House of Commons Hansard #102 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-16.

Topics

The Unknown Soldier
Statements By Members

1:55 p.m.

Reform

Peter Goldring Edmonton East, AB

Mr. Speaker,

Whenever we embark On a voyage of remembrance We well expect that the trying time Could exact more human toll

The expedition bringing Canada's Unknown Soldier home from Vimy, France Was a wonderful effort by President Chuck Murphy and the Royal Canadian Legion.

Chuck was to see this millennium dream succeed. He was to bring an Unknown Soldier home To a final rest on Canada's soil; then he himself passed away.

Today we remember two soldiers, One unknown, who represents all war dead And the one who brought him home

Chuck Murphy, Dominion Command President of the Royal Canadian Legion Husband to Alice, Father, grandfather and friend,

At the going down of the sun and In the morning, we will remember him.

The Late Maurice Richard
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval West, QC

Mr. Speaker, we were all terribly saddened to learn of the death of Maurice “Rocket” Richard. He is mourned by his family and friends, and by hosts of admirers.

This man who wore the Montreal Canadiens' sweater for so many years was a symbol and an inspiration to many. He gave his heart and soul to hockey during his entire career. He has left an unforgettable mark on several generations of Canadians and was their inspiration.

For 18 years, the Rocket roused the passions of fans with his deeds, which rose far above the ordinary, and in his playing and in his courage he incarnated the hopes and aspirations of French Canadians.

His great qualities and his exceptional talent will reserve for Maurice Richard an important page in our national history.

Walkerton Water Supply
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Ovid Jackson Bruce—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, I know I am not alone today in expressing my heartfelt condolences to the people of Walkerton. In the past few days this small town suffered tremendous hardship due to the E.coli bacteria in its water supply system.

As a news story it has captured headlines across the country. As a tragedy it has brought out the best in people throughout the region. During this time of adversity the community has risen to meet the crisis head on, showing both strength and courage. Neighbouring towns, health professionals and area residents are making invaluable contributions of water, resources, time and support. They deserve our tremendous thanks.

I spoke to the mayor of the community. He asked me to express his appreciation for the support of all my colleagues, of all the towns across Canada, and of the Prime Minister. My prayers are with those who have lost relatives to E.coli. I hope that the people of Walkerton will rebound from this tragedy. I wish them strength and a speedy recovery.

The Unknown Soldier
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

Paul Forseth New Westminster—Coquitlam—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canada buried a soldier in Ottawa yesterday. We do not know his name, his hometown or even the circumstances of his death in battle. However we do know that he was young and that he died fighting for all of us. For this we pay tribute to the Unknown Soldier.

Yesterday thousands stood in solemn silence as a horse-drawn gun carriage wheeled the casket draped with the Canadian flag to the final resting place at the foot of the war memorial. Soil from the original grave in France, as well as soil from all provinces and territories, was spread on the casket.

This lad fought in a battle thousands of miles from home for all to have freedom, a freedom we sometimes take for granted. Still today tens of thousands of soldiers remain buried with no identification. Though unknown they will always be remembered in our hearts for what they did and why.

Brigadier-General M. C. Farwell, chaplain general of the Canadian forces said it best in his closing prayer, “Lord, you know him. You know him by name. And you keep him close to you forever”.

The Unknown Soldier
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

David Pratt Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday Canada laid to rest the body of an unknown Canadian soldier in a special tomb next to the national war memorial. This soldier's body which lay for over 80 years in the Cabernet Rouge cemetery in northern France was finally brought home last week after a formal ceremony at Vimy Ridge.

I had the honour and privilege of joining the official delegation in France last week which included the Minister of Veterans Affairs, representatives of veterans organizations, a few parliamentarians and members of the Canadian forces. It was an experience I will not soon forget.

I would like to pay tribute to all of those responsible for making the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier a reality. In particular, I would like to single out Mr. Chuck Murphy, former president of the Royal Canadian Legion who unfortunately passed away last Thursday only hours after returning from France. Our deepest condolences go out to his family and friends.

The Unknown Soldier
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Guy Chrétien Frontenac—Mégantic, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, a soldier who was returned to his native land after more than 80 years, was laid to rest not far from here. We will never know if he was a Canadian or a Quebecer, whether or not he was an officer, how old he was or where he was born.

We pay tribute to him because he gave his life for freedom. Because he is nameless, he represents the tens of thousands of his compatriots—soldiers, aviators or seamen like him—who lost their lives in the cause of freedom during the two great wars, in Korea and during peacekeeping missions.

His presence among us is a reminder that the price of that freedom was much suffering, the loss of thousands of lives, and the tears of all those whose loved ones did not return.

Let us never forget these lines written by Victor Hugo, which still ring true today:

Those who for their country gave their lives Should hear the prayers of many at their grave

Justice Jules Deschênes
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Ted McWhinney Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, Jules Deschênes, who died on May 10, was a distinguished jurist.

He was appointed to the Quebec Court of Appeal in 1972, as chief justice of the Superior Court from 1973 to 1983, and as one of the judges on the special UN tribunal on war crimes in Yugoslavia. But it is primarily for his constitutional rulings that he will be remembered.

In 1976, he upheld the constitutionality of the Bourassa government's Bill 22 establishing French as the official language of Quebec; in 1978, he struck down a section of the Lévesque government's Bill 101, in order to affirm the equality of French and English in the National Assembly and in Quebec's courts; and, in 1982, he struck down another section of Bill 101 limiting access to English language education.

A true federalist, Justice Deschênes understood the importance—

Justice Jules Deschênes
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Red Deer.

Health Care
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, after spending this past week in my riding, on behalf of my constituents I rise in the House today to express our concern for the health care system in peril.

Canadians across the country are concerned about their health care system and so they should be. The government's response to date has been downright insulting.

The budget that gave $2.5 billion over four years to health and education is an insult. A health committee that does not address the health issues of importance to Canadians is an insult. A health minister who is all talk and no action is an insult. A federal government that chooses to antagonize the provinces and refuses to work co-operatively with them is an insult.

Canada is the fifth highest spender and is in the bottom one-third of OECD countries for health care. We have farmers, educators, industrial workers and professionals concerned about health care. So they should be.

A government that is unable to address this growing concern is an insult to Canadians.

President Of The Hellenic Republic
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

John Cannis Scarborough Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, today I want to take the opportunity to welcome the President of the Hellenic Republic to Canada and to our capital city, Ottawa.

It is the first time since 1982 that such an individual has visited Canada. I take this opportunity on behalf of all my colleagues in the House to welcome the President of the Hellenic Republic as 350,000 Greek Canadians are celebrating.

It is very significant. He was the first official foreign visitor to visit the tomb of the Unknown Soldier the other day. I applaud him and welcome him.

Status Of Women
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Michelle Dockrill Bras D'Or, NS

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate Terry Brown, the newly elected president of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women.

Ms. Brown is the first aboriginal woman to hold this post. On behalf of the NDP caucus I want to take this opportunity to welcome her.

Unfortunately, women continue to fight for access to health care, child care and employment insurance. These are issues that affect all Canadians but often have a greater impact on women.

Unfortunately for women, good health care, accessible child care, decent employment insurance, violence against women and equality issues simply have been ignored by the government.

We in the NDP caucus recognize that these issues are vital to Canadian women and are a top priority. The question Canadian women ask is when will the Liberal government make these issues its priority?

Rimouski Oceanic
Statements By Members

May 29th, 2000 / 2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski—Mitis, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is with pride and great pleasure that I rise once again to draw attention to the great and convincing victory of the Rimouski Oceanic, the team that represented the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League.

Yesterday, in Halifax, the Oceanic won the Memorial Cup, a feat made possible by the quality of their play and by their discipline.

I extend my warmest congratulations to the players and I take this opportunity to stress the good work of their coaches and the uncommon support of the community.

Bravo to the players of the Oceanic. Their numerous fans, including myself, are elated and rightly so.

Bone And Joint Decade
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Greg Thompson Charlotte, NB

Mr. Speaker, January 2000 marked the beginning of the bone and joint decade. The secretary-general of the United Nations has launched this decade in collaboration with the World Health Organization and various national and international organizations for people with musculoskeletal disorders.

There are currently 21 countries whose national governments have officially endorsed the decade but Canada is not one of them. Fortunately however, Canada has put into place a national action network which includes 18 organizations that are working on the promotion of this issue. The Arthritis Society of Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research are both supportive of and taking part in this initiative.

I would like to take this opportunity to bring attention to this global initiative and thank all of the organizations that are part of the efforts in Canada.

President Of The Hellenic Republic
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Eleni Bakopanos Ahuntsic, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to welcome, along with over 300,000 Canadians of Hellenic origin, His Excellency the President of the Hellenic Republic on his official visit to Canada.

This is the first time since 1982 that a head of state of the Hellenic Republic has visited Canada at the invitation of the Canadian government. Canada and Greece have historically shared friendly relations founded on shared values for democratic principles, respect for human rights and international law.

One of the greatest moments in my political career was when I received, along with two colleagues of Hellenic origin, the Golden Cross of the Order of Phoenix for our contributions to promoting closer ties between our country of origin, Greece, and Canada, which with our Prime Minister, has given me the privilege of sitting in the House.

I wish to thank both the Ambassador of Greece to Canada who proposed my candidacy and the President of the Hellenic Republic, a great statesman, respected domestically and internationally, for bestowing such a great honour on the daughter of two Greek immigrants who chose what I consider to be the greatest country in the world as their second homeland.

Armenia
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Sarkis Assadourian Brampton Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, today Armenia is a proud independent country controlling its own destiny on the world stage. Unfortunately, Armenia has not always enjoyed such freedom and independence.

Following 600 years of oppression, independence was first gained from the Ottoman Empire on May 28, 1918. Tragically, freedom was shortlived as the communist takeover on December 2, 1920 was the beginning of 70 years of tyranny at the hands of the communist leaders of the U.S.S.R.

Celebrated as an important milestone in Armenian history, the 1918 independence, though brief, freed Armenia from the oppression of the Ottoman Turks and is the foundation of the new Armenian state which regained its independence on September 21, 1990.

I would like to join my fellow members of parliament in wishing Armenia a happy birthday.