House of Commons Hansard #41 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was plan.

Topics

Child Pornography
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

The Acting Speaker (Ms. Bakopanos)

The hon. member for Vancouver Kingsway.

Convention Centre
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Sophia Leung Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, on Wednesday, December 4, the Prime Minister and Premier Campbell of British Columbia announced $495 million for the expansion of a convention centre in Vancouver.

The convention centre is expected to generate over $1.5 billion in economic benefits to the industry, over 6,700 person years of employment during construction and 7,500 full time jobs throughout the province once the expanded facility is operational.

For many years the federal B.C. Liberal caucus worked closely with the Prime Minister and cabinet ministers to develop this much needed expansion to the convention centre. The agreement brought the three levels of government in British Columbia together to solve the need for a larger convention centre that will benefit all British Columbians.

Health Care
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, my constituents of Ottawa Centre, as well as Canadians, remain deeply attached to the core values found at the heart of health care and they want health care to remain a publicly funded and operated system that offers universal service to all Canadians.

Last week I received a call from one of my constituents who grew up in P.E.I. at the time when health care was provided on a private basis and based on a person's ability to pay. He reminded us that our society has already experienced private health care and that any return to the past would effectively end the principle of universal health care for all Canadians.

On behalf of Ottawa Centre, I thank the Prime Minister for taking this excellent initiative and adopting a long term view to preserving our health care system. I also congratulate Mr. Romanow for a job well done.

Radio Nord Communications
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Guy St-Julien Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik, QC

Madam Speaker, a labour dispute has been dragging on at Radio Nord Communications in Abitibi—Témiscamingue since October 25. As a result, the population there is being deprived of a source of information provided by real reporters.

This company is in a monopoly situation as far as regional television coverage is concerned, being affiliated with TVA, Radio-Canada and TQS.

The services provided by Radio Nord are deteriorating and this has a direct impact on the people living in communities far removed from major urban centres.

Radio Nord no longer has any reporters assigned to the Abitibi West region, or even in the Témiscamingue area.

Radio Nord is gradually disengaging from Abitibi—Témiscamingue by centralizing its operations in Gatineau.

Radio Nord has applied to the CRTC to reduce the length of its regional news broadcasts on each of its stations.

Both parties need to return to the bargaining table and reach a negotiated agreement.

Éduco-Pop des Bois-Francs in Victoriaville
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Assad Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, Éduco-Pop des Bois-Francs in Victoriaville will be receiving financial assistance between October 21, 2002 and March 2003 for its project Stratégie 2003.

In conjunction with the Commission scolaire des Chênes and two other school boards, this organization is working to improve the availability of literacy services in the central Quebec region.

Their intended approach is to develop an action plan in order to design communication tools and get all stakeholders in the region involved.

I wish them all the best in their undertaking.

Kyoto Protocol
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Monte Solberg Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, the former finance minister seems to have twisted himself into a knot once again on the Kyoto file. He has been for Kyoto, with conditions; he has been against Kyoto, with conditions; and now he is telling Premier Klein, “Trust me because I'll straighten it all out later when I win the Liberal leadership race”.

Why should anyone trust him? In the period of a few short weeks he has managed to betray both the pro and anti Kyoto forces. He said that we would never support Kyoto if it would create investment uncertainty, damage our economy or punish a single region. Kyoto has already done all those things and the contortionist former finance minister just watches with amusement and pats himself on the back with his own left foot. But then practising extreme yoga, turning oneself into knots, and being all things to all people is only difficult if one happens to have a spine, something that the member for LaSalle—Émard is missing.

Literacy
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Gérard Binet Frontenac—Mégantic, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure today to inform the House of two initiatives supported by the National Literacy Secretariat of Human Resources Development Canada in the riding of Lotbinière—L'Érable.

The organization ABC Lotbinière received $19,000 for a study on distance education using the Internet. The next stage will be to develop a distance education Internet site to enhance access to literacy services.

In Sainte-Sophie de Lévrad, the Centre d'action bénévole of the Bécancour RCM received $12,000 to develop a communication plan designed to raise public awareness of illiteracy.

It is through such community initiatives that the people of Lotbinière will be able to address the problems associated with illiteracy and build empowerment on a day to day basis.

École de médecine vétérinaire de Saint-Hyacinthe
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, today is the day when the dean of the École de médecine vétérinaire de Saint-Hyacinthe has to produce his report to meet the requirements of the American Veterinary Medical Association, confirming whether or not the funding is available to make the required improvements. The Government of Quebec did its share months ago, with a $41 million investment.

But the dean has received nothing from the federal government. He will have nothing to report because of the failure to act of this government, which is still refusing to fund the only French language veterinary college in North America.

Instead, the dean will have to announce to the college's 400 French-speaking students that the validity of their diplomas may be questioned and that this government would rather keep its billions to fund sponsorship programs exclusively designed to reward friends of the Liberal Party of Canada, or that the federal Liberal members from Quebec prefer to engage in petty partisan politics, rather than deal with issues that are fundamental to Quebec.

Ottawa has no money to spare for a jewel in the crown of education in Quebec and a vital part of our scientific heritage. Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Quebecois will not let the federal government sabotage this institution and, once again, weaken Quebec.

Middle East
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Bernard Patry Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, violence only leads to violence. All violence, no matter what kind or who perpetrates it, must be roundly condemned.

This is why, as a parliamentarian, I must speak out against and strongly condemn the remarks made by the leader of Hezbollah's political wing, Sheik Hassan Nasrallah. Last week, he called upon young Palestinians, encouraging them to become human bombs around the world.

This call for suicide bombers will only increase terrorism and the number of innocent victims worldwide. Furthermore, these senseless remarks will only delay negotiations to re-establish a dialogue aimed at finding a fair, equitable and lasting solution to the Middle East conflict.

For this reason, I am urging the Government of Canada to take direct action to intensify efforts to rapidly renew peace talks and ensure an end to all this needless violence.

Kyoto Protocol
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dale Johnston Wetaskiwin, AB

Mr. Speaker, today the Prime Minister confirmed his legacy. Was it a cure for Canada's ailing health care woes, a solution perhaps for the problems plaguing the firearms registry, or a bold initiative to bring about peace in the Middle East? No, it was none of these. It was the stifling of the free and open debate on the Kyoto accord.

Earlier today the Prime Minister closed off debate on this important issue. If used on occasion closure is a distasteful practice but this Prime Minister has taken this undemocratic tactic to a whole new level. Today, as a matter of fact, marks the 81st time that the Prime Minister has muzzled debate in the House, a total that would make even the previous record holder, Brian Mulroney, blush.

Through actions such as this there can be no doubt that the Prime Minister will go down in history as the most dictatorial and arrogant Prime Minister of all times. Now that is a legacy.

Michel Berthiaume and Allan Loney
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Serge Marcil Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to underscore the courage of two individuals in my riding of Beauharnois—Salaberry, Michel Berthiaume and Allan Loney, who received the Medal of Bravery today for an act of bravery under dangerous circumstances.

On September 10, 1999, they came to the rescue of a colleague who was seriously injured during an explosion at a chemical plant in Saint-Timothée, Quebec. Alerted by the sound of the explosion, they ran toward the victim, who, despite his injuries, had managed to escape the burning building. Despite the risk of collapse of the brick wall, next to which the victim was lying, and the shower of explosive debris, Messrs. Berthiaume and Loney carried the victim a distance from the building where hundreds of kilograms of explosive powder could have ignited at any moment. They then laid the man down in a van and administered first aid until help arrived.

Congratulations.

Health Care
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Bev Desjarlais Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, there is no end to the government's wasting of taxpayer dollars: the billion dollar boondoggle by HRDC, millions of untendered contracts to Groupaction, millions more to Attractions Canada to promote tourism when we already fund the Canadian Tourism Association, and now the 400% cost overruns of the gun registry.

Under the direction of the former finance minister from LaSalle—Émard, the Liberals slashed health care funding and cut EI benefits while raking in a $40 billion surplus.

The Liberal government pretends to care about Canadians while wasting dollars that could go to health care funding.

The Prime Minister has received the Romanow report. Canadians have spoken but is the government listening? Is the Liberal government promoting Romanow's recommendations? No, it is silent. Canadians wanting to review the report must pay $49 to get a copy.

Canadians want a publicly funded, publicly delivered system. Canadians agree that there should be accountability by the provinces but how can the Liberal government ensure that accountability when it misuses and abuses taxpayer dollars?

Government Contracts
Statements By Members

December 9th, 2002 / 2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Laurentides, QC

Mr. Speaker, this government has had too many scandals to count. On Saturday, we learned that certain Liberal cronies were awarded contracts of close to $150,000 to surf the Internet. Some devoted supporters of the Liberal party tried to convince us that they worked more than 10 hours a day for 365 days of the year, for the benefit of Canadians and Quebeckers. Others appear to have submitted somewhat padded bills as well.

However, it is unfortunate that the revelation of these scandals has depended on leaks, reports from the Auditor General and informed but usually anonymous sources.

Time passes, but the names remain: Gosselin, Everest, Groupaction, Lafleur, Polygone, Coffin. Unfortunately, while the players are the same, the sums of money involved continue to grow.

How long will it take to finally see the light at the end of the tunnel? How long will it take before we really find out the true extent of the damage? Will we have to rely on Groupaction to get the study done?

Human Rights
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, 54 years ago today, the United Nations adopted the genocide treaty, sometimes referred to as the never again treaty, to prevent and protect against this most unthinkable and unspeakable of crimes.

Regrettably, and incredibly, genocide became the paradigmatic form of armed conflict in the 1990s, including the advocacy and perpetration of genocide in the Balkans and Rwanda.

The enduring lesson of the Holocaust is that Nazism succeeded not only because of the industry of death but because of the ideology of hate. It was this teaching of contempt, this demonizing of the other, this is where it all began.

Fifty years later we have witnessed an appalling trafficking in state sanctioned hate, which led us down the road to the unthinkable, ethnic cleansing in the Balkans, the unspeakable, the preventable genocide in Rwanda, and the demonizing, once again, of the Jews.

What is needed at this point is a strategy of prevention, a culture of human rights in place of a culture of hate; a culture of respect in place of a culture of contempt, of respect for the inherent dignity of the human person, and the equal dignity of all persons everywhere.

Firearms Registry
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

John Herron Fundy Royal, NB

Mr. Speaker, last week the Auditor General said that the government misled Parliament by hiding an unprecedented $700 million.

The Liberal government's accounting has been a prodigy of slyness and concealment. The safe handling of firearms is needed. All Canadians support this, but a cost overrun of $700 million is not a break in procedure but a break and enter on the Canadian taxpayers.

We all know the program got off to a rocky start by the founding father who originally guesstimated the cost to be $2 million. Seven years later the cost is over 400 times that figure.

Next up we have the Minister of Health, another player in the firearms fiasco. I think all members are curious over the fact that these numbers were kept secret during an election year. How was it that justice officials were saying that the program would cost $300 million, then simultaneously asked for half a billion dollars in supplemental estimates?

Then we have the revisionist finance minister. He now says that the firearms registry needs to fixed. He fixed it all right, by approving supplemental estimates of half a billion dollars.

Why does the government not cut its losses for the taxpayers and scrap this bureaucratic billion dollar blunder?