House of Commons Hansard #15 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was lobbyists.

Topics

Journées québécoises de la solidarité internationale
Statement by Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, for the past six years in Quebec the Journées québécoises de la solidarité internationale have offered an unparalleled opportunity for collective reflection on the meaning of international solidarity and its underlying values, namely the right of the six billion inhabitants of Planet Earth to justice, equity and dignity.

The shock wave from September 11 continues to make us aware of the fragility of democracy. This year's theme, choices for a just peace, is intended as an appeal to all of us to assume responsibility.

Only our unflagging commitment will ensure the implementation of a civilized globalization in which the world's wealth is shared equally and there is true social justice.

Only an acute awareness of the precarious nature of our environmental resources will reduce the huge risks of armed conflict over the control of water, land, fossil fuels and mineral resources.

Together we can counteract these cycles of violence and terror, thereby contributing to the implementation and maintenance of fundamental rights throughout the global village.

National Dystonia Awareness Week
Statement by Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Judi Longfield Whitby—Ajax, ON

Mr. Speaker, dystonia is a neurological disorder that causes powerful and involuntary muscle spasms which may affect as many as 300,000 to 500,000 people across North America. Unfortunately, most of the public knows little about dystonia and victims often go for long periods of time without seeking medical assistance because they are unaware of the disorder.

However there are organizations, such as the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation, that are working hard to discover the cause of the disorder and to eventually find a cure. In addition, there are groups of volunteers in communities across the country that are working hard to promote a greater awareness of this disorder.

I would like to extend my appreciation and gratitude to all those dedicated to creating a better understanding of the disorder and to acknowledge National Dystonia Awareness Week during the month of October.

Political Anniversaries
Statement by Members

11:05 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Val Meredith South Surrey—White Rock—Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, this week is the anniversary of two significant events that have had a major impact on Canadian politics.

Fifteen years ago I was one of 262 delegates who founded the Reform Party of Canada in Winnipeg. From this small group and through the hard work of countless dedicated volunteers, we were able to become the official opposition in less than 10 years, a significant accomplishment.

While there have been some bumps along the way of our evolution to the Canadian Alliance, our influence has been undeniable. We have forced a Liberal government to do the unimaginable: balance the budget and maintain a surplus for five years. Now we even hear that the leading contender for the Liberal leadership is espousing our long time policies of democratic and parliamentary reform.

The second major event is the ninth anniversary for the large group of members of the House who were first elected in 1993. I think we would all agree that it has been one heck of a ride.

Sylvie Fréchette
Statement by Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Yolande Thibeault Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, October is Women's History Month. This year's theme is “Women and Sports--Champions Forever!”.

I would like to take advantage of this opportunity to draw attention to the accomplishments of Sylvie Fréchette. This synchronized swimmer, a native of Montreal, is a true Olympian, and a glowing example of the strength and drive of which human beings are capable. She has inspired many Canadians with her determination, grace, and ability to overcome obstacles.

In December 1993, she was at last presented with her richly deserved gold medal, 16 months after the Barcelona games, where a controversy arose over a judge's error. At the next Olympics in Atlanta in 1996, she was one of the members of the team that won silver.

In addition to her competitive victories, Sylvie has received numerous awards in recognition of her contribution to sport in Canada. She was named Quebec woman athlete of the year in 1992 and 1993. Synchro Canada created an award in her honour, and in 1999 she became a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame—

Sylvie Fréchette
Statement by Members

11:05 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Dartmouth.

Persons with Disabilities
Statement by Members

October 25th, 2002 / 11:05 a.m.

NDP

Wendy Lill Dartmouth, NS

Mr. Speaker, today I rise to speak on behalf of Canadians with disabilities.

Last year the CCRA demanded that over 100,000 Canadians reapply for the disability tax credit even though for most, nothing about their disability had changed. Limbs had not suddenly grown back and genetic disorders had not suddenly disappeared. Tens of thousands of Canadians have lost this valuable tax credit simply because they were unable to fill out the complex forms properly.

On top of that, the finance minister has proposed changes to make it even more difficult to get this already small tax credit. Considering that many people with disabilities already live in poverty, this is truly astounding.

Because of this, the NDP has launched a nationwide letter writing campaign to the Prime Minister, asking him to withdraw the proposed amendments and to have effective consultation before making any further changes.

I call on the government to show compassion to the vulnerable people in our society, instead of taking away what very little they have.

Women and Sports
Statement by Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Suzanne Tremblay Rimouski-Neigette-Et-La Mitis, QC

Mr. Speaker, this year, Women's History Month is dedicated to the physical and sporting activities of women and girls. This year's theme, Women and Sports--Champions Forever!, pays tribute to women who have reached the heights of victory.

During the 2nd Olympics in 1900, women were integrated into the Olympic Games. Since then, women have distinguished themselves in the sporting arena. Women like Sylvie Fréchette, gold medallist in synchronized swimming, Manon Rhéaume, the first woman to play in the National Hockey League, Chantal Benoît, gold medallist in wheelchair basketball, are among the Quebeckers who have shone in recent years.

The Bloc Quebecois wished to thank all women who have participated in games of the Olympiad since the beginning and highlight the determination and courage of these champions, who, thanks to their tenacity and their accomplishments, have become examples for society.

Claire Macaulay
Statement by Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, education has always been a fundamental Canadian value.

The strength of education depends on the dedication of the teaching body that shapes our youth. I would like to pay tribute to the principal of Mont-Bleu primary school in Hull, Claire Macaulay.

Through her courage and dedication, Ms. Macaulay established the first international studies program at the primary level in the Commission scolaire Des-Portages-de-l'Outaouais. Exceptionally generous and dedicated, Ms. Macaulay has established this program that encourages Canadian culture and invites students to discover the outside world as well. Ms. Macaulay and her students have taken part in a number of projects, including digging wells in India, three of which have been named for Mont-Bleu school. They carried out a project to distribute school supplies for children in Mali and in Benin and another to open a library in a Benin refugee camp.

Hats off to Ms. Macaulay and bravo to Mont-Bleu school in Hull.

Kyoto Protocol
Statement by Members

11:10 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Inky Mark Dauphin—Swan River, MB

Mr. Speaker, the Gary Doer Government of Manitoba wants the federal government to ratify the Kyoto agreement in haste. Unfortunately, Manitobans have not been consulted by the Doer government on this issue. There are many questions that need to be answered by the Manitoba NDP government.

Premier Doer, how will ratifying Kyoto benefit all Manitobans? What will be the costs to Manitobans in terms of jobs and economic benefits? How will Kyoto cost individual Manitobans living in Manitoba? Premier Doer, when will Manitobans be consulted on a province-wide basis in a transparent process?

Manitobans are too smart to be led by the Doer government's blind faith approach to supporting Kyoto.

Annual Flu Awareness Campaign
Statement by Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Jeannot Castonguay Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the House and all Canadians that the 2002 Flu Awareness Campaign was conducted in September.

Every winter, almost 25% of Canadians are infected with influenza. Thousands become seriously ill, and thousands die from flu related complications.

Most people who want to improve their chances of having a flu free winter can benefit from the annual flu shot. The flu shot cannot give a person the flu, and side effects are minor.

At high risk are seniors, adults and children with chronic diseases, and their caregivers. WIthout vaccination, they may face the possibility of serious or even fatal consequences, should they get the flu. A yearly vaccination is the only preventive measure that has been proven to reduce mortality rate from influenza.

I encourage all Canadians at risk to protect themselves and others. Vaccination is the most effective way to prevent flu infection.

Thank you, and do not forget your shot.

Grain Transportation
Statement by Members

11:10 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jim Gouk Kootenay—Boundary—Okanagan, BC

Mr. Speaker, as prairie farmers try to salvage their crops they are faced with a lockout at the grain loading facilities in Vancouver.

The Minister of Labour claims that we have to allow the collective bargaining process to work, but this completely ignores the fact that it is not working. Grain handlers have been without a contract since December 2000 and have been locked out by the employer since August.

Substituting final offer arbitration as a dispute settlement mechanism in place of a lockout or strike does not cancel further negotiations. It does not impose a settlement and it does not rule out any other non-disruptive method of settling the contract. It simply provides a specific settlement mechanism if no other agreement can be reached.

For the government to do nothing until grievous harm has occurred and then impose a settlement, as it has in the past, is doubly irresponsible. The harm cannot be undone and the imposition of a settlement is unfair to the labour participants.

I hope the minister will protect farmers, grain workers and all people affected by the current impasse by acting responsibly in imposing a non-disruptive settlement mechanism that will not interfere with the provisions of collective bargaining.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

John Reynolds West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast, BC

Mr. Speaker, six out of ten provinces are on record as opposing the Kyoto accord. That number will grow as it becomes clear how ruinous this scheme will be to their economies.

There was a time when the Liberals boasted that they were a national consensus party. That was forgotten in 1993 when consensus building was seen as less efficient and more time consuming than prime ministerial rule.

My question is for the Prime Minister. How can he justify proceeding with this ill-conceived and economically dangerous accord when 60% of the provinces are opposed to it?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member's preamble to the question is not correct.

The fact is that we are striving to get cooperation with all the provinces and territories. The hon. member fails to point out that 14 first ministers, every first minister in the country, in 1997 after the Kyoto agreement instructed their ministers of environment and their ministers of energy to work together to come up with an implementation plan.

These are facts which he conveniently ignores in coming to the inaccurate conclusion that he does.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

John Reynolds West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast, BC

Mr. Speaker, that is quite interesting. Yes, they wanted to do it but after two years of the government messing up they got nowhere and they want to cancel it.

The Premier of Ontario says that the Prime Minister has no intention of implementing Kyoto because he knows it is unworkable and would throw hundreds of thousands of Canadians onto the unemployment lines. That is the Premier of Ontario saying that today and he has seen the two year plan. All we got yesterday were gross generalities and nothing in terms of what the real true economic impacts will be. Instead of blowing smoke in the faces of Canadians, when will the government release the true cost estimates of Kyoto?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the document we tabled yesterday does in fact indicate what the economic effects are of implementing the Kyoto protocol, as prepared through the modelling we have done. Of course we say, quite correctly I think, that we cannot anticipate every cost because we do not know the interest rates in the future and we do not know other factors in the economy in the future.

As far as we can, we have the best figures that are available and we have done that in cooperation with the private sector.