House of Commons Hansard #113 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was countries.

Topics

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Lorne Nystrom Regina—Qu'Appelle, SK

Mr. Speaker, let us put a human face on this. Yesterday the minister was advising and encouraging people to buy tickets on Canada 3000.

What does he have to say to those people who followed his advice and bought tickets on Canada 3000? What does he have to say to people who are stranded all over the world because the airline went under? What does he have to say to thousands of workers who have lost their jobs? Can he tell us what he is going to tell those people who have been following his advice?

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member made a false assertion. I did not state that yesterday. I stated that the company had informed me it would continue to operate. It looked at the situation last night and decided it could not continue. Therefore it chose to shut down overnight.

I do not mind defending the government's policy and dealing with the facts, but let us not have wrong assertions on the part of the opposition.

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Chuck Strahl Fraser Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, the problem is that there is no policy that anybody can understand other than to let the airlines all go broke.

The Minister of Transport has acknowledged since he was first appointed that restructuring in the airline industry was inevitable. This is not new. It has been evolving for years, yet the minister has done nothing to ensure that it takes place in an orderly fashion. While he has been in charge six airlines in this country have gone belly up.

Since the minister did not and does not have a plan for the airlines' restructuring, when will he table a plan for recovery, or is it just to let them all go broke?

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, it is nice to stand in the House and play these partisan games while people are hurting and while travellers are stuck in places they do not want to be.

I will remind the hon. member from the fifth party that, when he was with the Alliance or Reform or the opposition, he supported Bill C-26 and he supported the current policy, and I would hope that he would have the guts to stand up and continue to support it.

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Bill Casey Cumberland—Colchester, NS

Mr. Speaker, the minister refers to partisan games, but just days ago I saw him on television huffing and puffing and boasting that the government did not extend loan guarantees to Canada 3000. Therefore the government has no risk. What he did not say was the plan put Canadian passengers, creditors and thousands of employees at risk.

The airline industry was in chaos long before September 11. Will the minister now tell the House if he has plan to end the chaos in Canadian air transportation?

Airline Industry
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, implicit in the hon. member's question is that the Conservative Alliance, or DRC or whatever it is called, wants the government to hand over $75 million without the due diligence being done.

The government will look after taxpayer money. It has said the loan guarantee would only be forthcoming if certain conditions were met, and they have not been met at this point in time.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, this Liberal government has presided over the gutting of our military establishment since 1993. The Centre for Military and Strategic Studies said that the 1994 white paper is “outmoded and does not address the security challenges of our country today”.

My questions is simple. Will the Minister of National Defence engage in a thorough, sweeping and public review of our defence and security systems immediately?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, immediate attention is needed for fighting terrorism. That is what the Canadian forces and the government are doing.

Eventually, yes, everything needs to be reviewed, there is no doubt about it. However the government is keeping up with what is happening. We are ensuring that we have multi-purpose, combat capable forces. We have invested some $3 billion in the Canadian forces over the last three years.

We are not standing still. We are moving with the times. We are moving with the needs for safety and security of Canadians.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, that is the problem; there is no plan. It is all right to have money, but the strategic studies group has said that apart from having the money we have to know where the money will go and have a plan to address it. Again, this group and others have said very clearly that Canada needs a plan to address homeland security. There is no plan.

Will the Minister of National Defence, not later but now, do the right thing and start to implement a thorough review of our homeland security defences for all Canadians out there who need it?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member knows, the Prime Minister has established a committee of the cabinet that looks at security issues.

In the post-September 11 world we know the security environment has changed fundamentally and we have set about making changes. We have put $280 million into upgrades of many our systems. We brought in Bill C-36. There is more work that is still being done to ensure that we are responding to the needs of Canadians to ensure their safety and security and to ensure that we contribute to the anti-terrorism campaign internationally.

Anti-terrorism Act
Oral Question Period

November 9th, 2001 / 11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Réal Ménard Hochelaga—Maisonneuve, QC

Mr. Speaker, in the saga of the Young Offenders Act, the minister showed absolutely no openness to the legitimate demands of Quebec.

Within the framework of the anti-terrorism bill, is the minister going to be more receptive and bow to the arguments of the Privacy Commissioner, who is calling upon her to amend her bill so as to lessen its impact on the Privacy Act?

Could she at least sometimes heed what is said to her?

Anti-terrorism Act
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, it is always with great pleasure that I listen to the hon. member. Let me tell the hon. member, as I have said before in the House, that I know the concerns of the privacy commissioner. In fact, my officials and my deputy minister have been in discussions with the privacy commissioner and his officials. We hope that in working together in a constructive fashion, we will be able to deal with his concerns.

Anti-terrorism Act
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Réal Ménard Hochelaga—Maisonneuve, QC

Mr. Speaker, according to the commissioner, “We live in a country governed by the rule of law, not in a place where the authorities are endowed with unfettered power”.

Is the minister aware of this flaw in the anti-terrorism legislation and does she plan to show more openness by amending her bill accordingly?

We are asking this politely, in the interests of Quebec.

Anti-terrorism Act
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I have made it plain since we introduced Bill C-36. This is important legislation and that is why we want to hear what the Senate committee, which has reported, and the House committee, which continues its work, have to say.

However, on the specific point in relation to the privacy commissioner's concerns, we understand those concerns and my officials and his officials will continue to work to clarify the matter and hopefully reach a successful resolution.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Garry Breitkreuz Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration is in denial. She will not face the truth. A steady stream of immigration officials, retired and current, are frustrated with the minister and her mismanagement of the department. Today we found out from members of her own immigration refugee board that, and I quote, “If anybody thinks things are going to be done faster with the new system, they are dead wrong”.

These are honourable officials in the IRB with legitimate concerns, not opposition MPs or the media but people who care about their country. Why does the minister not fix what is obviously broke?