House of Commons Hansard #98 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was crtc.

Topics

Anti-Terrorism Legislation
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for Prince Albert.

Anti-Terrorism Legislation
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Brian Fitzpatrick Prince Albert, SK

Talk about bluster, Mr. Speaker. The anti-terrorism bill proposes many changes that would restrict the civil liberties of law-abiding Canadian citizens.

Why is the government focusing more on policing law-abiding citizens within Canada than stopping terrorists and dangerous people from getting into the country in the first place?

Anti-Terrorism Legislation
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Liberal

Elinor Caplan Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, that is simply not true. Whenever we have evidence that someone poses a risk to Canada, be that a security risk or a criminality risk, we arrest them, we detain them and we keep them there as long as we have to until we are able to remove them and deport them from this country. To suggest otherwise is just wrong and it sends the wrong message to Canadians.

I would ask the member to be sure that what he is saying is accurate and factual because so far he is not.

Canadian Security Intelligence Service
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, former minister Lloyd Axworthy and the present Minister of Foreign Affairs have denied allegations that CSIS was conducting secret operations outside Canada.

Yesterday, CSIS director, Ward Elcock, said the opposite.

Will the solicitor general confirm whether or not CSIS is involved in espionage activities outside Canada?

Canadian Security Intelligence Service
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as I have said a number of times in this House, CSIS has the authority to investigate any activity that threatens security inside or outside of Canada. It has that authority and it fulfills that mandate.

Canadian Security Intelligence Service
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, in light of what the Minister of Foreign Affairs has said, is the solicitor general saying that CSIS is involved in espionage activities outside Canada without the government's approval?

Canadian Security Intelligence Service
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, what I am telling my hon. colleague, and I have said this many times in the House, is that CSIS has the authority to investigate, inside of this country and outside of this country, any activity that threatens Canada. That is the mandate of CSIS.

National Security
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Premier of Quebec joined with his counterpart in British Columbia to call for the creation of a North American security perimeter.

The two leaders pointed out that such a perimeter would facilitate the movement of goods between Canada and the U.S.

Why is the government still stubbornly ignoring this suggestion, which makes perfect sense and which will provide protection as well as being good for trade and employment?

National Security
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of National Revenue and Secretary of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, the government has already demonstrated a great deal of leadership and vision in this area.

As for the perimeter, what does the hon. member mean by this? If reference to a perimeter refers essentially to the definition of customs, which addresses the protection of ports and airports, then yes that is a perimeter.

The only thing to which reference is then being made is the basic principle of the customs system, which is a matter of proper risk assessment and management. In that context, there is no doubt whatsoever that there is a greater risk at international ports and airports. Customs is, however, already doing a good job in this area.

The reform we have put in place, which is in the process of being passed by the House of Commons, will also do an excellent job of creating an ultra-modern customs system.

National Security
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, the problem is the government is talking, not doing. Premiers Landry, Campbell, Lord and Harris have all asked for this security perimeter. They represent the concerns of millions of Canadians who want to protect their jobs.

Why does this government not take the advice of these four premiers, as well as the advice of Canadians, and work with our counterparts in the United States to erect this security perimeter, which we need to protect our jobs and our trade?

National Security
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of National Revenue and Secretary of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, as far as the customs system is concerned, we cannot work in the abstract; concrete action must be taken. This means co-operative action as well.

Once again, if by perimeter, international ports and airports are being referred to, I would like to point out, in connection with concrete actions, that last June we in customs announced a particular initiative in Montreal, with more funds and more resources devoted to technology.

If the hon. member kept abreast of policy developments, he would know that last week we also announced the allocation of additional resources and more technology for ports, airports and postal centres, as well as more funding for technology. We are very much taking a lead role.

Health
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Charles Hubbard Miramichi, NB

Mr. Speaker, it has been said that sometimes our greatest fear is fear itself. Recently we have heard members of the opposition and some members of the media talking about bioterrorism.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health give us a statement on behalf of Health Canada on what it is doing to make sure Canadians are ready for any possible attack on bioterrorists?

Health
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Madawaska—Restigouche
New Brunswick

Liberal

Jeannot Castonguay Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I must say that I agree with the hon. member. We must look at the situation from a certain perspective. We must realize that there are threats, but we must remain calm and face the situation from a global perspective.

Yesterday, in order to improve the security and health of Canadians, the minister announced initiatives totalling close to $12 million, including close to $6 million to buy pharmaceutical products, close to $2.25 million to buy equipment for possible radio nuclear incidents, $2.12 million to improve a--

Health
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for Cypress Hills--Grasslands.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

October 19th, 2001 / 11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

David Anderson Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

Mr. Speaker, Canada's agriculture and food supply are easy targets for bioterrorism. So far the government's response to protect our food supply has been nothing. This is not good enough.

Last April, Dr. André Gravel, executive vice president of the CFIA stated that the threat of bioterrorism to our food supply is “a real threat and clearly a real possibility”.

Why has the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food taken no action to protect our food supply?