House of Commons Hansard #150 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was china.

Topics

Softwood Lumber
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Bill Casey Cumberland—Colchester, NS

Mr. Speaker, today British Columbia's forestry minister joined the chorus of softwood stakeholders calling for a united Canadian stand against the American attack on our softwood lumber industry. For months politicians, foresters and manufacturers have called for the Minister for International Trade to bring all of the stakeholders together to establish a single united position.

Although the U.S. is well organized and well prepared, we have never established our own Canadian bargaining stance. Instead each region has established its own direction. Never did the phrase united we stand, divided we fall apply so aptly. It is hard to imagine how an outcome that will be satisfactory to all regions can be concluded if all the stakeholders have not been brought together by the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.

Even though there are only a few days left, I urge the minister to gather together all stakeholders to develop that one specific Canadian position for our bargaining stance.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:15 p.m.

West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast
B.C.

Canadian Alliance

John Reynolds Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, in a report titled “Pain Without Gain” Canadian manufacturers and exporters warned today that ratifying Kyoto could lead to the loss of 450,000 jobs. Does the Prime Minister accept these figures and if so, how could he dream of ratifying the Kyoto protocol?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I do not accept those figures.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast
B.C.

Canadian Alliance

John Reynolds Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister does not believe the former cabinet minister he himself appointed as head of the CBC. Perhaps he will believe the government of the province most affected by Kyoto.

Alberta estimates that Kyoto could cost Canada 2% to 3% of GDP. That is $25 billion to $40 billion by the year 2010.

Does the Prime Minister believe Alberta's numbers and if so, how can the Prime Minister support the Kyoto protocol?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the government wants to implement the Kyoto protocol and we have negotiated to improve it. We are still asking to have clean energy exports of Canada recognized. We are talking with the provincial governments at this time to reach an agreement between all the partners. We have to make sure that we make a contribution to ensure that the climate of the world improves in the years to come.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast
B.C.

Canadian Alliance

John Reynolds Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, if the Prime Minister does not believe Perrin Beatty and Ralph Klein, then perhaps he will believe Industry Canada.

Somebody said they are Tories. That may be true, but let me talk about Industry Canada and what it has to say. Industry Canada's studies show that Kyoto could cost Canada up to $75 billion per year and lead to the loss of 4% of oil, agriculture and chemical jobs, 9% of natural gas jobs and 11% of electrical jobs.

Is shutting down the economy of Canada the Prime Minister's legacy for Canada?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, there is at this moment some discussion among the provincial governments and the federal government to look at all the facts.

There is the reality too that climate change is causing a lot of problems, for example to the climate in western Canada. Farmers there might pay a price in the future if we do not do anything about it.

We have to look at both sides of the problem. As usual, we will look at all the facts and make a decision in the best interests of all Canadians.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Rahim Jaffer Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, the only global warming is in the Liberal caucus these days.

Manufacturers and exporters have sounded the alarm. According to them, Kyoto could cost us 450,000 jobs. Even the slowest Liberal, such as the Minister of National Defence—if it were explained to him several times—should be able to realize the catastrophic effect this could have on our economy.

Why is this government so determined to ratify this dangerous protocol, without even getting the provinces' consent?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Saint-Maurice
Québec

Liberal

Jean Chrétien Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, regarding the comments from the opposition on party unity, we know that this party will soon have its fourth or fifth leader in eight years, so we have nothing to learn from them. There is also another party that has ended up back there in the corner.

I would like to say that we are giving this problem serious thought. This is a very serious problem that concerns all Canadians. We have nothing to gain by trying to frighten people when we do not have all of the facts. When we do have all of the facts, we will make the right—

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Edmonton—Strathcona.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Rahim Jaffer Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, this caucus stopped fighting a long time ago. That is another thing the government stole from us.

It is not just Canadian businesses and provinces that are worried about Kyoto. It is the government's own figures. Industry Canada's 2001 report shows that to comply with Kyoto could cost up to $75 billion and lead to massive layoffs in the oil, gas, agriculture, electricity and chemical sectors.

Does the Minister of Industry stand by his own department's figures?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as the Prime Minister has made clear, we are looking at all the perspectives in this issue and we will find the answer that is best for Canada.

The narrow view of the opposition looking only at one part of the problem just will not do. We are talking about the future of the planet, what is good for farmers and what is good for all Canadians. We will uncover the true facts and we will make the right decision.

Guaranteed Income Supplement
Oral Question Period

February 27th, 2002 / 2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, in the past, the Prime Minister tried to portray himself as the little guy from Shawinigan. He proudly told us how he defended justice and was close to the people. Today—

Guaranteed Income Supplement
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Guaranteed Income Supplement
Oral Question Period

2:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.