House of Commons Hansard #119 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Government Response To Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River
Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to five petitions.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Liberal

Andy Scott Fredericton, NB

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the eighth report of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

Pursuant to the order of reference of Tuesday, November 23, 1999, your committee has considered Bill C-3, an act in respect of criminal justice for young persons and to amend and repeal other acts, and your committee has agreed to report it without amendments.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

10 a.m.

Liberal

Andy Scott Fredericton, NB

Mr. Speaker, I also have the honour to present, in both official languages, the seventh report of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

Pursuant to the order of reference of Tuesday, March 21, your committee has begun consideration of Bill C-244, an act to provide for the taking of samples of blood for the benefit of persons administering and enforcing the law and good Samaritans, and to amend the criminal code.

Because of the workload generated by other matters pending before the committee, it has not yet been able to complete its study of Bill C-244. Therefore, in accordance with Standing Order 97(1), the committee requests an extension of 30 sitting days to allow it to complete its consideration of Bill C-244.

All-Numeric Dates Act
Routine Proceedings

September 21st, 2000 / 10 a.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-495, an act to establish a national standard for the representation of dates in all-numeric form.

This is a simple, sensible bill to avoid confusion of dates in the computer age. Its purpose is to promote the use of a national standard for all numeric dates. It proposes the use of the date form developed by the International Organization for Standardization; that is to say year, month, day, going from the general to the specific, so that today the date is 2000 09 21.

A standard approach to dates will avoid the confusion that commonly arises today from the use of different conventions, especially in computer-generated material.

I thank Duncan Bath of Peterborough and others who have worked on this important matter for many years. I urge all members of the House to support this progressive legislation. I urge government departments to take note of it immediately.

All-Numeric Dates Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Reform

Ken Epp Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. There is a private member's bill already on the order paper in my name in exactly this form. It would probably be out of order to accept another one.

All-Numeric Dates Act
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

The Speaker

I will respond directly to the member from Elk Island. We have had precedents where we have had two and three bills on the same topic, the same effect virtually. If one were to be adopted then the other two would be withdrawn at that time. I rule that it is in order to have these two bills on the order paper.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

NDP

Nelson Riis Kamloops, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is an honour for me to have the opportunity to present a petition pursuant to Standing Order 36 on behalf of, they say, 700,000 British Columbians. This is a sample of the 700,000 who point out that insufficient funding for the national highway system has resulted in hundreds of lives lost and thousands more injuries because of structural deficiencies in the highway system. They point out a whole number of reasons why national highway system funding as a priority would be a good idea for Canada.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

NDP

Nelson Riis Kamloops, BC

Mr. Speaker, in the second petition the petitioners point out a number of concerns with the Criminal Code of Canada. They are asking the Government of Canada to amend the code to prevent persons convicted of serious crimes from being released from custody pending the hearing of their appeal except in very exceptional circumstances.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise to present another petition from people in the Peterborough area concerned with homelessness. They point out that homelessness includes those who are visible on the streets or staying in shelters, those living in overcrowded, illegal, temporary or transient accommodation and those in imminent risk of losing their housing.

They point out that the Government of Canada has the ability and responsibility to affirm its national role in ensuring that all Canadians have access to decent housing.

These petitioners call upon parliament to make affordable housing and an end to homelessness an immediate priority by declaring that safe, affordable housing shall be a fundamental human right. This is a very appropriate petition this week as the ministers of housing across Canada will be meeting on this very topic.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

10:05 a.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have another petition from many citizens in Peterborough and the greater region who are concerned about the development of the bio-artificial kidney as an alternative to dialysis and kidney transplantation for those suffering from terminal kidney disease.

These petitioners call upon parliament to work and support the bio-artificial kidney which will eventually eliminate the need for both dialysis and transplantation. This petition was developed by Ken Sharp of Peterborough.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River
Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I ask that all questions be allowed to stand.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Speaker

Is that agreed?

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Request For Emergency Debate
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

The Speaker

I have received notice of an application for an emergency debate from the hon. member for South Shore. I will hear a very succinct analysis of what he proposes for an emergency debate.

Request For Emergency Debate
Routine Proceedings

10:10 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gerald Keddy South Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, as fisheries critic for the Progressive Conservative Party, I am proposing this motion for an emergency debate, seconded by the hon. member for Beauséjour—Petitcodiac.

Tensions are heightening across the country as transportation is threatened and the potential for civil unrest is extremely real. I have a report this morning that as many as 850 boats in Nova Scotia are prepared to steam to Burnt Church, New Brunswick, and there is more talk of native roadblocks going up across the country.

A search for a solution appears to have collapsed. The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans appears to be in conflict with the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. The Government of Canada is not speaking with one voice on this issue and the House needs to hear from the government.

Again, there is a real danger of civil unrest if the people affected do not see that there is a possibility for future discussions. A House debate would offer another opportunity for dialogue and movement on this issue.

The House and the Speaker should give the government another opportunity to talk to the communities affected by ordering a special debate. We have no other chance to raise this issue and a full airing must be presented to the House to avoid confrontation.

We, the Parliament of Canada, must be the voice to raise this issue and, through our debate, get people talking again. If we fail in this duty, it is my great fear that the people around Miramichi Bay, representing both natives and non-natives, will see this as an abdication of our duty and take matters into their own hands.