House of Commons Hansard #67 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was offenders.

Topics

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, it has been said time and time again that we will not fly these helicopters unless they are safe to fly.

In fact, the hon. member continually uses outdated information. The up to date information is that we are investing an additional $50 million in the Sea King helicopter to make sure that it will remain safe to fly and can complete its duties until the new helicopters arrive.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Peter Goldring Edmonton Centre-East, AB

Mr. Speaker, Canada's government has the dubious distinction of continuing the worst procurement circus in history.

After 25 years of studying, haggling and indecision the government is prepared to replace the 40 year old Sea Kings with craft whose range in a straight line is 20 nautical miles short of Canada's 200 mile maritime boundary and 50 nautical miles short of the Sea King's range.

Why does the government want replacements that fall 50 critical life saving miles short of the 40 year old Sea Kings?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, let me make it very clear that the requirements for this helicopter were written by the military. They were changed in no way by the government. We are seeking a helicopter that in fact meets the very requirements of today.

What the hon. member is talking about is old, cold war requirements. What we are talking about is what we need for today and the future. It is military requirements and no political changes were made to the statement of requirements.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

May 29th, 2001 / 2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister claims that the criminal youth justice system proposed by his government will allow Quebec to continue to promote the rehabilitation of young offenders.

If the Prime Minister is telling the truth and if the new federal criminal system does not jeopardize Quebec's success with rehabilitation, why does the government not put in black and white in the legislation that Quebec will be able to continue to apply the existing act?

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as I have said many times in the House, one of the principles on which our new youth justice legislation is based is flexibility.

I have said over and over again that they will be able to continue, enhance and build upon those policies and programs in Quebec. On top of that we will provide them with more resources to do it.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, this is not true. All the experts in Quebec, all the stakeholders say so.

Right now, as soon as a young person commits a first minor offence, we determine the most appropriate measure for rehabilitation purposes. From now on, this will no longer be possible. The new legislation includes automatic sentences and it ignores the specific needs of young offenders. The flexibility will no longer be there.

Can the minister understand this? All the stakeholders say that the proposed legislation is too strict. Why does she not specify in the act that Quebec will be allowed to maintain the current act? Just that. Then things would be clear.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, let me say again that I think some of that which the leader of the Bloc has said is a misrepresentation of that which appears in the youth criminal justice legislation.

One of the guiding principles of our new legislation is the particular circumstances in which the young person finds himself or herself.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Bellehumeur Berthier—Montcalm, QC

Mr. Speaker, with this bill, the minister is introducing into the youth justice system the calculation of provisional detention and the whole matter of conditional supervision, principles that are already in the adult system but are not currently part of the young offender system.

Does the minister realize that this new method of calculating provisional detention, and the fact that a young offender serves only two thirds of his sentence as an adult, is going to have a direct impact and to prevent the specialists from intervening properly and from providing young offenders with the rehabilitation they so greatly need?

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, let me reassure the House that there is no provision for parole in the new youth justice legislation.

However, if that which the hon. member is complaining about is the fact that young people after serving all or some part of their sentence receive supervision in the community, I can only say that I profoundly disagree with the hon. member. I think that is a positive thing and will help with the quick reintegration of young offenders back into society.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Bellehumeur Berthier—Montcalm, QC

There is another example, Mr. Speaker. With the minister's bill, a 14 year old, regardless of any provincial order in council, will be tried as an adult for certain designated crimes, under adult rules and before a judge who usually tries adults.

Does the minister realize that the new rules will prevent the Quebec system from delivering the right measures at the right time to this young offender, and thus will bring about the failure of the rehabilitative approach used in Quebec?

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Edmonton West
Alberta

Liberal

Anne McLellan Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I presume the hon. member knows that under the existing Young Offenders Act, of which they speak so much, it is possible to seek transfer of a 14 year old to adult court. In the province of Quebec they transfer more young people to adult court than almost any other province.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Bellehumeur Berthier—Montcalm, QC

Not at age 14.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

Young Offenders
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please, otherwise it will be impossible to hear the hon. member for Halifax ask her question.

The hon. member for Halifax has the floor and we will hear her question. I urge hon. members to show some restraint.

Nuclear Industry
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Alexa McDonough Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, the G-8 has resolved to help Russia get rid of 34 tonnes of weapons grade plutonium. That can be a good thing, but the current proposal for accomplishing it involves transporting this hazardous plutonium 4,000 kilometres across Russia and burning it in fast breeder reactors which create more plutonium.

The German government is so concerned about these hazards that it has said no to exporting the technology. I would like to ask the Prime Minister what is Canada's position on this controversial matter.