House of Commons Hansard #20 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was treaties.

Topics

Government Spending
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dick Harris Prince George—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, no matter how we cut it, it is another $5 billion up in smoke. While the minister continues to blow smoke with his $5 billion spending program, Canadians are kind of concerned about things like health care, the state of our military and the quality of life for our seniors.

Instead of blowing smoke, when will the government's spending programs reflect the real priorities of Canadians? When will that start?

Government Spending
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, what about affordable housing? I think all members of Parliament are for the fact that we should improve affordable housing and they will find us spending money on that.

What about disability pensions for veterans affairs people? Are they saying that we should not pay disability pensions to our people?

What about homelessness? Are they saying that we should not spend money for that big problem?

I think the opposition is completely wrong.

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, the list of Liberal scandals is getting longer and longer: the Auberge Grand-Mère, the sponsorship program, the resignations of the former Minister of National Defence, Solicitor General, and Minister of Public Works and Government Services. Now Democracy Watch has added to the list by establishing a direct link between the awarding of highly lucrative government contracts and the amounts contributed to the Liberal Party of Canada by the companies awarded those contracts.

Will the Deputy Prime Minister agree that it is high time to cast some light on this government's system of awarding contracts, by calling at last for an independent public inquiry?

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Minister of State and Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member opposite is no doubt aware, having listened to the excellent speech by the Prime Minister as I did, that he has said here in this House that, in addition to the rules on transparency already in place, there will be additional rules within the bill I myself will be introducing before the Holidays. These will address leadership races, the nomination process, limits on corporate donations and on those from the unions, of course. There will be a whole series of other rules to enhance transparency—

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. Member for Laval-Centre.

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Madeleine Dalphond-Guiral Laval Centre, QC

Mr. Speaker, we have been waiting ten years for some proof of transparency, and are still waiting. The government's handling of surpluses, its methods for awarding contracts, and its hesitancy about political party funding, are a clear indication of this.

Are we to understand that only those companies that are cozy with the Liberal Party of Canada will benefit shamelessly from the Prime Minister's largesse and that of his government?

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Liberal

Don Boudria Minister of State and Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I will repeat for the hon. member's benefit: the contributions are already public and the rules of transparency will be enhanced by the bill that is going to be introduced shortly. Finally, I might point out to her and her party that, when we reinforced the rules for third party transparency with Bill C-2, her party voted against it.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, developing countries are now saying that they have serious doubts about ever being part of the Kyoto protocol at any time in the future. Now developing countries are out. We have no clean energy credits. Eight out of ten provinces are opposing Kyoto. Industry is out. It seems everyone is out except the government. It is simply out to lunch on this issue.

When will the government agree to a made in Canada solution and give up on this flawed bureaucratic Kyoto protocol?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Kitchener Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Karen Redman Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I find it absolutely incredible that Canadians know what the Kyoto protocol is all about. Like so many international undertakings, the developing world will be the first phase, which is the period between 2008 and 2012. After that we will look at including developing countries.

We have an incredible opportunity for Canadians and Canadian technology to be on the cutting edge, to come up with technological advances that we can then export and help developing worlds deal with this very important issue. Canadians understand.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Gerry Ritz Battlefords—Lloydminster, SK

Mr. Speaker, the petroleum industry like any business requires a stable economic climate and long term planning. Thanks to the Liberals' continued bungling of the Kyoto accord, industry cannot count on anything but uncertainty. It has no idea what the government has planned other than imposing Kyoto on Canadians.

Husky Oil and Petro-Canada pulled back $5 billion of investment in western Canada. Will the government now consider a made in Canada approach or will it continue to force Kyoto and drive investment like this away?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Kitchener Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Karen Redman Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, clearly, we have said two things throughout this entire negotiation, which is well over five years in the making. We have said that no region will be disproportionately burdened nor will any sector be disproportionately burdened, which is why we continue to talk to industry and to our provincial counterparts.

I will point out to the hon. member opposite that Syncrude, for example, has reduced its emissions intensity by 22% since 1990 levels and aims to attain a 45% reduction. The industry understands what we are up to.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

November 1st, 2002 / 11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Nancy Karetak-Lindell Nunavut, NU

Mr. Speaker, we know that experiences in early years influence a child's development, affecting lifelong health, well-being and learning abilities.

While conditions are improving, the general health status of Canada's aboriginal population is still below the national average. Sadly, first nations and Inuit children have higher risks of infant mortality. There are higher risks of FAS and poor nutrition and too many babies are born with unhealthy birth weights.

In the last throne speech the government committed to enhance early child development programs for aboriginal children--

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. Secretary of State for Children and Youth.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Western Arctic
Northwest Territories

Liberal

Ethel Blondin-Andrew Secretary of State (Children and Youth)

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the House that the early childhood development strategy for first nations and other aboriginal children was launched yesterday at the Oneida of the Thames First Nation in Ontario in the presence of Chief Terry Doxtator of the Oneida, Chief Joe Miskokomon of the Chippewas and all their parents and children.

The strategy provides $320 million over five years to improve and expand early childhood development programs for aboriginal children by building on existing programs and services for first nations and other aboriginal children, including head start and programs addressing fetal alcohol syndrome.

Grain Transportation
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Bev Desjarlais Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, in the 1970s and 1980s the Canadian government bought a fleet of hopper cars which were then leased back to railroads to haul western grain. The government no longer wants the cars but a farmer rail car coalition is prepared to acquire and manage the fleet. The coalition is broadly based and it has a business plan ensuring that benefits will flow back to all western farmers.

Will the transport minister commit to turn these cars over to the farmer rail car coalition for the sum of $1?