House of Commons Hansard #131 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was nuclear.

Topics

Terrorism
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, my hon. colleague is well aware, and I have said many times in the House, that for anyone involved in terrorism or who supports terrorism there is a mechanism in place in this country in order to make sure they are listed. That process will be followed.

Rough Diamond Trade
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Diane St-Jacques Shefford, QC

Mr. Speaker, the rough diamond trade fuels war in many parts of the world, including Sierra Leone, Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

By providing funding for rebel movements and terrorist organizations, rough diamonds put the security of many regions at risk and threaten the legitimate diamond trade.

Could the Minister of Foreign Affairs explain to the House what Canada is doing to put a stop to this illegal trade?

Rough Diamond Trade
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the government was ably represented by the member for Nepean--Carleton at the Kimberley process meeting in Botswana a few days ago.

Canada is an active participant in this process, because we believe that an international system is required for a diamond certification scheme. Diamonds are obviously a source of conflict, especially in Africa. We are trying, with other countries, to find a good way to certify them.

We will host the next meeting of the Kimberley process here in Canada.

Minister for International Cooperation
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Deborah Grey Edmonton North, AB

Mr. Speaker, there are three things in life that are certain. They would be death, taxes and knowing that the ethics counsellor will always vote in favour of the Liberals.

The CIDA minister is alleged to have voted illegally for her pal. I know it was “in good faith”, of course, but it is just ridiculous. She blames her staff for everything. She gets muzzled by her boss, although we did just see a brief cameo appearance, I will say. She will not produce the documents. She cannot remember when, where or how many times she voted in the last election.

Maybe I could just remind her of that thing called ministerial responsibility and ask her, because of it, why she will not resign right now.

Minister for International Cooperation
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, first the hon. member was slurring the minister in an unwarranted way. Then today she goes on to slur a respected senior public servant, the ethics counsellor. Is nothing beyond her in terms of the depths she is willing to fall to in order to hide and make people forget about the way she accepted her pension after all her conversations and commitments?

How about her apologizing? How about her resigning on the basis of the way she conducted herself over this pension issue?

Nuclear Disarmament
Oral Question Period

December 13th, 2001 / 3 p.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Today's decision by George Bush to scrap the 1972 ABM treaty is a body blow to nuclear disarmament which will lead to a new star wars missile defence program and to the militarization of space. The Canadian government has refused up to now to take a stand on NMD saying it is hypothetical.

Will the government now finally get off the fence and tell George Bush that Canadians oppose this dangerous reopening of the nuclear arms race? Will Canada condemn this decision to scrap the ABM treaty?

Nuclear Disarmament
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I think it is important to recognize that the ABM treaty is a bilateral agreement between the United States and the Russian federation, formerly the Soviet Union, and that the United States has acted within the terms of that treaty in giving six months' notice.

It is the hope of our government that during the process of the six months' notice period the parties will be able to agree on a new strategic framework which not only will include the basis for arms control and disarmament between them, but will also provide a verifiable and transparent system to supervise the reduction in offensive weapons that both parties have promised to initiate.

Points of Order
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, during the question period I referred to the matter of the Minister for International Cooperation voting twice. I may have appeared to have been talking about her allegedly voting twice in the federal election. What I was talking about was the issue of her allegedly voting twice during the last municipal election in Toronto, which took place during the federal election. I thought the House would appreciate this clarification.

Points of Order
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Joe Clark Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, that intervention by the Deputy Prime Minister was not clear to all ordinary Canadians. I wonder if he might get up and repeat it.

Points of Order
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

The Speaker

Certainly we will all have the chance to read it tomorrow in Hansard . Perhaps we will wait for that.

Points of Order
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Deborah Grey Edmonton North, AB

Mr. Speaker, on the same point of order, I was wondering if she was making a list and voting it twice. Maybe you could check on that one.

Points of Order
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Herb Gray Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, I do not know if the hon. member's question referred to her action three times in a row about taking her pension. She might want to have a clarification as well.

Points of Order
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

We might but I do not think we will.

Points of Order
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Greg Thompson New Brunswick Southwest, NB

Mr. Speaker, I need your help on this one. It is about resolving a difficulty which you know has been on the floor of the House for a number of weeks. I am not sure what can be done. It goes back to a statement made by the minister of HRDC in the House which has proven to be inaccurate.

I want to point out the difficulty this has created, not only for members on this side of the House but, in all generosity, for members on the other side of the House as well. It concerns a well established practice of HRDC to basically allow the early reporting of EI benefits so that EI cheques would not be held up during the holiday season. I am abbreviating this.

As you well know, Mr. Speaker, we all want to enjoy some kind of a Christmas. Usually that means putting groceries on the table, especially for those Canadians who are not working. Now--

Points of Order
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

If this is a point of order, the hon. member will have to abbreviate it further. I hope that he will get directly to the point of order. I have not heard anything yet that indicates a point of order here. He seems to be making a complaint, understandable but not permissible.