House of Commons Hansard #148 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was competition.

Topics

Highway Infrastructure
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Kamouraska—Rivière-Du-Loup—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, again last week, there was a death in the Lower St. Lawrence following an accident on highway 185, the Trans-Canada, bringing to 90 the number of deaths in the past ten years. These are deaths that a four-lane highway would have prevented.

Since the government of Quebec has already begun investing in this highway, and since it has been the subject of promises by the federal Liberals, what is the Prime Minister waiting for to honour his ministers' and MPs' promises? When is he going to put the money on the table to end this carnage?

Highway Infrastructure
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, our programs in this regard are well known. We are currently negotiating a cost-sharing agreement for the projects approved with the provincial governments, including the government of Quebec.

If the government of Quebec feels that the stretch between Rivière-du-Loup and the New Brunswick border is a priority, I will be very pleased to agree. When I was a member from New Brunswick, I complained that there was no good highway between Quebec and New Brunswick.

Highway Infrastructure
Oral Question Period

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Robert Lanctôt Châteauguay, QC

Mr. Speaker, with respect to the Liberal promises about highway 30, an amount of $357 million was announced as official in the member for Beauharnois--Salaberry's advertising material during the election campaign.

The $108 million out of the total budget put on the table by the federal government is far from enough to cover even the bridges necessary to extend highway 30.

When is the federal government going to honour the promises made by the ministers and MPs and put on the table, as promised, the $357 million which was part of a firm commitment to complete highway 30, not just wishful thinking?

Highway Infrastructure
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Ottawa South
Ontario

Liberal

John Manley Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Infrastructure and Crown Corporations

Mr. Speaker, first of all, we have already said that the amounts in the strategic infrastructure fund could be used for highways as well. But with so much interest in highways across the way, I think that perhaps there will soon be a provincial election.

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Carol Skelton Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, the federal government's citizens first initiative rates the performance of federal departments from the perspective of people who use the system.

In the year 2000, unemployed Canadians gave Canada employment centres a failing grade. Forty-six out of 100 said they were very unhappy with the service.

Why is the government content with a failing grade in delivering services to the unemployed?

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the government has made and continues to make sure that we have an employment insurance program in place to make sure that any workers in this country who have difficulty are taken care of.

We have made and will continue to make sure that we have the proper programs, training and other things that are needed for unemployed people in this country.

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Carol Skelton Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, the government's stated goal is to increase the performance of federal departments by 10% by 2005. That means that a mere 60% of Canadians would be satisfied with the performance of Canada employment centres, a D-minus instead of an F.

Why is the government content with low targets and bottom rung service for unemployed Canadians?

Employment Insurance
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Solicitor General of Canada

The government has never said, Mr. Speaker, that there is not room for improvement. We are always striving to make sure that we provide what is needed for the people in this country.

There are objectives to meet and we will meet them.

Human Rights
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, in October 2001, an Islamic court in northern Nigeria sentenced Safiya Husseini to death by stoning for having sexual relations out of wedlock.

Last week a protest was held in Montreal to bring attention to this unacceptable violation of human rights.

Could the Secretary of State for Latin America and Africa tell the House what the Government of Canada is doing to prevent her execution?

Human Rights
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Brome—Missisquoi
Québec

Liberal

Denis Paradis Secretary of State (Latin America and Africa) (Francophonie)

Mr. Speaker, last week, I expressed Canada's concerns with respect to this execution.

On Thursday, I met with Nigeria's Minister of Information. I told him of our concerns. I gave him a copy of Hansard , showing the views expressed in the House, as well as a copy of the petition tabled by the member for Burnaby--Douglas. The Nigerian minister assured me that an appeal will be heard on March 18 and that Nigeria will honour its human rights obligations.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

February 25th, 2002 / 2:50 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Howard Hilstrom Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, the $240 billion farm bill currently before the U.S. congress will include subsidies for pulse crops. In order to harvest a cheque from the U.S. government, farmers south of the border will massively overproduce, killing the pulse industry in western Canada.

At the same time, this government is proposing a one size fits all safety net for Canada that will actually cut our farm safety net funding. Canadian farmers cannot survive continued attacks from their own government as well as foreign governments.

How will the minister of agriculture protect our pulse industry from these new subsidies?

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, I think the hon. member is drawing a conclusion on the U.S. farm bill before it is completed.

However, I have certainly expressed our concerns to my counterpart in the U.S. as has our ambassador in Washington, as I have to the U.S. ambassador here.

We are working with the provinces and with the industry to address all the issues that we need to address in the realities of agriculture today. Included in that is the reorganization of the emphasis within the research department of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to specifically address some of the concerns of the pulse industry.

Gun Registry
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, the taxpayer funded $680 million long gun registry with no tangible benefit is about to be privatized by the Liberal government.

On pain of criminal charges, gun owners must provide the government with sensitive information that could be extremely dangerous in the wrong hands. Many, including the government's own privacy commissioner, have expressed grave concerns about this privatization plan.

Could the Minister of Justice tell Canadians what safeguards will be implemented to ensure the security of this personal information and just how this is going to be a savings for taxpayers?

Gun Registry
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

Liberal

Martin Cauchon Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Basically, Mr. Speaker, what we are talking about here is outsourcing. The aim and goal is to make sure that we will keep offering the Canadian population very good services, and of course privacy concerns will be addressed and taken care of.

Highway Infrastructures
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Finance said that any surplus would be used to pay off the debt. However, if the government wants to fulfill all the promises made by its candidates during the last election campaign, the current amount of $108 million for highways is clearly insufficient.

Does the Deputy Prime Minister intend to fulfill the promises and commitments made by his colleagues and, consequently, will he allocate any surpluses to highways?