House of Commons Hansard #125 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-27.

Topics

Ways and Means
Government Orders

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

No.

Ways and Means
Government Orders

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

All those in favour of the motion will please say yea.

Ways and Means
Government Orders

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Yea.

Ways and Means
Government Orders

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

All those opposed will please say nay.

Ways and Means
Government Orders

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Nay.

Ways and Means
Government Orders

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

In my opinion the yeas have it.

And more than five members having risen:

Ways and Means
Government Orders

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Call in the members. Is it agreed that the members are in?

Ways and Means
Government Orders

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

(The House divided on the motion, which was agreed to on the following division:)

Ways and Means
Government Orders

3:15 p.m.

The Speaker

I declare the motion carried.

Privilege
Government Orders

December 5th, 2001 / 3:15 p.m.

The Speaker

I am now ready to rule on the question of privilege raised by the hon. member for Port Moody--Coquitlam--Port Coquitlam on Thursday, November 22, regarding Bill C-42, an act to amend certain acts of Canada, and to enact measures for implementing the biological and toxin weapons convention in order to enhance public safety, introduced earlier that day.

First, I would like to thank the hon. member for raising this matter as well as the hon. government House leader for his contribution.

In his submission, the hon. member for Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam alleges that the contents of Bill C-42 were leaked to the media before it was introduced at first reading in the House. As proof, he mentioned two newspaper articles, which appeared on Thursday, November 22, 2001, the first in the Globe and Mail and the second in the National Post .

I have examined the articles in question and can find no clear evidence that a leak actually occurred. The articles make reference to a number of sources, all unnamed, and include both speculations about the bill as well as assertions about its contents. Nowhere is any source, governmental or non-governmental, quoted with respect to the confidential contents of the bill.

On reading the text of these articles it is not possible for the Chair to distinguish between information, if any, that was directly communicated to the authors and material that is merely speculation or inference on the part of the authors for there seems to be no lack of ancillary material on which to base such speculations.

The hon. government House leader, for instance, noted that the very title of the bill, namely an act to amend certain acts of Canada, and to enact measures for implementing the biological and toxin weapons convention in order to enhance public safety, provides an important clue.

Intrepid journalists ready to invest the time to research the text of the biological and toxin weapons convention itself, not to mention the ongoing work of the international conference now reviewing its provisions, can expect to reap tangible benefits since Bill C-42 is the enabling legislation for Canada's ratification of that convention.

The mere fact that those speculations or inferences accord with the contents of the bill does not by itself constitute a prima facie breach of privilege.

Under these circumstances it is by no means evident to the Chair, based on the evidence submitted by the hon. member, that any actual disclosure of Bill C-42 has taken place prior to its introduction in the House. In the absence of such evidence, the Chair can find no basis for a question of privilege. I thank all hon. members for their attention to this matter.

Government Response to Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to four petitions.

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Bonavista—Trinity—Conception
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Brian Tobin for the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-46, an act to amend the Criminal Code (alcohol ignition interlock device programs)

(Motion deemed adopted)

Criminal Code
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson for the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

moved that the bill be read the first time and printed.

(Motion agreed to, bill read the first time and printed)

Interparliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

John Maloney Erie—Lincoln, ON

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34 I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, the report from the Canadian branch of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association concerning the 13th seminar of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association which was held in Tasmania from October 15 to October 21, 2001.

Interparliamentary Delegations
Routine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Parkdale—High Park
Ontario

Liberal

Sarmite Bulte Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34 I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, the report from the Canadian branch of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association concerning the 24th Canadian regional seminar of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association which was held in Regina, Saskatchewan from October 18 to October 21, 2001.