House of Commons Hansard #122 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was animals.

Topics

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, while Karla Homolka is having a jolly good time in Joliette, Christopher Higginbottom who is serving 11 years in Warkworth for pornography and other sexual offences is currently being investigated for participating in a child pornography ring.

Can the solicitor general please explain to Canadians how it can possibly be that a child pornography ring is operating in our penitentiaries?

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I can assure my hon. colleague that this is under investigation. Any activity like this that can happen when we are dealing with individuals in the penitentiary system is investigated and will be investigated.

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Paul Forseth New Westminster—Coquitlam—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the solicitor general.

The whole country knows that the Liberals cannot manage. They cannot control drugs in prisons so they just give up. There is a trade in child porn inside the prison and they just wonder how it happens. The minister and his department have known of their management problems for years. In fact, the prisons seem to be con run.

In view of the deteriorating situation, what action has the minister taken? What will he do rather than just study it? What action will he take? Will he actually manage rather than limply monitor his responsibility?

Correctional Service Canada
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague for giving me the opportunity to indicate that we now have ion scanners in every medium and maximum institution in the country, which is very important. Random searches are done on a regular basis and drug dogs are used frequently.

The most important thing to note is that from 1993 to date there has been a reduction from 39% to 12% in random tests. We are making progress and will continue to make progress.

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Kamouraska—Rivière-Du-Loup—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Minister of Human Resources Development confirmed that her questionable decision on the rules of eligibility and the number of weeks of benefits available to the unemployed in the Lower St. Lawrence, North Shore and Charlevoix regions created two classes of unemployed persons, those entitled to 21 weeks of benefits, if they have worked at least 525 weeks, and those entitled to 32 weeks of benefits, if they have worked 420 hours, depending on whether they were accepted before or after September 17, 2000.

Will the minister put an end to this unconscionable discrimination, which will force workers and their families to apply for social assistance?

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, let me remind the hon. member yet again that in response to representations made by seasonal workers we are phasing in the changes to the employment insurance boundaries that reflect overall employment levels in those communities.

I also remind him that we have transitional funds available precisely for these workers to help them deal with the opportunities that may exist and to reflect their need for employment insurance.

The Minister of National Revenue and I are working in those communities and developing community groups to help us build new opportunities. I hope the hon. member will join—

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Brampton West—Mississauga.

Yugoslavia
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Colleen Beaumier Brampton West—Mississauga, ON

Mr. Speaker, in recent days we have watched the people of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia courageously participate widely in the presidential elections, despite facing an electoral process that may not be fair and free.

What is Canada's reaction to recent unofficial reports that the voters have elected opposition candidate Kostunica?

Yugoslavia
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Brome—Missisquoi
Québec

Liberal

Denis Paradis Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we applaud the courage of all citizens of Yugoslavia, who turned out in massive numbers to vote, in a context clearly devoid of freedom and justice.

We encourage the Yugoslavian authorities to recognize the will of the people, and hope to see the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia rejoin the society of democratic nations.

As soon as a government committed to reform and reconciliation is in place we will initiate the removing of sanctions, ending the isolation of Yugoslavia and increasing assistance to support political and economic reform.

Health
Oral Question Period

September 26th, 2000 / 2:45 p.m.

Reform

Val Meredith South Surrey—White Rock—Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, universality in health care does not exist. Tim Jeffries, a Canadian, was lying on an operating room table at the Peace Arch hospital in White Rock waiting for surgery to repair a broken ankle. However, when the medical staff learned that his health care premiums had lapsed, they refused to operate on Jeffries unless he came up with $1,300 cash or a credit card.

Where was the Minister of Health to protect the principle of universality when Tim Jeffries was taken off that operating table?

Health
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, indeed we are there to protect the principles of universality.

The Leader of the Opposition expressed the fond hope last week that in view of the agreement for medicare renewal health care would not be an issue in the coming election. We are here to tell him that health care will be an issue in the coming election but perhaps not the way he would like to see it.

The issue will be whether Canadians support the Alliance approach of gutting the Canada Health Act, turning over all revenue to the provinces and taking Ottawa out of the position to enforce the principles. That will not happen.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Reform

Val Meredith South Surrey—White Rock—Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, under the minister's watch Tim Jeffries was left to be taken out of the operating room.

Tim Jeffries is not alone. It is estimated that 200,000 British Columbians are not covered. That is almost 5% of the population of that province who are not covered under that provincial health plan, which is a contravention of the Canada Health Act. What has the self-proclaimed defender of the Canada Health Act done? Absolutely nothing.

How could Canadians possibly believe that the minister will defend universality and the Canadian Health Act?

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, we will be there to do just that, but we would not be if we followed the policies of the Alliance. The Alliance would turn all the revenues over to the provinces. As the Leader of the Opposition said in his letter to the premiers, the Alliance would leave it to the provinces to interpret the Canada Health Act.

The Leader of the Opposition would give provinces the right to withdraw from all social programs with compensation. That would result in 10 different health care systems across the country. We would lose something that is part of the foundation of the nation. That will be an issue in the next federal election. Canadians will choose the Liberal vision—

Health
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Vancouver East.

Child Care
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal government takes the cake when it comes to broken promises to kids. Seven years of broken promises has produced exactly zero spaces for child care in Canada. The latest reports today show that these broken promises are now taking a high toll in terms of inadequate funding and undervalued work in child care.

I have a question for the Prime Minister. Why has the government abandoned its commitment to create quality and accessible child care spaces for seven years? Why have they not been created for parents and children?