House of Commons Hansard #91 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was parks.

Topics

Riverwalk 1999
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Rick Limoges Windsor—St. Clair, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate the Windsor Parks and Recreation Department and all Windsorites on winning the first Molson Canadian Achievement Award for Riverwalk 1999 as best community event.

Riverwalk 1999 brought together the entire Windsor community last summer in an effort to recognize the clean-up and revitalization being done to our riverfront.

Riverwalk 1999 is just one more example of what makes Windsor such a spirited Canadian community and one of the best places in the world in which to live.

Congratulations to the event organizers and all the participants for making Riverwalk 1999 an award winning event.

Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, May is Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month. Also this year the local Ottawa-Carleton Chapter is commemorating its 50th anniversary in the fight against MS.

This past year, through generous donations, the MS Society raised $3 million for 13 research projects and six research scholarships.

Since its founding in 1948, the MS Society has invested nearly $64 million into finding the cause, prevention, treatment and cure of MS.

During the month of May, volunteers across the country will be taking part in fundraising and awareness campaigns in support of MS research and in the provision of services to people with MS and their families.

I encourage all Canadians to join in this effort.

Taxation
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Diane Ablonczy Calgary—Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, momentum for lower taxes is gaining ground across Canada thanks to the surge in popularity of the Canadian Alliance.

The Ontario government has moved a step forward with a budget that cuts taxes significantly for both businesses and individuals. Most encouraging of all to Ontario taxpayers is the $200 rebate offered taxpayers on this year's taxes.

In taking such action, the Ontario finance minister holds his federal and provincial counterparts to a higher standard. Let us hope the federal government will not drag its feet on administering and mailing out these cheques. It never hesitates to collect taxes and it should be equally efficient when a refund is owed.

On behalf of Ontarians who are awaiting their tax refund and all Canadians who anticipate a Canadian Alliance government which commits to significantly lowering taxes, I applaud this trend to giving Canadian taxpayers their money back.

Drinking Water
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Eugène Bellemare Carleton—Gloucester, ON

Mr. Speaker, Wednesday, on drinking water conservation day, Environment Canada's Biosphere and the Communauté urbaine de Montréal presented the Biosphere 2000 awards.

These awards were presented to Stelfil Limitée of Lachine, to Buanderie Villeray Limitée of Montreal, and to l'École Édouard-Laurin and Manoir Inc. of Saint-Laurent, for implementing programs that help reduce their drinking water consumption and their waste water discharge.

The drinking water conservation day is the result of a partnership between the Biosphere and the Communauté urbaine de Montréal and is made possible thanks to the co-operation of the municipalities producing drinking water and the members of the joint committee on drinking water conservation and waste water reduction.

The water savings made by the award recipients total close to six million cubic metres annually, or 2.6 times the volume of the Olympic Stadium.

Congratulations to the winners.

Battle Of The Altlantic
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, this coming Sunday, Canadians will pause to commemorate the Battle of the Atlantic.

Canada declared war on Germany on September 10, 1939.

For six long years, members of the Royal Canadian Navy, the Canadian Merchant Navy and the Royal Canadian Air Force faced perilous conditions in a titanic struggle for survival in the longest battle of the second world war, the Battle of the Atlantic.

The liberation of Europe depended on the ability of the allies to deliver their precious cargo of goods and personnel across the Atlantic, making their way through the menace of enemy submarine wolf packs, hazardous fog and raging winter gales.

Canadians shared in some of the worst hardships imaginable. Thousands paid the ultimate price, leaving us with a legacy of bravery and sacrifice in the cause of freedom.

I invite my hon. colleagues and all Canadians to pay tribute to those who fought in the Battle of the Atlantic.

The Prime Minister
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Reform

Dick Harris Prince George—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, nowhere to run, nowhere to hide. The folks in the Middle East gave a huge sigh of relief when the Prime Minister returned to Canada and now it appears the Prime Minister is having trouble booking a meeting hall in his own country.

Even loyal Liberals are cancelling meetings when they learn the Prime Minister is about to show up because protesters are following him everywhere.

It seems Canadians want to send him a strong message. His Middle East faux pas, coupled with his gross mismanagement of the country's affairs, have made him a pretty unwanted guest.

It looks like Canadians will have to wait until the next election to send the Prime Minister a love letter that will not only shut down his computer but indeed his entire government.

The Netherlands
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

David Pratt Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, this week the people of the Netherlands are welcoming back with open arms thousands of Canadian heroes. These are men and women who helped to liberate Holland some 55 years ago. Tomorrow, May 6, there will be a commemorative ceremony at Groesbeek Cemetery where 2,338 Canadians are buried. Later that day, the town of Hardenburg will honour returning Canadian veterans.

To understand how grateful the Dutch are, we only have to listen to the following words from a first generation Canadian whose Dutch parents survived the war:

Canada has been very good to us, and I shall never forget the sacrifices made by Canadians to ensure that I would never know tyranny and oppression. I have always felt immensely privileged to be a citizen of such an equitable and well-respected nation, whose existence sparks hopes and dreams of a better life.

To our Canadian veterans I say, we are all in your debt. We offer you our humble and heartfelt thanks.

Parliament Of Canada
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Dick Proctor Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, most Canadians, including many members of the House, are outraged that two federal politicians convicted of serious offences are still eligible to sit in parliament.

Senator Eric Bernston, guilty of defrauding Saskatchewan taxpayers of more than $41,000, is once again free on bail to sit in the Senate.

Meanwhile, the MP from Crowfoot is free on bail after being found guilty yesterday of attempted rape.

The current rules stipulate that MPs can be barred from sitting in parliament only if sentenced to a jail term of two years or more. Electors find this repugnant and offensive. I believe that they are demanding a higher standard for men and women elected or appointed to parliament.

Canadians know that no business, organization, or trade union would, for one instant, allow itself to be tainted in such a way.

To this end, an appropriate parliamentary committee must be charged with reviewing cases such as these and find a more suitable way to deal with our lawmakers once they become lawbreakers.

Emergency Preparedness Week
Statements By Members

May 5th, 2000 / 11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Ovid Jackson Bruce—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, this week is Emergency Preparedness Week. This is the week that Canadians get together to prepare for eventualities or disasters that may occur.

There is an old maxim that says “If you fail to prepare, you prepare to fail.” There is no question that over the last 10 years we have been subjected to many disasters, such as floods, forest fires, ice storms and toxic spills.

Our military, the Red Cross and many organizations are working collaboratively to make sure that Canadians are safe.

This week we are holding forums to remind families, provinces and communities to get together to work toward a plan that will make these disasters less likely to create havoc in communities.

I urge my colleagues in the House of Commons and all Canadians to work collaboratively with their families to be prepared so that we do not have any major problems.

Minister Of Canadian Heritage
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Richard Marceau Charlesbourg, QC

Mr. Speaker, on May 1, the Minister of Canadian Heritage went to the ridiculous lengths of promoting “Canadian” culture in Boston with a beer ad. How clever.

How can Quebecers define themselves within this selection of Canadiana when the beer in question is not even sold in Quebec? Molson long ago grasped the specific nature of Quebec and serves us la Laurentide.

We in Quebec have a real department of culture, not one for heritage. What we fear is not comparison with the Americans but assimilation with the Canadians.

In Quebec, when we say we are bilingual, that does not mean we just know a few pick-up lines. Our objective is to make Quebec known throughout the world, not to go to other countries and put our foot in our mouth every chance we get.

Above all, when we in Quebec want some pro-Quebec advertising, we do not hire an American.

My name is Richard and I am a Quebecer.

My name is Richard and I am a Quebecer.

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Ivan Grose Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, as you know, I seldom rise in the House because I think we tend to say too much about too little. That having been said, I have a statement today that passes my quality test.

On April 27 Canada signed a political accord with British Columbia and Wet'suwet'en First Nation. The three parties have committed to work together to identify and increase opportunities for economic development in the Wet'suwet'en community.

The first nation is currently in negotiation of an agreement in principle for a treaty with Canada and British Columbia. As the House is aware, treaty negotiations offer one of the best ways to settle unfinished business and build partnership in B.C.

The Wet'suwet'en have already started speaking to local industries, including the forestry industry, to discover how this accord might involve them as third parties. The accord will also strengthen the already good relations the Wet'suwet'en have forged with their neighbours.

Strengthened economic viability benefits not just the first nations but its neighbours. This accord is a stellar example of how Canada, the provinces and first nations are establishing forward-looking, effective relationships.

Summer Student Employment Program
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Greg Thompson Charlotte, NB

Mr. Speaker, the summer student employment program is falling short of the mark just at a time when students need it most. Tuition fees have risen beyond our young people's ability to pay. Student debt is at an all time high. Student bankruptcies are the highest in the history of the country. These statistics seem to have gone unnoticed by the federal government. Not only do these programs help students but they help small businesses and no-profit organizations as well.

I urge the minister to transfer money from some of the less productive programs in her department, which taxpayers have no tolerance for, to programs that will help the students in this country. The future of the country are young people.

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Edmonton North
Alberta

Reform

Deborah Grey Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the HRD minister continues to claim that she has incorporated those recommendations in her six point plan from Deloitte & Touche.

Recommendations were made by Deloitte & Touche on February 2 and the minister made the final plan public on February 6. If we compare the early version with the final version, it is pretty clear that the minister was not in any mood for any revisions. There are no substantive differences between those two reports.

Why did the minister even bother to hire outside help when she knew she was going to ignore it anyhow?

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, it is my understanding that Deloitte & Touche was hired to look at the draft plan. They looked at it and made suggestions. The suggestions were taken into account in preparing the final plan.

It is important to note that a very important individual, an officer of this parliament, the auditor general, looked at the final plan and spoke to it with approval in the standing committee. I do not know why the hon. member is not willing to accept the judgment of an officer of this House, the auditor general.

Human Resources Development
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Edmonton North
Alberta

Reform

Deborah Grey Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, I do not think the auditor general was any more impressed with it than was Deloitte & Touche. Maybe then this minister, when she actually found out the horror of what was going on there, saw that she was totally responsible for it.

If the minister is going to make a claim, she must be prepared to back it up. The minister said that she had acted on the advice of Deloitte & Touche. We know she has not. It would be so simple to bring forward the truth.

Deloitte & Touche criticized the draft plan and there are no substantive differences between that and the final version. There is no clear underlined addressing of that in the final plan. Could the minister or her representative prove it? Read it to me. Where is it in that plan?