House of Commons Hansard #117 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was security.

Topics

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the U.S. deputy secretary of defence said that there was evidence that Iraq continues to build chemical and nuclear weapons.

On Tuesday, the Prime Minister said in this House that military operations would not be extended to other areas unless there was evidence that such action was necessary. But he was talking about links between the attacks in New York City and Iraq.

Can the minister tell us if the recent comments of the U.S. deputy secretary of defence will change Canada's position regarding Iraq?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, it has long been known that Iraq has been attempting to develop weapons of mass destruction and has a sorry history with respect to them and the use of chemical and biological weapons even on its own people. We have sanctions against Iraq. Canada is part of implementing those sanctions against Iraq.

In terms of the operations that are presently going on against Afghanistan and any broadening of them beyond that, those decisions have yet to be made. The Prime Minister made that quite clear yesterday.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, the fight against terrorism must not become a pretext to finish the gulf war and go after Iraq, at the risk of breaking the anti-terrorism coalition.

Considering the potential dangers and the possible abuse, should the Minister of Foreign Affairs not meet his U.S. counterpart to reiterate the position presented in this House?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, it has been said right from the beginning by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, by myself and of course by the Prime Minister that this campaign against terrorism is one that will be many years in length and it will be multi-dimensional. It is not just a military campaign, in fact the military campaign in all cases will be the last resort.

There are many other ways. We need to cut off the funding. We need to cut off the recruitment. We need to bring these terrorist organizations down so they cease to be a threat to the people in the free world, particularly the people of our country and our neighbour to the south.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Leon Benoit Lakeland, AB

Mr. Speaker, I think it is safe to say that we are all very proud of our soldiers who we may be sending to Afghanistan.

What we would like to know is how we are going to get them there and how we are going to get their equipment there. Yesterday the minister said that we did not need the Hercules aircraft to get them and their equipment there. He said that we could use the airbus instead.

Could the minister explain to us, if he possibly could, how we are going to get our military jeeps on an airbus?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I am glad to hear the hon. member talk about having pride in the Canadian forces because it was a colleague of his who got up in the House earlier this week and took the name that our loyal troops gave to their mission, Operation Apollo, and called it operation appalling. That party is appalling. That party has no respect for the Canadian forces.

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Leon Benoit Lakeland, AB

What is appalling, Mr. Speaker, is that the government would in any way question the commitment of this party to our military.

The government simply does not have enough planes to get our men and our equipment over to Afghanistan. That is a fact. How will he do it? Will he perhaps commandeer another ship like the Katie ?

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, our troops and the light infantry battalion will be airlifted. We have never had a problem getting our troops into theatre before. They always get there. They are always among the first there.

There are other means, with our allies, that we can use to get our troops over there other than Hercules. Most of our Hercules can be ready to operate if we need them.

Afghanistan
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Parrish Mississauga Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canada's time honoured role and expertise in peacekeeping and post-conflict reconstruction will be greatly needed in post-Taliban Afghanistan.

Could the Secretary of State for Asia-Pacific share with the House the significance of a two day conference taking place in Ottawa today?

Afghanistan
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Winnipeg North—St. Paul
Manitoba

Liberal

Rey D. Pagtakhan Secretary of State (Asia-Pacific)

Mr. Speaker, the member is right. The significance of this particular conference is enormous for the Afghan people and for humanity itself.

The Afghanistan Tomorrow conference, which I had the privilege of launching this morning, is aimed at developing a better understanding for Canada of the religious, social, economic and political dimensions in Afghanistan from the Afghan point of view by engaging relevant experts, as well, by developing the NGOs and the Canadian government strategies to develop alternatives for the reconstruction of Afghanistan.

Housing
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, today municipalities across the country joined thousands of people in more than 20 communities in a national day of action on Canada's urgent housing needs.

There is a desperate call from the FCM and from housing groups as yet another winter approaches because it is clear that the funds being considered by the federal government for housing are not good enough. They are not even an adequate downpayment. It is time for a fully funded national housing strategy.

Will the minister commit to this or will he fail homeless Canadians again?

Housing
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel
Québec

Liberal

Alfonso Gagliano Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to confirm that we are honouring our commitment in the red book and the Speech from the Throne. I have already had a meeting with my colleagues, the provincial and territorial ministers of housing. I will be having another meeting on November 30, a week from now. I am very confident that we will have an national affordable housing policy in this country very soon.

Revenue Canada
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Wendy Lill Dartmouth, NS

Mr. Speaker, 90,000 Canadians have recently received letters from Revenue Canada telling them to reapply for the disability tax credit. It could cost between $30 and $120 to get a doctor to agree that they are still legally blind or still have Down's syndrome. This is harassment.

First the CPP disability program is made more restrictive and now the disability tax credit is under fire. Why is the government picking on our most vulnerable citizens? Will it order these harassing letters to be withdrawn? Will it offer these 90,000 Canadians a written apology? Will it commit to real consultation with disability groups on all tax issues?

Revenue Canada
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway
B.C.

Liberal

Sophia Leung Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, the government has always had the best of intentions for the disabled. We will certainly review the situation. In the meantime, we have a special sympathy and empathy for disabled groups.

Justice
Oral Question Period

November 22nd, 2001 / 2:45 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, being wrongfully listed or wrongfully accused can cause irreparable harm to a person. Just ask Mohamed Attiah who, without a charge or even accusation, was fired from his job at the Chalk River atomic energy facility after being wrongfully accused of being involved in terrorist activities. This happened two months ago and there has been no explanation from the police or the nuclear agency that fired him. He has now launched a $5.5 million lawsuit.

The minister has advised us that under the new bill, individuals can go to the federal court if they are denied access to information.

Could the parliamentary secretary tell us what other recourse exists for those who are wrongfully listed--