House of Commons Hansard #121 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was young.

Topics

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

September 25th, 2000 / 2:35 p.m.

Reform

Darrel Stinson Okanagan—Shuswap, BC

Mr. Speaker, young Leslie Mahaffy and Kristen French cannot celebrate their birthdays anymore. They were only 14 and 15 years of age when Karla Homolka helped torture and murder them. The newspapers are now showing Homolka celebrating her birthday in formal attire while serving time with other violent sex offenders.

My question is for the solicitor general. Where is the justice in all this?

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, like most Canadians I am disgusted by this crime. However, no matter how we feel, Correctional Service Canada has a role to play. There must be punishment for the crime and attempts at rehabilitation. That is exactly what is taking place.

Gasoline Pricing
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Brien Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Finance has intimated that he could reduce the GST in order to fight the significant increase in the price of gasoline.

Has the minister really compared the impact of a reduction in the GST to the solution we proposed, namely, a reduction in the excise tax, especially since the GST is refunded to truckers and transport companies in any case. Their solution for truckers is zero, not one cent more in their pockets.

Gasoline Pricing
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Etobicoke North
Ontario

Liberal

Roy Cullen Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the GST was under debate by the Alliance Party just recently. However, our government is looking for a comprehensive approach to this issue. The GST, for example, with respect to truckers, is fully rebated when they apply for the GST credit. In addition, if we look at the federal excise tax it is 4 cents a litre for diesel but in Ontario it is 13.5 cents and in Quebec it is a similar amount.

We are working very diligently on the problem. It is a problem for Canadians. We want to have the right solution that gets in the hands of consumers, not in the hands of the oil companies.

Gasoline Pricing
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Brien Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, the question is what will they do for the truckers if it is not to be this solution and there is none?

The situation is not going to be resolved with verbiage. What are they prepared to offer? We want them to lower the excise tax by 10 cents a litre immediately for consumers and 4 cents a litre for diesel. Why are they not doing something?

Gasoline Pricing
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Etobicoke North
Ontario

Liberal

Roy Cullen Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, two months ago, the Minister of Finance, here in the House, proposed to the provinces that they work together to find solutions to this problem.

However, as far as I know, the minister did not get many calls from the Quebec minister of finance.

We have a situation where we are trying to work toward giving significant relief to Canadian consumers. To do that we have to have the provinces involved at the table, not just saying things but actually being part of the solution.

Youth Justice
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Randy White Langley—Abbotsford, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians have been demanding changes to the Young Offenders Act for well over a decade now. After seven years, the government brings in minor changes which will not satisfy young people, the police, victims, or anyone else in the country.

Why is it that the government refuses to bring in substantive changes to the Young Offenders Act?

Youth Justice
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member and many others in the House know, we have been debating the issue of youth justice in the country for two and one-half years.

As part of our new youth justice strategy we have new youth justice legislation. It is before the House for debate now. Unfortunately there have been those who have attempted, dare I say, to distort or obstruct the process of honest debate on all sides of the House.

I would say to the hon. member that on this side of the House we believe we have a balanced package.

Youth Justice
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Randy White Langley—Abbotsford, BC

Mr. Speaker, let me give the House an idea of what the minister thinks is balanced.

Left out of this are changes such as allowing young offenders' names to be published when they commit violent crimes, carryover of youth records to adult criminal records, and allowing young offenders to include ages 10 to 15 years.

The Canadian Alliance would bring in these particular changes. Why will the Liberal government not? Maybe it is time we had an election to see who is closer in touch with the people.

Youth Justice
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. member is suggesting that we should criminalize 10-year old children, we on this side of the House profoundly disagree with him.

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Kamouraska—Rivière-Du-Loup—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government is showing tremendous insensitivity to the plight of people who have been at the mercy of its EI regime for years now.

But the governing party paid the price throughout eastern Canada in the 1997 election.

Does the minister understand that in these resource regions there are many more seasonal workers without jobs than jobs available and that this has nothing to do with their willingness to work but that it is a simple question of the absence of available jobs for them? Period.

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, on this side of the House we believe that the best employment insurance program is a job.

Thanks to our interventions and our partnerships across the country, we are making progress. Two million more Canadians are working today than were working when we were elected in 1993.

Having said that, I have had the pleasure of sitting down with representatives of seasonal workers from Newfoundland, the interior of British Columbia, New Brunswick and Quebec. We are looking at their proposals and if the employment insurance program needs to be improved, we will make changes.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Sue Barnes London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Health has announced the government's intention to develop a new regulatory process for Canadians to access marijuana for medical purposes. Some Canadians who suffer with illnesses like AIDS, cancer and other conditions already have access through the current process.

I would like the Minister of Health to outline for us what he is proposing to improve the system for the future because Canadians who are suffering today need this.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, since last June when I announced in the House that we would make marijuana available on compassionate grounds for medical purposes, Health Canada has allowed 70 persons to use marijuana in that way.

Since that time we have had the benefit of a judgment of the Ontario Court of Appeal with respect to the exercise of discretion. We announced last week that we have the intention of creating a set of regulations which will be in place we hope by next summer to put on a formal basis the criteria and the circumstances under which that discretion will be exercised, compassion for the sick.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Reform

Val Meredith South Surrey—White Rock—Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal government has finally made a commitment to return some of the money that it removed from health care but it still cannot get its priorities straight. Although the Liberals will not be increasing the transfers for health and social services until next year, they have lots of money to advertise how wonderful they are at spending taxpayers' money on health care.

Can the minister please explain why the government is spending money on advertising and not on health care?