaining country music legends whose life's work helped define what country music means to millions of its fans.

Born in Brooklyn, Queens County, Nova Scotia, Hank, as a teenager, occasionally slept in Liverpool's historic CN Railway building, now the home of the most unique country music attraction northeast of Nashville.

In August 1997, I was fortunate to attend the grand opening of the Hank Snow Country Music Centre in Liverpool, which was established to celebrate the life and accomplishments of Hank. Each year a Hank Snow tribute is organized by the Friends of Hank Snow Society which features performers and a popular Sounds Like Hank contest.

The Hank Snow Country Music Centre and annual Hank Snow tribute will continue to celebrate one of country music's greatest legends even though Hank Snow is now “Movin' on”.

Foreign Policy
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, for Canada, the concepts of peace and security have a special meaning. They also translate into very specific action plans.

The government's focus is on protecting citizens and the rights of children in armed conflicts; stemming the flow of conventional and light weapons; implementing the Ottawa convention, the official title of which is the convention on the prohibition of the use, stockpiling, production and transfer of anti-personnel mines and their destruction; and fighting organized crime, drug trafficking and terrorism.

Canada is not alone in trying to better protect the public. A number of countries are working together toward the same goals, in order to improve the quality of life of citizens everywhere.

National Parks
Statements By Members

February 29th, 2000 / 2:10 p.m.

NDP

Rick Laliberte Churchill River, SK

Mr. Speaker, each year Canadians and international travellers visit our national parks bringing economic benefits and employment to rural communities across this great country.

The wilderness experience is shared by many generations and is the highlight in many a child's vacation.

When the Governor General stated in her throne speech that the government would continue to extend Canada's national parks system, Canadians were delighted by her commitment to our natural treasures.

Canadians knew that the Prime Minister's promise to complete the parks system by the year 2000 would not come true, but we hoped that the government would demonstrate at least some vision and direction toward this honourable goal.

There was no mention of Canada's park system in yesterday's budget, not one commitment to reverse the loss of ecological integrity, not one promise to restore interpretive and essential services, not one single word to extend our legacy of national parks.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, to no one's surprise increased spending was the number one priority in yesterday's budget with $86 billion in new spending over five years. Government members were so excited they gave the queen of the boondoggle a standing ovation and more money.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. I ask hon. members to please address each other by their titles.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Reform

Preston Manning Calgary Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister should have been outraged by the billion dollar boondoggle at human resources. Instead, he rewards the minister by giving her an additional $220 million of discretionary spending.

Why would the Prime Minister give a massive increase in discretionary spending to a minister who mismanages taxpayers' dollars?

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, when I hear the hon. member objecting to the increased spending, the $80 billion to which he refers, I have a lot of difficulty. This is spending for health care, for education and for research and development.

However I have really discovered the answer. He is not objecting to us spending money on health care, education, and research and development. He is objecting to Stockwell Day spending money on health care, education, and R and D. The leader of the Reform Party—

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Leader of the Opposition.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, for more than 21 years the auditor general has been warning and warning the government about misspending under grants and contributions. The Prime Minister is aware of these warnings but he chooses to ignore them.

This year an internal HRDC audit reveals more waste in the management just where? In exactly the same place. The Prime Minister's response to these warnings is to give the minister another $221 million.

Is the Prime Minister's contempt for the taxpayers so high that he did this out of spite, or did he do it so there would be more money around for the next federal election?

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the government over the last six and a half years has managed to take a deficit from $42 billion to being in a position to present a fantastic budget.

Of course we are spending more money for the poor, the underprivileged, research and development, education and health. At the same time we gave the Canadian people the greatest tax cut they have not had in the last 50—

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Leader of the Opposition.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Reform

Preston Manning Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, for once the Prime Minister got it exactly right, the tax cut the Canadian people have not had.

Under any normal circumstances a billion dollar spending boondoggle would send shock waves through an institution. All departments would be called to account. The brakes would be put on future spending. Management would be changed but not in this government. Sixteen out of nineteen departments got spending increases and not one manager has been changed.

Why should Canadian taxpayers give the government one more dollar when that department mismanages—

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

The Speaker

The Right Hon. Prime Minister.

The Budget
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. member had done his homework he would know that this money is going for a program that was announced in the House in December, giving more money for the people who are homeless in Canada. It was requested by the provincial governments and the mayors, and we have done it. He would know that this money has been given in order to give more money to the students in Canada.

We could go on and on. We always have causes that need help in Canada. I know the Reform Party, which might be another party with a very funny name in a few weeks, does not want to give money to the people at the bottom—