House of Commons Hansard #113 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was countries.

Topics

Doris Anderson
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, today I honour the remarkable occasion of the 80th birthday of Doris Anderson, a true feminist, role model and friend.

Doris has always been a shining example of how age has very little to do with the date of one's birth. She has forever been ahead of us in her ideas. As editor of Chatelaine Doris brought previously private issues like domestic violence to the public sphere. In many ways she changed both Canadian journalism and the politics of gender. In so doing she has affected the lives of all Canadians.

As president of the Canadian Advisory Council on the Status of Women she helped enshrine equal rights for men and women in the Canadian constitution. She is still hard at work as chair of the Ontario Press Council and as a powerful advocate for proportional representation in federal elections.

Tonight there will be a sold out birthday celebration for Doris in Toronto where Governor General Adrienne Clarkson will speak and CBC's Shelagh Rogers will be the emcee. Her birthday present will be the Doris Anderson Ontario Graduate Scholarship in Women's Studies at York University.

Recipients will be given $5,000 from the scholarship fund and $10,000 as a double matching grant from the province of Ontario. Donations are still being accepted and additional money raised will go to the Doris Anderson Bursary Fund for $15,000 scholarships for out of province students and for research.

I am pleased to congratulate Doris on her continuing contributions and wish her the very best as she turns 80. She continues to teach us all so much.

Information and Communications Technologies
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Stéphane Bergeron Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, this week we celebrate Information and Communications Technologies Week.

For the past two decades, we have been witnessing the rapid development of a new technological field, computer science, which has completely revolutionized our ways of doing things and our perception of the world.

Whether or not we are familiar with these new tools, we have to recognize that they are now playing a major role in our daily lives, both at work and at home.

In this regard, we must praise the various governments for recognizing early the importance of information and communications technologies for the economic, social and human development of our communities.

The prosperity of a nation is now closely related to its quick adjusting to the so-called “new economy”, which is an economic order built around the development and use of new technologies.

I want to mention the Quebec government initiative to promote access to information and communications technologies for less fortunate families. This program allowed 217,500 low income families in Quebec to buy or rent a computer. Moreover, close to 286,000 additional households in Quebec can now surf the Internet.

So, the Quebec model should once again serve as an example to provide equal opportunities for all.

Remembrance Day
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

John Cannis Scarborough Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, there is no better time to stand with pride to pay tribute to all the great men and women who served our country with distinction and yes, even those who continue to serve us with pride today.

Remembrance Day is a time to honour our Canadian veterans whose supreme sacrifice permits us to live today in a free and democratic society.

Already hundreds of commemorative activities have taken place in communities across our country. From memorial services to story telling, Canadians are recognizing, remembering and thanking those who dedicated their lives to the pursuit of freedom and democracy over tyranny.

As we pause to salute our veterans I ask all Canadians to say a prayer for our Canadian forces who are serving here and abroad and to offer our blessings to their families during this most difficult time. I would also say to all Canadians, but especially to our youth, that we must never forget.

Zimbabwe
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, Zimbabwe is poised to descend into a bloodbath. President Mugabe says he is trying to redistribute land from wealthy white landowners to the poor black majority. This is simply not the case. Land reforms are a smokescreen so that Mr. Mugabe can terrorize his population and get re-elected.

I just returned from Zimbabwe where black farm workers have been beaten, brutalized and sometimes murdered by Mr. Mugabe's thugs. Their homes have been burned, their wives have been raped and they face starvation. Until this brutality ends Canada and the international community must suspend Zimbabwe from the Commonwealth, freeze the personal assets of Mr. Mugabe and his government members, and implement an arms embargo on Zimbabwe.

Until the rule of law is implemented, all illegal farm occupants are removed and election monitors are on the ground these sanctions should not be lifted. Unless we do this thousands of people are poised to be slaughtered in the months coming up to their next election. We must act now.

Malak Karsh
Statements By Members

November 9th, 2001 / 11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday I had the opportunity of attending a ceremony at the National Military Cemetery in Beechwood Cemetery. We were planting tulip bulbs and commemorating veterans.

Tulips and the tulip festival have become powerful symbols of Ottawa mostly due to Malak Karsh, a gentleman who died yesterday.

Mr. Karsh arrived in Canada in 1937 and from that day on essentially has shown us through his art and through his photography, the beauty of our environment, the beauty of our nature and the beauty of Canada's national capital region.

Mr. Karsh was a gentleman who lived among us as a peer. He was involved and was a great contributor to our society. He has shown us how to appreciate nature. He will be missed but will also be remembered fondly by all of us in Ottawa. On behalf of the citizens of Ottawa I pay homage to this great gentleman.

Human Rights
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, on September 21 the House unanimously passed a motion presented by the leader of the NDP to speak out against intolerance and hatred directed at Muslims and Arabs and to reassert our country's fundamental adherence to the rule of law and to preserving and protecting our human rights as outlined in the charter.

Yet the government has not acted to protect people. Hate crimes continue. Racial profiling continues and Canadian Arabs, Muslims and all visible minorities feel under attack.

The situation of Mohamed Attiah who worked at Atomic Energy of Canada is a graphic example of racial profiling and a poisonous environment of guilt by suspicion.

Mr. Attiah has filed a complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission and a lawsuit as a result of being let go from his employment after being questioned by the RCMP and security forces. Is this what we call tolerance and respect for people's rights?

I call on the government to adopt the NDP's action plan to stop the targeting of visible minorities and to be clear that what happened to Mr. Attiah is unacceptable and wrong.

Management of Nuclear Waste
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Serge Cardin Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, many years ago in Quebec, there was a popular song about a doll that said no.

This was pretty much what happened yesterday in the initial hours of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs, Northern Development and Natural Resources as the Liberals kept saying no to amendments from the Bloc Quebecois and the opposition.

The indifference of the Liberals was striking when we put forward our suggestions to improve Bill C-27 on the management of nuclear waste.

Repeatedly, they rejected the creation of a board of directors representative of the local community, including the aboriginal community, in order to ensure public confidence and add some credibility to the bill, which needs it.

They said no to blocking the import of nuclear waste from other countries, no to including an environmental clause, and no to referring the recommendations of the new waste management organization to the House of Commons.

The Bloc Quebecois has interesting proposals to make and the public has a right to know what they are. The Liberal puppets with their “no, no, no, no, no, no” will not stop us.

The Sikh Religion
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Bramalea—Gore—Malton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Wednesday a respected Canadian businessman, Surjit Babra, chairman and CEO of Skylink, was forced to remove his turban at La Guardia Airport in America, allegedly as part of a security inspection.

In Canada, we have learned to respect religious symbols. The fact that the RCMP changed its rules to allow Sikhs to wear their turbans while on duty is just one of many examples.

While understanding and sharing the terrible circumstances that have led to this point, I would urge our neighbour to the south to train and educate security personnel so that they will respect the right of people of the Sikh religion to wear turbans and not subject them to this undignified and unnecessary procedure.

Lobster Fishery
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gerald Keddy South Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, there are serious concerns throughout the Nova Scotia lobster fishery that the minister of fisheries is losing touch with industry.

Fishermen and buyers in lobster fishing area 33 and lobster fishing area 34 are fearful that DFO intends to move to a minimum carapace length of three and a half inches in an attempt to increase egg production. This potential carapace length increase to three and a half inches could cause loss of market share to Nova Scotian exporters.

Does the minister of fisheries realize that this increase could result in an oversupply of larger lobster and a complete loss of the one pound to one and one-third pound export market?

Fisherman and buyers want to be part of a solution to increase lobster egg production. They want to be informed and involved. They do not want to be victims of misguided DFO policy. The minister must commit to working with industry.

Bloc Quebecois
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, the news is bad for sovereignists. Quebecers are sick of hearing about the sovereignty of Quebec. The recent polls confirm it.

The Léger Marketing- Le Devoir-The Globe and Mail poll shows that support for sovereignty has dropped to 40.9%. The CRIC poll places it at 39%. Furthermore, 54% of Quebecers feel that sovereignty has had its day. And three out of five persons polled are no longer interested in a referendum between now and 2005, which is what the BQ and the PQ would like.

The Bloc Quebecois was formed to promote the sovereignist option federally. It would appear that their plan has failed.

For the well-being of Quebec, I urge Bloc Quebecois members to stop and think. They must realize that the time has come to put an end to this temporary party.

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Canadian Alliance

Stockwell Day Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, every time there is a crisis in the country the Liberals are exposed as having no policy, no plan and only responding in panic. We have seen that in the softwood lumber issue. We have seen it in terms of national defence where the resources are not there for our courageous troops. We see it in the airline industry problem.

I would like a specific yes or no answer from the Minister of Transport. Yesterday when he stood in the House and assured us that the airline industry and specifically Canada 3000 was fine and on schedule, he said that specifically, did he know yesterday at two o'clock in the afternoon that Canada 3000 was on the verge of shutting down?

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we are all concerned about the announcement that was made to cease operations of Canada 3000. This is indeed a blow to many Canadians, not only to the travelling public but the employees and I think everyone, including the Leader of the Opposition who should have led off with his questions by exhibiting some degree of sympathy for what the airline industry is going through.

The answer to the specific question is that yesterday when I stood here in the House I gave the answer I did, which was the accurate answer at the time.

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Canadian Alliance

Stockwell Day Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, unbelievable: yesterday he gave the answer he did. That took rocket science to figure out that response.

I am asking the question specifically. Yesterday at 2 p.m. as this minister was assuring Canadians that everything was fine in the airline industry he specifically commented about Canada 3000 on schedule, on time. Did he know at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon that Canada 3000 was on the verge of shutting down, yes or no?

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, that decision to shut down was taken last evening by the board of directors and was made official at midnight. Therefore, of course I did not know at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Canadian Alliance

Stockwell Day Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, there is a problem of confidence in the airlines among consumers. Personally I find that security is greater than ever and that is why I do have confidence flying, but many people are not flying because they do not see the government stepping up to the plate with increased training, with increased technology and with a commitment to air marshals. We do not see any commitment on any of this.

When will the government table the legislation that shows it will deal with these matters and that it will deal with the question of who is going to be funding the extra security? How much longer do we have to wait?